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NEWS
January 16, 2014
I heartily agree with Eileen Pollock when she says that she can't overstate how pleasant Baltimoreans are ("Baltimore is no New York," Jan.14). I moved to Baltimore from out of state seven years ago and have been struck by the friendliness and helpfulness of everyone. Ms. Pollock then proceeds to make some generalizations about daily life in Baltimore, unsupported by evidence, and seems to contradict her initial description of the city as a relaxed, friendly place. She says Baltimore is totally car dependent while New York is easy to navigate on public transportation.
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NEWS
January 16, 2014
I heartily agree with Eileen Pollock when she says that she can't overstate how pleasant Baltimoreans are ("Baltimore is no New York," Jan.14). I moved to Baltimore from out of state seven years ago and have been struck by the friendliness and helpfulness of everyone. Ms. Pollock then proceeds to make some generalizations about daily life in Baltimore, unsupported by evidence, and seems to contradict her initial description of the city as a relaxed, friendly place. She says Baltimore is totally car dependent while New York is easy to navigate on public transportation.
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NEWS
October 25, 2012
The last debate ("Candidates trade foreign policy jabs," Oct. 23) demonstrated that Mitt Romney's approach is back to how George W. Bush lead this country - with fear of "imminent threat. " President Bush and Karl Rove lied to this country by using the tactic of "fear" to warrant a war. And now Mr. Romney is using this same fear factor to say that we need to spend more on the military and get ready for war. President Barack Obama, on the other hand, is using economic sanctions to prevent the need for another war. As for Mr. Romney's description of an "apology tour," I truly admire President Obama's ability to stay calm and level headed when in comes to foreign diplomacy.
NEWS
October 25, 2012
The last debate ("Candidates trade foreign policy jabs," Oct. 23) demonstrated that Mitt Romney's approach is back to how George W. Bush lead this country - with fear of "imminent threat. " President Bush and Karl Rove lied to this country by using the tactic of "fear" to warrant a war. And now Mr. Romney is using this same fear factor to say that we need to spend more on the military and get ready for war. President Barack Obama, on the other hand, is using economic sanctions to prevent the need for another war. As for Mr. Romney's description of an "apology tour," I truly admire President Obama's ability to stay calm and level headed when in comes to foreign diplomacy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | October 25, 2011
Julie McKinney almost didn't talk to us for this story. Not because she was worried about what she'd reveal or that she was nervous to see herself in print. But because of what she might see: a picture of a snake. McKinney is scared of snakes - has been since she was was a little girl. If she did see even an image of a snake on our pages, she'd likely throw down this edition. And we, of course, don't want that to happen. “I can't look at pictures. I can't look at the TV when they're on it,” said McKinney, a 24-year-old Federal Hill resident.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | April 30, 2007
ATLANTA -- So what sort of presidential campaign do you run if you're too liberal for conservatives, you're too Republican for Democrats, and you drag along a personal life too messy for moderates? Rudolph W. Giuliani has just answered that question: He'll be counting on the fear factor. Mr. Giuliani has become the first Republican presidential candidate to enthusiastically embrace the Karl Rove strategy of scaring voters into becoming supporters. Campaigning in New Hampshire last week, Mr. Giuliani declared that if a Democrat were to be elected president in 2008, he (or she)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 20, 2001
LOS ANGELES - Scott Sassa and Jeff Zucker, the NBC programmers responsible for plunging the network neck-deep into the slime of reality programming with shows like Fear Factor that feature contestants being bitten by rats and angry dogs, want you to know they are proud of such programming. "We are proud of putting shows on that capture peoples' imagination in terms of winning a game show or what they would do in terms of facing their fears. We're really proud that these are compelling shows and people are responding to them," Sassa, the president of NBC West Coast, said yesterday during a press conference that found him and Zucker under constant fire for their commitment to reality fare.
