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NEWS
By Susan Reimer | March 9, 2003
USA Today has just concluded a 10-part series on the 10 hardest things to do in sports, leaving off one of the most difficult: living with my husband, the USA Today sportswriter, while he worked on this project. Men tend to talk about their work more than women do. That may be because women have many jobs, while men just have the one. For weeks, I listened patiently to his recitation of the apples-and-oranges difficulty of comparing sports feats: downhill skiing vs. running a marathon; landing a quad in figure skating vs. returning one of Pete Sampras' serves.
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NEWS
By Jack Israel | March 3, 2014
On Sept. 12, 2001 senior managers and technical experts crammed into the narrow and stuffy conference room of the National Security Agency's Signals Intelligence (SIGINT) director. Each was trying to make sense of what had just happened the previous morning when two jets slammed into the World Trade Center in New York. The obvious questions were: Who had done this? How could we lift the spirits of the demoralized counterterrorism division? And more importantly, how could we find and track the people responsible for this attack?
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BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | October 3, 1999
Based on legacy alone, Paul C. Wolman ought to be practicing law right now.After all, barristers go back two generations in his family. Wolman earned the prerequisite law degree all right, but he made a career of an idea that first struck his fancy as a child.Wolman started throwing parties and magic shows as a youth, and he hasn't stopped -- he's just made the parties more elaborate. His festivities now are attended by thousands and held at posh sites across the country and even internationally.
SPORTS
By Ellen Fishel, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2014
After then-12-year-old Hunter Machin bowled a perfect 300 game earlier this year, he could have left the sport knowing he had accomplished a feat that is difficult even for professional bowlers. But it appears he is not done yet. Now 13, Hunter has bowled an 800 series, something bowling experts consider much more difficult than a 300. The Dundalk resident bowled games of 269, 289 and 278 for a score of 833 on Nov. 9 at Brunswick Perry Hall Lanes. But Hunter wasn't celebrating right away - he was focused on the fact that he narrowly missed another 300 three times in a row. "He was like, 'I can't believe I didn't get my 300 again,'" his mom, Vickie Machin, said.
SPORTS
By John Eisenberg | April 6, 2001
AUGUSTA, Ga. - For the second year in a row, Tiger Woods was relatively far from the leaders after the first round of the Masters yesterday. But no one, least of all Woods himself, believes he will spend the rest of the weekend buried in the pack. In fact, the hottest question at golf's first major championship this year centers on what to do when Woods wins. That is, would we credit him with golf's first modern Grand Slam because he has won four majors in a row dating back to the U.S. Open last summer?
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | March 24, 2001
P. W. Feats Inc., a Baltimore-based event marketing company, has announced an expansion that creates a new destination management division to handle meetings, conferences and related services. The expansion coincides with the 15th anniversary of the local company, which started out of a magic shop in 1985 and has grown to produce more than 150 events a year, with budgets that sometimes top $1 million. "We decided to do it now because the climate was right," said Paul C. Wolman, Feats' president and chief executive.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | April 18, 2003
P.W. Feats Inc., a nearly 18-year-old Baltimore events-marketing firm, will buy two adjacent buildings in Mount Vernon to expand its operation, officials said yesterday. The brownstones, at 3 and 5 E. Read St., will give the firm another 17,000 square feet of space in addition to the 35,000 square feet at its Russell Street location, which it will retain. Renovations are expected to start next month and to be completed in time to move in by late summer. "It's so exciting," said Paul C. Wolman, P.W. Feats founder, chief executive and president.
ENTERTAINMENT
By LORI SEARS | October 27, 2005
The Shangri-La Chinese Acrobats make it look so easy. The feats of daring and balance, the acrobatics and martial arts displays, it all seems effortless. A bit painful perhaps, but effortless. Ooh and aah at the acrobats' performance at the Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts in Annapolis tomorrow. The company, which performs under the direction of the Hai Family, a legendary Chinese acrobatic dynasty, will don colorful costumes and perform seemingly impossible feats, including gravity-defying stunts, amazing examples of strength and more, all with a dose of humor.
NEWS
October 21, 2005
Chinese acrobat show -- Maryland Hall for the Performing Arts will present the Shangri-La Chinese Acrobats at 8 p.m. Oct. 28 at 801 Chase St., Annapolis. This family show features spectacular acrobatic displays, feats of daring and balance, kung fu, brilliant costumes and Chinese comedy in traditions that go back 2,000 years. Tickets are $28 for adults and $18 for children. 410-263-5544.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | January 14, 2010
The San Francisco Giants landed a new left-handed cleanup hitter - and Aubrey Huff made a good-natured reference to the slugger who used to hold the spot. "Listen, if Barry Bonds hit home runs there, I can, right?" Huff joked about the home run king's feats in San Francisco's pitcher-friendly ballpark. The Giants and Huff completed their one-year, $3 million contract Wednesday after the first baseman passed a physical. The sides agreed to terms last weekend. Huff was traded from the Orioles to the Detroit Tigers in August and batted .241 with 15 home runs and 85 RBIs in 150 games between the teams.
