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By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 3, 2010
The Woodlawn-based federal agency that administers the Medicare and Medicaid programs expects to add 200 jobs this year to handle additional responsibilities created by the national health-care reform. The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services offered more details after The Baltimore Sun reported last week that the agency was looking for a swath of new office space in Woodlawn. Half the 130,000 square feet is meant for the health-reform jobs. The agency could not offer details about the planned use of the rest of the space, which was requested for next year.
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NEWS
By Charles Cadwell and Mark Goldberg | October 6, 2014
Climate change has been in the news a lot lately. The United Nations held a Climate Change Summit, which was attended by more than 100 heads of state. Hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets of New York for a "People's Climate March," the biggest such event ever. But there was a third very important climate-related development that received much less attention than it warranted: President Barack Obama issued a new executive order that may prove to be a turning point for efforts to advance climate preparedness around the world and for U.S. foreign aid planning.
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho, The Baltimore Sun | September 16, 2010
The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission is suing Elkton, accusing the Cecil County town of firing an assistant town administrator because of his age. The age discrimination lawsuit, filed Tuesday in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, claims Elkton laid off Andrew P. Johnson because he was 70, even though he had received strong performance evaluations, the EEOC said Thursday. The EEOC contends that Johnson was replaced by two younger employees, one in her 20s and another in his 40s. Johnson was hired as the assistant town administrator and finance director in 1999 and fired in November 2007.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 14, 2014
The officials who are responsible for safeguarding the nation's intelligence secrets are trying to figure out how to better vet millions of employees and contractors with security clearances, after auditors found that some of those workers owed more than three-quarters of a billion dollars in unpaid taxes. About 83,000 employees and contractors at the Department of Defense owed more than $730 million in unpaid taxes, the Government Accountability Office reported last month. Last year, the agency reported that 8,400 executive-branch civilian employees and contractors owed $85 million.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins | jamie.smith.hopkins@baltsun.com | March 11, 2010
Ideal Federal Savings Bank has until March 31 to find a buyer, a deadline set by the Office of Thrift Supervision after the federal agency determined the small Baltimore institution was undercapitalized. The bank — which opened in 1920 to combat rampant discrimination in lending — is one of the oldest continuously operated black-owned businesses in the country, according to Creative Investment Research, an analyst of minority and women-owned banks. But Ideal had just $6.3 million in assets at the end of last year, and borrowers were behind by 90 days or more on about 11 percent of its loans.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Maryland's economy didn't grow last year, according to gross domestic product estimates released Wednesday. The state's GDP remained unchanged, ranking it near the bottom of the country, the U.S. Department of Commerce said. GDP growth was worse only in Washington, D.C., where it fell by half a percent, and in Alaska, down 2.5 percent. Government was the sector that took the largest bite out of Maryland's economy last year. Federal budget cuts rippled through the region, creating drag on neighboring states as well.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | June 26, 1992
The U.S. Office of Personnel Management has become the latest federal agency to capitalize on the depressed commercial real estate market, signing a 10-year lease for 14,542 square feet of office space at the Marsh & McLennan building at 300 W. Pratt St.The agency's local office will be moving out of the Garmatz Federal Courthouse, along with other agencies, to make room for an expansion of the space devoted to courts.John Thompson, a spokesman in Philadelphia for the General Services Administration, which handles real estate leasing for other federal agencies, said the personnel agency will move to its new quarters in July.
NEWS
By Donna E. Boller and Donna E. Boller,Staff Writer | November 17, 1993
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, dissatisfied with private operators' plans to clean up Keystone Landfill -- a Superfund toxic waste site -- will take over the job.Hydro-geologist Christopher J. Corbett told citizens groups last night that the EPA issued a stop-work order to 11 polluters that had been under agency orders to clean up contamination from the now-closed private landfill.The landfill is just north of Silver Run in Adams County, Pa., and Maryland residents have blamed seepage from the landfill for contamination of their wells.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | July 3, 2013
Baltimore's housing agency must pay a public housing resident $150,000 because the city failed to accommodate the woman's request to be moved, the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development announced Wednesday. It also must pay the resident's attorneys $10,000, increase exposure of its reasonable accommodation policies and procedures, train staff about those policies and "submit regular reports to HUD on its efforts to promptly respond to reasonable accommodation requests," HUD said in a statement.
