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By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | June 10, 2003
After a 44-year run, rich with production work on films including Hairspray, Avalon, Die Hard: With a Vengeance, My Best Friend's Wedding and Runaway Bride, Baltimore's Flite 3 Studios is shutting its doors - victim of increased competition and declining profit. "This is going to be a huge loss to our industry here," said Mary Holland, a producer who has done commercials at Flite 3 for such clients as Olympus cameras, PING golf clubs and the Maryland Lottery through her company, Holland & Associates.
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NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
One of Center Stage Artistic Director Kwame Kwei-Armah's bright ideas has evolved into a feature film that will be unveiled worldwide next week. The project began in 2012 when Kwei-Armah was looking for a way to celebrate his theater's 50 t h anniversary. He asked such nationally known playwrights as Christopher Durang, Neil LaBute and the Baltimore-born Anna Deavere Smith to answer the question, "What is my America?" and then turned their responses into three-minute films.
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FEATURES
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1997
Behind some of cinema's most vivid and heroic women characters in recent years is a British director with a gray bristle of beard on his chin and a Cuban cigar in his mouth.He launched Sigourney Weaver's Ripley on the first of her battles against rapacious aliens and later set Thelma and Louise loose on their journey of female rebellion. In "G.I. Jane," which opens Friday, he's poised to unleash a heavily muscled, shaven-headed, gutter-talking Demi Moore on the most male of preserves, the SEALS, the Navy's special-forces unit.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 25, 2014
One of the cool ventures that Kwame Kwei-Armah initiated as artistic director of Center Stage was a project in 2012 to mark the theater's 50th anniversary: "My America," a digital collection of monologues by a cross section of playwrights and actors. More than 20 of those monologues about the American experience have been incorporated into a 78-minute film directed by Hal Hartley that will premiere, appropriately, on the Fourth of July, streamed worldwide on Fandor . It will also be screened July 9 at the IFC Center in New York.    Among the works included in the film: "Space Mountain" by Dan Dietz; "Miss America" by Alena Smith (performed by Christy McIntosh)
NEWS
June 24, 1991
Is Baltimore's recent surge as a haven for feature filmmakers ending? Have the area's film unions priced Baltimore out of the cinematic market? Will Pittsburgh, with its non-union film crews, now replace Baltimore as one of Hollywood's favorite locales for shooting realistic urban sequences?That is a sad but increasingly likely scenario. How else do you explain the relocation of one TV movie, "Cobb's Law" from Charm City to Steel City? The shift saved 10 percent of the production cost -- even though the film was scripted to take place in Baltimore.
NEWS
December 25, 1994
Safe communities, good schools and jobs, jobs, jobs. That's Gov-elect Parris Glendening's agenda for the coming four years. So his presence earlier this month at a luncheon honoring James G. Robinson, chairman and CEO of Morgan Creek Productions, was hardly a surprise.Mr. Robinson's story is a classic tale of entrepreneurial achievement, parlaying success in earlier business ventures into one of Hollywood's most powerful independent film studios. Maryland has shared in his rise. Two of his recent features -- "Silent Fall" and "Major League II" -- were filmed in Maryland, enriching the Maryland economy by $30 million.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | October 10, 1991
If Maryland were to become a "serious post-production site" for film and sound-editing, it would increase the state's attractiveness to filmmakers, says actor and producer Mike Farrell.Combine that with investors willing to finance film projects and the state could be the site of "God knows how many films," he added.Mr. Farrell -- who played Capt. B. J. Hunnicutt in television's "M*A*S*H" and has produced a number of feature films since the long-running series ended eight years ago -- met yesterday with state officials and private attorneys and investors to explore ways to reinvigorate filmmaking in Maryland.
