Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFear Of Crime
IN THE NEWS

Fear Of Crime

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
December 10, 1991
Recently, a man driving his car downtown during rush hour with a small boy as passenger suddenly found himself in the middle of a robbery in progress. Another car suddenly emerged from a darkened alley; its driver, momentarily blocked by the man's car, used his vehicle as a battering ram to push the obstacle aside, then swerved out into the traffic, tires screeching, and fishtailed away down Centre Street. An instant later, the man saw a woman run from the alley shouting, "He stole my car!"
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 1, 2011
Regarding your report of the alleged rape of a 13-year-old girl in Baltimore: As a 16-year-old girl myself, I feel the city is not getting much better dealing with crime ("DNA links man to rape of girl, 13, in October," Nov. 29). Day after day, I see headlines about some young girl or boy being kidnapped or raped and it makes me feel that nowhere is safe. The girl that was raped was just coming from a friend's house and going to the store, minding her own business, and then some disgusting man comes and decides to push her into a vacant dwelling and rape her. I just do not understand why men can't leave little kids alone and stop instilling fear and emotional pain on their lives.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Ed Heard and Ivan Penn and Ed Heard and Ivan Penn,Sun Staff Writers | April 9, 1995
Former Howard County police officer turned security consultant Victor Riemer finds a warm reception these days when he knocks on homeowners' doors to pitch burglar alarms. "The fear of crime is hitting them," he says. "More times than not, they're thankful I showed up."Howard police officers say such fear is only natural, but a review of county and state crime statistics dating back to 1975 indicates much of this concern may be unfounded:* While the total number of crimes has increased since 1975, the county's mushrooming population has pushed down the crime rate steadily since 1986.
NEWS
August 4, 2010
I have never commented on any article in your paper before, but this article ("Nothing new about fear-of-crime complaints," Aug. 4) upset me so much that I had to say something. In what way do these stats "counter" city residents' fears about crime? I cannot imagine how hard a policeman's job in Baltimore must be, but the scrutiny that the department receives for the continued state of crime in this city is in no way unfair. I live in Mount Vernon and generally feel very safe in my neighborhood.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | December 18, 1994
SHARON, Pa. -- For James E. Winner Jr., crime -- and the fear it spawns -- most assuredly pays.Over the years, Mr. Winner has sold women's clothing, chemicals and keyboard organs. But it took a steering-wheel lock, designed to prevent car theft, to make his fortune.The lock -- shaped something like a police nightstick and called the Club -- came on the market in 1986. It was distributed by Mr. Winner and a secretary from this fraying steel town north of Pittsburgh.Now, 14 million Clubs and what seems like an equal number of "I'm-not-an-actor-I'm-a-police-officer" ads later, he conducts business from a four-story building with a huge rooftop sign that reads "The Winner."
NEWS
By Peter Hermann | November 3, 1996
GLEN COVE, N.Y. -- As I sit inside a posh Long Island conference center, a world away from my gut-wrenching job as The Sun's crime reporter, I cringe as a panel of academics and police officials tells me that the nation has an irrational fear of crime, and it's my fault.Well, not all my fault. The rest of the media are to blame too, along with the politicians who demagogue the crime issue. You see, according to the panelists, we're all in cahoots, the media and the politicians; we're locked in a conspiracy to scare the public into believing there is anarchy on the streets.
NEWS
September 17, 1993
After a German tourist was murdered in Miami and before a British tourist was murdered near Tallahassee, the Miami Herald editorialized, "Fighting crime against visitors is only a partial answer to the problem . . . . We must also stop the daily savagery against each other." A Herald columnist wrote, "We should be less concerned about how others view us and more concerned about how we view ourselves." Sure, but precisely because the victims were visitors, no recent crime story has so highlighted the direct link between crime and a community's overall well being.
NEWS
September 6, 1994
For parents today, protecting the day-to-day safety of children is understandably of paramount concern. Reported abuses and assaults pierce the airwaves with nerve-wracking frequency. Locale no longer seems to matter since crimes appear increasingly random. It also probably does no good to point out that the fear of crime exceeds one's chances of being victimized.When it comes to children, of course, no one wants to take a chance.That is why it is easy to sympathize with the parents of Waterloo Elementary School, who want the Howard County school system to provide bus transportation for about 70 students who must walk a Columbia pathway to school each day. The parents contend that the pathway is unsafe for young children because of crime in the area.
NEWS
April 13, 1995
The latest crime statistics help to betray the fact that the public's fear of crime in Howard County exceeds the reality. While the total number of crimes committed in Howard has increased, the crime rate has gone down in light of the county's growing population. The result has been that the chance of being a victim of crime in Howard -- particularly violent crime -- is less than almost anywhere else in suburban Maryland.We don't mean to diminish people's fears, however, which are illustrated by the increasing number of residents installing home alarm systems and enrolling in self-defense classes.
