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Fear Of Flying

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NEWS
February 24, 1992
Fifth-grade teacher Barbara Walters may well be the Amelia Earhart of Hagerstown. She instructs an after-school class for girls called "Aviation Invasion," which aims to pique young women's interest in math and science by teaching them about flying. The girls meet one afternoon a week in an old airplane hangar to talk about flying skills and career opportunities. On weekends, Ms. Walters leads them on field trips to local airports where they meet with air traffic controllers and examine vintage aircraft.
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NEWS
By Kathleen Parker | May 6, 2009
IN THE MIAMI AIRPORT -Against the advice of our vice president, I have braved the germ-infested world, forced into transit by prior commitments and surrounded by strangers who may not recently have washed their hands. My own, of course, are scabbed from repeated scrubbing through all four lines of "Happy Birthday to You," which, my epidemiologist-neighbor tells me, is how long you have to keep the soap on your hands to do any good. At this writing, I am sequestered in a small partitioned area of Miami International Airport.
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NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | April 2, 1998
Just as Woody Allen claims to avoid the sun ("I don't tan, I stroke"), I avoid airplanes. People ask, You're afraid of flying? No, I reply. Crashing. The very thought of it gives me a stroke.At least until last week. After a stretch of 11 earthbound years, punctuated by one inexplicable plane ride, preceded by eight years in which gravity prevailed, I went to Baltimore-Washington International Airport on March 26, wrapped one clammy mitt around my wife's cool, protective hand and let her lead me, with whimpers that could barely be heard above the roar of Southwest Airlines engines, to Jacksonville, Fla., where my brother and his family live.
NEWS
By MEREDITH COHN and MEREDITH COHN,SUN REPORTER | July 20, 2007
Congested airways, packed airplanes and an arcane air traffic system have combined with a fierce thunderstorm season to create extreme delays and frustrations for travelers this year. Many passengers have spent extra hours or days in airports and hotels, finding it nearly impossible to rebook after missing a connection, thanks to peak customer demand. With fewer airline agents to help and tighter security, passengers are passing more of that time waiting in lines. Airline delays in June were among the worst in the past dozen years, and government data show that the trend has been building along with the post-Sept.
FEATURES
By Mike Royko and Mike Royko,Tribune Media Services | July 2, 1991
Mike Royko is on vacation. This is one of his favorite columns, which first appeared in the Chicago Tribune in 1984.THE MOMENT I SAW that Newsweek magazine's cover story was about phobias, I thumbed through looking for the part about mine.I skimmed past the part about the agoraphobic (fear of spaces) lady who had come out of her apartment only three times in 61 years. And the gephyrophobic (bridges) man whose wife puts him in the car trunk when they cross a dreaded span. And all the other examples of phobics who fear snakes, shopping malls, strangers, eating in public, dogs, germs, vehicles or darkness.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | May 31, 1995
A look of disbelief spread across the young executive's face. It was a look I've seen many times."You've got to be kidding," he said. And I've heard that many times too.No, it's the truth.He shook his head and said: "I don't believe it." He looked at my wife and she nodded."You don't fly?" he asked. "Really?"That's right."Amazing," he said. "I've never met anyone who doesn't fly."And I've never understood why people always find it amazing. If you think about it, just the opposite ought to be true.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon and By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 17, 1996
My husband ruined our holiday. We were all set to visit my parents with our children. But when we got to the airport he chickened out and refused to get on the plane. We flew without him and I couldn't enjoy the visit.My husband is wonderful except for an irrational fear of flying. He is not afraid of anything else, but the thought of getting on an airplane terrifies him.Is there some prescription medicine that he could take to calm him down enough to travel with the family?This year's headlines about air crashes have made it harder on folks who fear flying.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2001
CHARLOTTE AMALIE, Virgin Islands - The smooth, white sand at the Bolongo Bay Beach Club is almost footprint free these days. Among a row of chaises set out for sunning, just one is occupied - not by a tourist, but by a local woman. The weather is the best in 10 years, but today only one swimmer floats amid the aqua waters. Business is so slow, even the iguanas that beg maraschino cherries are having a tough time. "It's beautiful ... and no one's here," says Richard Doumeng, the resort's general manager.
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | August 4, 1996
Twelve-year-old Michael Duane suddenly is reluctant to fly to California to visit his grandparents. My 10-year-old daughter was unusually jittery before she boarded her flight to Minnesota to camp. "This plane won't crash," Reggie kept repeating.Some kids are frantic when parents leave on business trips for fear they'll never come home. Others are begging to change vacation plans so they don't have to fly. "It's everywhere," said Nancy Schretter, who directs America Online's Family Travel Network.