FEATURES
By Steven Rea and Steven Rea,Knight-Ridder | November 8, 1991
Bruce Willis, who not long ago said he was going to take a year off from the film business, has changed his mind. With a string of super-expensive disasters behind him ("Hudson Hawk," "The Bonfire of the Vanities"), his new film ("Billy Bathgate," in which he plays Bo Weinberg) plagued with problems from the start, and his Dec. 13 release ("The Last Boy Scout") getting not-so-great word-of-mouth, Willis will try to redeem himself and his box-office clout with a black comedy from director Robert Zemeckis ("Who Framed Roger Rabbit")
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | November 6, 1991
Fred MacMurray, who played the All-American TV dad for 12 years on "My Three Sons, died yesterday of pneumonia at 83.MacMurray, who was born in Kankakee, Ill., died in a Santa Monica, Calif. hospital, after a Hollywood career that spanned seven decades in film and TV. While MacMurray was most widely known during the last 21 years for his amiable suburban-TV-dad persona of "My Three Sons," he also was recognized for distinguished work in feature films playing a greatly different sort of person.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tom LoBianco | March 16, 2000
The splendor of Rome The vitality and diversity of the art of 18th-century Rome will be showcased today through May 28 at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Among the 380 examples of art in "The Splendor of 18th-Century Rome" touring exhibit are paintings, sculpture, works on paper, decorative arts, architectural renderings and models. The more than 160 artists featured include Batoni, Panini, Legros, Rusconi and Bracci. An entire section of the show is devoted to prints, drawings, buildings and books by Giovanni Battista Piranesi.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Sarah-Violet Bliss acknowledges some frustration with fielding questions, yet again, about being a female filmmaker, about how the vast majority of movies seem to be directed by men, and about whether that will stop being the case any time soon. "I didn't realize it was going to be something I had to talk about," says Bliss, whose "Fort Tilden" is one of at least 15 women-directed features being screened at this week's 16th Maryland Film Festival. "I just thought I would talk about the movie.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
  I kept thinking as I was screening the new FX series, "Fargo," that it wasn't all that impressive. And then, I looked up and realized I had been watching for three hours straight. I guess it depends on how you define impressive. At best, it's one of the finest new series of the TV year. At worst, it's definitely worth an hour of your time to check out tonight at 10 on FX. But be careful, it's easy to lose yourself as I did in this world of endless snow, hopelessly flat lands, coffee shops, down jackets, small town facades, brutality, blood, drugs and slaughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2014
Adam Rodgers and his grandfather thought they were taking the train to Philadelphia to check out colleges. But the cinema gods had other things in mind. "We're coming up the escalator," the Baltimore-born director recalled, "and I see this dolly track, I see this big Panavision camera. They were making a movie - Harrison Ford was there. They were making a movie called 'Witness.' I begged my grandfather to let me just stay in Penn Station to watch a little bit. Of course, a little bit became an hour, and an hour became three hours.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2010
Dora the Explorer, an animated, 7-year-old expeditionist whose backpacking adventures have made her a darling among preschool youngsters, is currently starring at Baltimore's National Aquarium. The Nick Jr. children's television network character teams up with cousin Diego in the film "Dora & Diego's 4-D Adventure: Catch that Robot Butterfly!" at the aquarium's 4-D Immersion Theater. The film is scheduled to be shown all month. Daily shows began this week and a Diego costumed character will make a special appearance at the aquarium Saturday and Sunday.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,david.nitkin@baltsun.com | August 25, 2008
DENVER - The lights will dim inside the Pepsi Center tonight, a shock of silver hair will appear on giant monitors, and connections will be made once again between Camelot and the Obama nation. A film tribute to Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, a 46-year-veteran of the Senate diagnosed with a brain tumor this year, will dominate the opening hours of the Democratic National Convention. Watching from a prime seat will be Kathleen Kennedy Townsend, Maryland's former lieutenant governor and Kennedy's niece, one of the state's 99 delegates here.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | October 12, 2007
Nia Malika Dixon is anxious to get this weekend's inaugural Baltimore Women's Film Festival started, and not just because her six-minute short, Temporary Loss of Power, is among the films being shown. "It's a big stepping-stone to my career," says Dixon, a 33-year-old Baltimore native who moved to California in 2005. "I have big plans to produce indie films. The exposure, the networking, that's the most important part of the festival. Being among my peers, other women filmmakers, that's important to me. This forum, with all these different kinds of women, that's awesome."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,Sun Film Critic | March 12, 2000
When Werner Herzog -- born Werner Stipetic on Sept. 5, 1942 -- first walked out of the remote Bavarian village where he was raised, he had never seen an orange. He had never used a telephone, or seen a movie. But just eight years later, at the age of 19, after working the night shift as a welder in a steel factory in order to raise money, he made his first film. Since then, Herzog has made more than 40 feature films and documentaries, the most recent of which documents his extraordinary collaboration with the German actor Klaus Kinski.
FEATURES
By Larry Sutton and Larry Sutton,New York Daily News | August 21, 1995
They're shooting like crazy on New York's subways -- and the Transit Authority couldn't be happier.The nation's film producers have fallen in love with the city's mass transit system, paying almost $1 million annually to feature its trains and stations in their cinematic fantasies. Just check the credits.The IRT's Bowling Green station starred recently in "Batman Forever" and the entire system fills the silver screen this fall in "Money Train," a Columbia Pictures release starring Wesley Snipes and Woody Harrelson as bad transit cops.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun Reporter | August 31, 2007
Seven years into her job putting together film festivals throughout the world, Marisa Cohen noticed that they rarely featured work by women. "There has been a real lack of female filmmakers," says the Baltimore native, who works for the Florida-based HD Fest, organizers of high-definition film festivals in New York, London, Australia and Seoul, South Korea. "Especially in mainstream films, you don't see a lot." Galvanized by the low profile of female filmmakers, she and a friend have organized the inaugural Baltimore Women's Film Festival.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,Sun reporter | February 2, 2007
The endlessly inventive, brilliantly insightful, reliably somber but sometimes (trust me!) surprisingly lighthearted Ingmar Bergman is the subject of a 13-film, 13-week retrospective beginning tomorrow at the Charles Theatre, 1711 N. Charles St. The series kicks off with 1952's Secrets of Women (Kvinnors vantan), the story of four women, all sisters-in-law, telling each other stories of their often-strained marriages. Among the couples are Eva Dahlbeck and Gunnar Bjornstrand, who would go on to star in Bergman's 1955 Smiles of a Summer Night.
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