NEWS
September 15, 1992
Little Italy residents are considering anti-crime patrols to curb sporadic lawlessness in their tight rowhouse and restaurant neighborhood near Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Convinced that their problems are due to their proximity to a public housing project, some are even talking about erecting a fence to keep "troublemakers" out.Crime and fear of crime are such a defining feature of life in today's urban America that people's concern for personal safety should not be minimized. But neither should it be exploited for fanning hysteria.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | August 3, 2010
The mayor confronted a citizen at a community meeting. "Is there any crime in your neighborhood?" the chief executive asked. "Oh yea, it's terrible," the man replied. Said the mayor: "Well, what specifically? Has anything happened to you or to your wife? A neighbor?" Said the man: "No. But the morning paper is full of it. " The man wasn't identified in the editorial published in The Baltimore Sun that recounted this conversation. The mayor was William Donald Schaefer.
NEWS
June 3, 2009
In a perfect world, people would marshal all the facts, calmly evaluate them under the clear light of reason and then draw conclusions based on their knowledge and experience. Unfortunately, that's not how the real world works. People make decisions based on all kinds of factors - impulses, emotions and desires as much as intellect - and even our perceptions of "the facts" often as not are colored by the feelings we bring to them. As the eminent behavioral economist Dan Ariely wryly observed, we are predictably irrational creatures.
NEWS
By PETER HERMANN and PETER HERMANN,peter.hermann@baltsun.com | September 7, 2008
The new signs are up in Federal Hill Park, flanking entrances to the historic lookout once favored by generals and their armies and more recently by boyfriends and girlfriends who come for the views of the glimmering harbor and the bright lights of the city skyline. "Park closed 11 p.m. until dawn," the signs say in large, hard-to-miss red letters. "Trespassing is strictly prohibited." Most city parks close at dusk. This one in Federal Hill has always closed later, though the signs listed conflicting times and police never consistently enforced the curfew.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,Sun reporter | July 15, 2007
Baltimoreans overwhelmingly believe that crime is the most important challenge facing the city and that crime is damaging the city's economy, according to a new poll conducted for The Sun. The poll by the independent firm OpinionWorks of Annapolis suggests that fear of crime has pervaded the entire city. More than one in four residents say they've considered moving out because of crime, and almost half say crime has prompted them to change something in their daily lives. "We do not go out after sunset because of all the shootings in our area," said Gary G. Steffe, a 60-year-old Brooklyn resident.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2002
The weekend killing of a homeless man in an affluent neighborhood in downtown Annapolis has renewed fears of crime in a city still shaken from a killing in the historic district three weeks ago. The victims and the means of death were different, but both crimes occurred on quiet, dead-end streets in wealthy areas where violent crime mostly is relegated to television. For residents of Murray Hill - a downtown neighborhood with wide yards and large homes - that sense of security was shattered Saturday when a Stewart Avenue resident picking up his newspaper around 7:30 a.m. discovered a badly beaten man lying semiconscious near his yard.
NEWS
By Amanda J. Crawford and Amanda J. Crawford,SUN STAFF | October 8, 2002
The weekend killing of a homeless man in an affluent neighborhood in downtown Annapolis has renewed fears of crime in a city still shaken from a killing in the historic district three weeks ago. The victims and the means of death were different, but both crimes occurred on quiet, dead-end streets in wealthy areas where violent crime mostly is relegated to television. For residents of Murray Hill - a downtown neighborhood with wide yards and large homes - that sense of security was shattered Saturday when a Stewart Avenue resident picking up his newspaper about 7:30 a.m. discovered a badly beaten man lying semiconscious near his yard.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Tia Matthews and Peter Hermann and Tia Matthews,Sun Staff Writers | March 24, 1995
Michele Flanagan's parents didn't want her to visit Baltimore."They said it wasn't a good place," said Ms. Flanagan, 19, who attends a small college in Connecticut and was visiting Harborplace yesterday. "They perceived it to be like New York."Perceptions like this are under attack by the city's business and tourism bureaus, who are out to prove that visiting downtown Baltimore is not synonymous with being mugged."Fear of crime is a national phenomenon," said Laurie Schwartz, president of the Downtown Partnership, a private organization that promotes businesses.
NEWS
By Heather Tepe and Heather Tepe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 27, 2001
HARPER'S CHOICE residents had a lot to celebrate Saturday, when the village's Community Action Center marked its one-year anniversary with entertainment, food and a community resource fair. Designated a HotSpot a year ago, many residents in Harper's Choice credit the Community Action Center, in the village center, with a reduction in crime and a revitalized sense of community throughout the village. The Harper's Choice Community Partnership, comprised of business and community leaders working to improve life in the village, lobbied to have the village designated a HotSpot.
NEWS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | January 30, 2001
In 1969, when Severn in western Anne Arundel County was mostly farmland surrounded by groves of sweet gum trees, neighbors heard murmuring about a townhouse complex coming to the area. Those who remember hearing about Pioneer City then say developers billed it as a quiet, affordable community to house Fort Meade personnel and Washington commuters. Gladys Twardowski wasn't thrilled about it, but she said neither she nor her neighbors voiced organized objections. After all, the area had changed little since the post-World War II years, when her mother-in-law, Alice Twardowski, bought 14 acres of farmland there as a respite for her children from inner-city Baltimore.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.