FEATURES
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2003
In the 15 months Fear Factor has been on NBC, it's shown repeatedly why it's the very definition of "Must-See TV." After all, what other series has shown seemingly normal people climbing into a pit filled with boa constrictors, letting 50 tarantulas run freely on their heads or scarfing down anything from buffalo testicles to maggot-infested cheese? For three seasons, Fear Factor contestants have tackled all sorts of creepy-crawlies to compete for a $50,000 prize. This afternoon, the show's producers are rolling into Gold's Gym in Falls Church, Va., in search of more willing subjects.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | August 30, 2004
The new fall television season starts tonight -- sort of. With NBC attempting to use the momentum of the Olympics to launch its fall lineup, while arch-rival Fox tries to counter, new series will begin premiering tonight in the earliest start of the fall season ever. But not all networks will be equally involved just yet, as a TV tradition that's been in place for more than four decades begins to lose its hold on the rhythms of prime-time programming. "Whether or not you consider this the most nontraditional fall season ever depends on what network you're talking about," Preston Beckman, senior vice president for strategic programming at Fox, said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
By George F. Will | June 22, 2001
WASHINGTON -- Fred Allen, a mordantly sophisticated radio performer, died (mercifully, if not causally) just as television was permeating America, in 1956. He warned us: "Imitation is the sincerest form of television." So there will be imitations of "Fear Factor." That NBC program, in its first episode last week, attracted nearly 12 million voyeurs to watch simpletons confront their fears, for a fee. In that episode, confronters were covered by a swarm of biting rats. This week the program featured a willingness to eat worms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel, b | October 25, 2011
Julie McKinney almost didn't talk to us for this story. Not because she was worried about what she'd reveal or that she was nervous to see herself in print. But because of what she might see: a picture of a snake. McKinney is scared of snakes - has been since she was was a little girl. If she did see even an image of a snake on our pages, she'd likely throw down this edition. And we, of course, don't want that to happen. “I can't look at pictures. I can't look at the TV when they're on it,” said McKinney, a 24-year-old Federal Hill resident.
BUSINESS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,Special to The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2008
Marc Hayes has been in the mortgage business for 19 years, but these days he often feels more like a therapist. With all the uncertainty in the economy, buyers are looking for reassurance about their home purchases, Hayes says. "There's a lot more hand-holding - a lot more coaxing," he says. As another disappointing real estate year nears an end, experts have various theories about what is shaping the mindset of sellers and what is holding back buyers, whether it's gloomy economic news or urban legends about the million-dollar estate to be had for $250,000.
NEWS
By McClatchy-Tribune | June 26, 2008
WASHINGTON - Echoing comments by Democratic presidential candidate Barack Obama, Kansas Gov. Kathleen Sebelius predicted that Republicans would undertake "a major effort to try and frighten people about him" because of his race. "That has been the Republican playbook for the last eight years," said Sebelius, an Obama ally. "'He's not qualified; he's somebody who should scare you. He's too liberal.'" Sebelius, often mentioned as a possible running mate for Obama, said those were all "code words" to try to make voters "uncomfortable."
SPORTS
By BILL ORDINE | February 12, 2008
The gruesome injury suffered over the weekend by Florida Panthers forward Richard Zednik, whose carotid artery was severed by a teammate's skate in a freak accident during a game in Buffalo, was one more in a long list of reminders of the peril to which athletes are exposed. Zednik's life was saved by surgery at Buffalo General Hospital. In the fall, at another Buffalo hospital, Bills tight end Kevin Everett was the beneficiary of surgery that not only saved his life but also was part of several remarkable medical treatments that helped him recover from a paralyzing injury he suffered while making a tackle against the Denver Broncos on a kickoff.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | October 14, 2007
BOSTON-- --Like bottles of champagne and big shiny trophies, emotions, too, have assigned positions in the playoffs. To the victors goes elation. And to the opposing clubhouse go tears. Before we even reach that point, though, there are tiny emotional markers that guide us along the path. We've seen Field of Dreams, so we've long ago given up on that silly notion that there's no crying in baseball. But there's still one basic emotional tenet that was true a century ago and will remain true a century from now: There's no room for fear.
NEWS
By CYNTHIA TUCKER | April 30, 2007
ATLANTA -- So what sort of presidential campaign do you run if you're too liberal for conservatives, you're too Republican for Democrats, and you drag along a personal life too messy for moderates? Rudolph W. Giuliani has just answered that question: He'll be counting on the fear factor. Mr. Giuliani has become the first Republican presidential candidate to enthusiastically embrace the Karl Rove strategy of scaring voters into becoming supporters. Campaigning in New Hampshire last week, Mr. Giuliani declared that if a Democrat were to be elected president in 2008, he (or she)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,Sun Staff | March 9, 2003
FALLS CHURCH, VA. -- Midway through a casting call this week, Fear Factor producers had made barely a dent in the line of hundreds that clogged the parking lot -- but Mikey Glazer already knew the afternoon was going to be a success. Glazer, casting producer for the NBC reality show, had personally auditioned about 50 people in two hours, and one thing stuck out. "I didn't get any headshots today," said a smiling Glazer, whose show features contestants performing gruesome tasks like eating sheeps' eyeballs to win $50,000.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | January 29, 2002
BOSTON - At some point before the commercial break, while the flames were leaping and the heart monitor was beeping, I pondered the life of John McEnroe. I thought back to that wonderful moment at Wimbledon when the bad boy of tennis had just blown a point or two. Mr. McEnroe turned and screamed at the audience: "I'm so disgusting, you shouldn't watch. Everybody leave!" How true! How prescient! Two decades later, he's hosting the brand new high-anxiety, primetime stress-test game known as - ominous tones, please - The Chair.
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