NEWS
October 26, 2003
The most common phobia in the world is arachnophobia, or a fear of spiders. Second is a fear of people and social situations. Coming in third is a fear of flying. -- Top 10 of Everything 2004 by Russell Ash
NEWS
November 19, 2006
Walter J. "Check" Dorsey Jr., a 33-year employee of the U.S. Postal Service, died of cancer Tuesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 84 and a longtime resident of Lauraville. He was born and raised in West Baltimore. He graduated from Douglass High School in 1939, where he excelled in mathematics, according to his wife of 54 years, the former Geraldine Mann. He took classes at Temple University and what is now Morgan State University, she said. During World War II, he served in the Army as a technician in the 823rd Engineer Aviation Battalion.
NEWS
October 26, 2003
The most common phobia in the world is arachnophobia, or a fear of spiders. Second is a fear of people and social situations. Coming in third is a fear of flying. -- Top 10 of Everything 2004 by Russell Ash
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | September 7, 2002
When the nation's airports shut down after the Sept. 11 attacks, air travelers first wondered when they could fly again. Then, after government-mandated security checks required them to take off shoes, open suitcases and submit to rigorous pat-downs, many wondered if they would fly again. Americans have returned to the skies, but they're not flying as they did before. The tanking economy and intensified security have pushed customers to drive when they can - and brace themselves for airport hassles when they can't.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | November 3, 2001
With many travelers afraid to fly, the battered cruise-ship industry is beginning to send liners to secondary ports such as Baltimore in hopes that vacationers will be willing to drive or take a bus - instead of a plane - to board their vessel. The question for Baltimore and other cities hoping to profit from the trend is whether the business will stay once the memory of Sept. 11 begins to fade from the nation's consciousness. The answer could affect whether state transportation officials decide to invest in a new cruise-ship passenger terminal in the Inner Harbor.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2001
CHARLOTTE AMALIE, Virgin Islands - The smooth, white sand at the Bolongo Bay Beach Club is almost footprint free these days. Among a row of chaises set out for sunning, just one is occupied - not by a tourist, but by a local woman. The weather is the best in 10 years, but today only one swimmer floats amid the aqua waters. Business is so slow, even the iguanas that beg maraschino cherries are having a tough time. "It's beautiful ... and no one's here," says Richard Doumeng, the resort's general manager.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2001
Despite Tuesday's terrorist attacks involving commercial airline flights, the Ravens are not fearful about the most demanding travel schedule in the NFL over the next two months. The Ravens will be boarding planes for six of the next eight weekends, playing games at Cincinnati, Denver, Green Bay, Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Tennessee. That's an arduous round-trip total of 8,882 miles in the air. Amid questions of airport security, the Ravens are planning subtle changes to their itinerary and will continue to travel on commercial charter flights that carry only team personnel.
NEWS
November 19, 2006
Walter J. "Check" Dorsey Jr., a 33-year employee of the U.S. Postal Service, died of cancer Tuesday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 84 and a longtime resident of Lauraville. He was born and raised in West Baltimore. He graduated from Douglass High School in 1939, where he excelled in mathematics, according to his wife of 54 years, the former Geraldine Mann. He took classes at Temple University and what is now Morgan State University, she said. During World War II, he served in the Army as a technician in the 823rd Engineer Aviation Battalion.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | April 2, 1993
I woke up feeling violent, nauseous, quizzical, coquettish . . . it was a day like any other day except worse, much worse.Larry came by the house at 9, tooting the car horn in that annoying BEEP-BEEP-BEEEEP way of his."Ready to do some flying?" he shouted.Actually, I was ready to do some throwing up, but there was no sense telling him that.As I walked out the door, a man on TV was saying: "New Tide with grease releasers!" How ironic that on the last day of my life a detergent commercial would form one of my final mental snapshots.
FEATURES
By Laura Sullivan and Laura Sullivan,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2001
As I dangled upside down in the cockpit of an F/A-18 Hornet, the blood rushing to my head, the view of the Patuxent River arrived in a 700-mph flash. Through the cockpit window, dozens of waterfront houses appeared as flecks of white in the corner of my eye. Struggling to maintain my composure in a seat harness, resisting the urge to grab the control stick, I realized the futility of trying to keep my bearings. Nothing about flying with the Blue Angels was going to match my preconceived notions about airplanes or even gravity.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | October 7, 1999
LET ME admit upfront that I am one of those people who spends every moment on an airline flight convinced the plane is about to drop out of the sky and slam into the ground like a lawn dart.So the story of that 12-year-old boy who sneaked on a flight to St. Louis didn't do much for my nerves.Maybe you heard about this little monster.The short version goes like this: The kid got in trouble at his Fairfax, Va., elementary school and was sent to see the principal.But instead of going to face the heat, he did what any kid would do in that situation: He freaked out and hopped a train to Reagan Airport in Washington.
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