NEWS
By Tom Pelton and Jonathan Bor and Tom Pelton and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2001
Johns Hopkins officials scrambled yesterday to improve safety practices in medical experiments in hopes of persuading a federal agency to lift a suspension of government-funded studies. Hopkins will order additional training for officials who review experiments and will re-evaluate studies to make sure they are safe, according to a letter sent yesterday to the federal Office for Human Research Protections. Top administrators said they would work over the weekend to complete an action plan to satisfy the agency's concerns by next week.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | August 17, 2014
Paul Mincarelli has been trying for three years to get into international work for the federal government. He says he knows the odds are stacked against him. Now the competition is likely to get more intense. Some agencies have begun to limit the number of applications they accept per vacancy. Instead of setting a deadline for applications, some job announcements stay open only until the limit - in some cases as few as 25 resumes - is reached. Mincarelli, 26, has a master's degree in international affairs.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 10, 2014
State and federal officials announced Thursday a $2.2 million research effort aimed at preventing harm to whales and other marine mammals from building massive industrial wind turbines off Ocean City . The two-year study, to be led by the University of Maryland Center for Environmental Science, will include using underwater microphones to record sounds of whales and other marine mammals in the ocean where the federal government is soliciting bids...
NEWS
June 26, 2014
Take a minute and Google the term "Internal Revenue Service" or "IRS," and you will find no shortage of famous quotes from people who are fearful of it. The federal agency has been compared to the Gestapo, the Mafia and the Lord Almighty. Such is the power of the tax collector to strike terror into the hearts of the audited. But recent testimony before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee has conjured a new image for the IRS - clueless, bureaucratic, disorganized and technologically incompetent.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | June 11, 2014
Maryland's economy didn't grow last year, according to gross domestic product estimates released Wednesday. The state's GDP remained unchanged, ranking it near the bottom of the country, the U.S. Department of Commerce said. GDP growth was worse only in Washington, D.C., where it fell by half a percent, and in Alaska, down 2.5 percent. Government was the sector that took the largest bite out of Maryland's economy last year. Federal budget cuts rippled through the region, creating drag on neighboring states as well.
NEWS
By Caroline Little | May 21, 2014
Every day, city hall reporters at local newspapers distill hours of city council meetings into cogent stories that inform readers about how their elected officials are spending their tax dollars. Sports reporters document the successes of the high school team. Investigative reporters dig through thousands of pages of documents to expose government corruption, waste or ineffectiveness. This journalism plays a vital role in local communities and in our nation's democracy. But it also costs money: Newspapers continue to invest more than $5 billion a year in journalism - far more than any other medium in the United States.
NEWS
May 20, 2014
I have been in the horse racing industry for 25 years and totally agree with Keith Dane's thoughts that a federal agency needs to take over control of the sport ( "Stop doping horses," May 15). The states are totally lacking in any control. Jay Stone - To respond to this letter, send an email to talkback@baltimoresun.com . Please include your name and contact information.
NEWS
March 24, 1991
Pasadena resident John Leopold has been appointed by President Bush to be a member of the National Council on Disability.The NationalCouncil on Disability is an independent federal agency composed of 15 members who are appointed by the president and confirmed by the U.S. Senate. It is the only federal agency charged with addressing, analyzing and making recommendations on issues of public policy that affect people with disabilities.
EXPLORE
May 8, 2013
As reported by Rusty Weiss on January 10, 2013, "…. a federal judge struck down the attempt to regulate stormwater runoff as a breach of authority. The judge, U.S. District Judge Liam O'Grady, ruled that the EPA had exceeded their authority in trying to regulate stormwater runoff into a Fairfax County creek because it was a pollutant. " By not appealing its own EPA demand, Maryland's Tax and Spend government has not acted in the interests of taxpaying citizens. Instead, our elected officials add this new "rain tax" to: recent "sin" tax increases, recent sales tax increases, recent road and bridge toll increases, recent increases in licensing and other fees, recent state income tax increases - the list goes on. Furthermore, the "rain tax" is the result of demands made by a Federal Agency, which is responding to a President's executive order (May 2009)
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | May 9, 2014
— The federal agency best known for paying retirement benefits is shutting down a curious side business it began nearly 70 years ago: helping people connect with long-lost relatives. Since the end of World War II, the Social Security Administration has offered a letter-forwarding service to genealogists, investigators and people who lost track of family members as addresses and phone numbers changed or were forgotten. Sometimes the missing are owed money from retirement plans and wills.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 25, 2014
State and federal officials announced Friday they were providing $8 million to pipe clean public water to 270 homes near Salisbury where a toxic solvent has contaminated the ground water supplying residential wells there. Authorities installed water filtration systems in 2012 on 40 homes in the Morris Mill area that were discovered to have high levels of trichloroethylene. Another 18 homes with lower but still elevated levels have been supplied bottled water. Officials say they don't know who dumped the solvent there, but believe it is not continuing.
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