NEWS
April 22, 2013
In Baltimore County, like much of Maryland, tax revenues have flat-lined. State aid for such things as road resurfacing is not much better. County workers won't be receiving cost-of-living increases for the fifth year in a row. Yet amid all this austerity, Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz last week proposed a budget that finances new schools and retrofits many others with air conditioning. There are millions of dollars for new school security systems, for a new family resource center on the east side of the county and for new technology for police.
SPORTS
By Chris Trevino, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2012
When a man willingly jumps from 24 miles above the Earth and lives, there is going to be some buzz. On the heels of Austrian Felix Baumgartner's record-setting "supersonic" skydive from the stratosphere last Sunday, the skydiving community in Maryland is thrilled with what the accomplishment could mean for the sport's future. "I think everyone in our sport is enthusiastic about it," said Josh Dolan, the operations manager for the Ocean City Skydiving Center. "Everyone is really excited.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
Only 30 horses have made it to the Belmont Stakes with a chance to win the Triple Crown. Eleven have succeeded. This is whyI'll Have Another's quest to become the 12th at Belmont Park on June 9 will captivate a nation that long ago stopped paying close attention to the way thoroughbred horses run. Every contender vying to become the first Triple Crown winner since Affirmed in 1978 is a Cinderella - a term not commonly used to describe...
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | May 8, 2012
For the second time in 40 years, a member of the "Flying Wallenda" family will wow Inner Harbor crowds Wednesday with nothing between him and the murky harbor waters but a wire cable. Self-proclaimed "King of the High Wire" Nik Wallenda will follow in the footsteps of his great-grandfather, Karl, "The Great Wallenda. " While Karl Wallenda crossed the harbor over 600 feet of wire 60 feet in the air in 1973, Nik Wallenda will ascend a wire stretched 300 feet from the Light Street pavilion to a barge in the harbor, up to a height of about 90 feet.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
The Orioles began their current six-game road trip with many believing it would tell us a lot about what we need to know about the 2012 Birds. Baltimore's early-season success could be discounted by a favorable schedule early on, but road series in New York and Boston would be better indicators of the Orioles' staying power. And then the Orioles took two of three in the Bronx, shutting the Yankees bats down to three combined runs. Now they go to Fenway, where they took three of four in their last trip, a precursor to their final-weekend demolishing of the Red Sox's postseason hopes at Camden Yards.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
Bob Baffert calls his son, Bode, over for the cameras. The boy, a shy 7-year-old, relents as his mother brushes a mess of brown hair from his eyes. Then the boy shows what he's learned from his father, the witty trainer whose hard-driving style has led to three trips to the winner's circle at the Kentucky Derby. "Who are you rooting for?" Bode is asked as he stares at a giant microphone hovering near his head. ("Looks like a rat," Baffert had exclaimed.) "I don't know," Bode says, scratching his head and twisting his face to look confused.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Sun | October 29, 2006
Michael Rosman's show combines slapstick comedy and daring feats. For example, he balances a blender on his head and catapults bananas into it. Also, he juggles flaming torches and a running chainsaw. And sometimes he does it while riding a 9-foot-tall unicycle. The stunts are all part of his Amazing Feats of Comedy act that he started performing more than 15 years ago. After making a name for himself on the variety show circuit, Rosman is ready to tackle a new feat - a two-person show called Rosman and Rose.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | July 7, 1993
Take 10,000 crab cakes, an ersatz Bay Bridge and a dozen waitresses wearing "Hi Hon" T-shirts. What do you get?Major league's All-Star Gala.But that's just a hint of things to come on Monday evening when Baltimore sets out to dazzle baseball's elite. On the eve of the match-up between the American and National Leagues' finest, the boys of baseball -- along with their families, club officials and visiting media -- will see and taste "Maryland in Miniature," all without ever leaving the Maryland Science Center promenade.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2011
Thursday marks the start of Baltimore Beer Week, so we asked our staff what they think about the brew's invention. •••• If the beer is made by Brewer's Art, then somewhere between the airplane and the microchip. If it's one of the diet beers from BMC, then somewhere below the ShamWow.  Luke Broadwater, reporter, The Baltimore Sun •••• It's maybe not quite as essential as fire, but I'll definitely take it over the wheel.  Anne Tallent, editor,  b •••• Somewhere in between soap and the Dyson Ball vacuum.  Wesley Case, reporter,  b •••• Is there really a question about beer being No. 1?
SPORTS
By Edward Lee, The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2011
A week after the bracket for the NCAA tournament was revealed, the first-round outcomes appeared to validate the selection committee's seeding decisions. Seven of the eight seeded teams emerged victorious this past weekend, and Maryland's 13-6 rout of No. 8 seed North Carolina isn't considered an upset in many corners. But four of the favorites found themselves trailing in the first quarter or at halftime. No. 6 Denver fell into a 7-5 hole against Villanova at intermission; Bucknell led No. 7 seed Virginia 4-1 by the end of the first quarter; and Hartford and Hofstra took leads of 3-1 and 2-0 against No. 2 seed Cornell and No. 3 seed Johns Hopkins, respectively.
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