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HEALTH
Andrea K. Walker | March 1, 2012
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved a new vaccine to prevent the seasonal flu. FluMist Quadrivalent is the first vaccine to contain four strains of the influenza virus - two influenza A strains and two B strains. It is manufactured by Gaithersburg-based MedImmune LLC. The new vaccine containst weakened forms of the virus strains and is administered by a spray into the nose.  Prior to approval of the new drug, other vaccines contained three strains of flu - two A and one B. The addition of a B strain increases the likelihood of protection, the FDA said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
There's nothing different about your Berger cookie. It's just the nutritional label that's changed. A sharp-eyed shopper wrote in to tell us that he had tried the Berger cookie that has 0 grams of trans fat, and that it tasted just as good as the 1-gram fudge-topped classic that's been produced and enjoyed in Baltimore for generations. We went out and bought a pack of trans-fat-free Berger and we also couldn't see or taste anything different about the new Berger cookie.  That's because there is no difference.
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FEATURES
By Kim Fernandez,
For The Baltimore Sun
| October 23, 2013
The federal Food and Drug Administration today released an update on its investigation into jerky pet treats: As of Sept. 24, the agency says, more than 3,600 pets have become ill and 580 have died after eating the snacks. In a fact sheet, the FDA says the treats in question are sold as jerky tenders or strips, and list chicken, duck, sweet potato, dried fruit, and combinations of those foods in their ingredient lists. Extensive testing has been conducted to find the source of the illnesses and deaths, but to date, no definitive cause has been identified.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
Lying awake at night staring at the ceiling is never fun. But we all experience this insomnia at some points in our lives. When sleeplessness becomes chronic, it can cause other health and lifestyle problems. Dr. Audrey Liu, a sleep specialist at Mercy Medical Center, talks about how to treat insomnia. What are the different symptoms of insomnia? Nighttime symptoms of insomnia include difficulty falling asleep, recurrent awakenings throughout the night and early awakenings.
BUSINESS
January 14, 2010
A Jessup seafood processor that had been ordered by the Food and Drug Administration to stop operations because it wasn't complying with federal safety laws will resume normal business Thursday with a new food handling plan. The agency said Congressional Seafood Co. Inc. did not document that fish were refrigerated at correct temperatures, failed to keep fish species separate to avoid cross-contamination and did not keep sanitation records. The company delivers seafood in Virginia, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Washington.
NEWS
January 8, 2014
Del. Dan Morhaim's recent commentary regarding the drug shortage ("Medication crisis," Jan. 5) was interesting and I'm glad this issue is getting more discussion in the lay press. It's been a thorny problem for the institutional pharmacy profession for decades. I'm a 40-year pharmacy practitioner who wonders why Congress can't empower the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for a much more active role in addressing the problem. It is often the case that large proprietary pharmaceutical manufacturers abandon active marketing of their products when those products have reached the end of their patent protection and their market is challenged by a less expensive generic product.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker | April 30, 2012
Men now have a new option to treat erectile dysfunction. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved the new drug Stendra to treat the illness that causes problems in the sex lives of 30 million men. It is the first erectile dysfunction drug in a decade. And its reacts faster than other drugs on the market meaning men may be able to add spontaneity back into the bedroom. Men take the drug, which increases blood flow to the penis, as needed 30 minutes before engaging in sex. They'll still have to take some precautions like when taking other drugs on the market.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey and Baltimore Sun reporter | January 4, 2011
From the Maryland Politics blog: The number two official at the Food and Drug Administration will join the O'Malley administration. Josh Sharfstein, the agency's Principal Deputy Commissioner would lead the state's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Gov. Martin O'Malley told Sun reporter Hanah Cho that he is "delighted" that he could lure Sharfstein from a high-profile position at the FDA. O'Malley will make a formal announcement during a press conference DHMH in Annapolis Wednesday morning.
NEWS
June 11, 1991
When Dr. David Kessler took over recently as the new head of the federal Food and Drug Administration, he inherited a budget -- $690 million -- that virtually matched that of his previous institution, the Albert Einstein Hospital in New York, where he had been chief of medicine. But there's a big difference in what those budgets must cover. Unlike a hospital, the FDA wields vast power, with its responsibility for the safety and quality of goods that make up one-quarter of the nation's gross national product.
BUSINESS
By Liz F. Kay | April 12, 2011
An adverse reaction to a beauty product might sound like a story line from a bad sitcom, but it happens in real life too. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration wants to know about any products that give you rashes, burns your scalp or turns your skin an unexpected or unintended color. You should report a bad experience even if you weren't following the directions precisely. After all, if you make a mistake, chances are other people may do it too. Many beauty products or cosmetics recommend that consumers test the item in an inconspicuous area before applying it everywhere, which is definitely good advice.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | February 21, 2014
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the first time used its legal authority to ban certain tobacco products from the market, the agency said Friday. The FDA said the maker of has ordered the maker of Sutra Bidis Red, Sutra Bidis Menthol, Sutra Bidis Red Cone and Sutra Bidis Menthol Cone to stop selling and distributing them in the United States. They are thin tobacco-filled cigarettes hand-rolled in leaves from a tendu tree and tied with a string. The FDA was given authority to regulate the manufacture, distribution and marketing of tobacco products from market under the Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act of 2009.
NEWS
January 8, 2014
Del. Dan Morhaim's recent commentary regarding the drug shortage ("Medication crisis," Jan. 5) was interesting and I'm glad this issue is getting more discussion in the lay press. It's been a thorny problem for the institutional pharmacy profession for decades. I'm a 40-year pharmacy practitioner who wonders why Congress can't empower the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for a much more active role in addressing the problem. It is often the case that large proprietary pharmaceutical manufacturers abandon active marketing of their products when those products have reached the end of their patent protection and their market is challenged by a less expensive generic product.
NEWS
By Dan K. Morhaim | January 5, 2014
The patient was found by paramedics and rushed to the hospital. He had taken over 80 aspirin tablets of 500 mg each - more than enough to be lethal. The ER staff prepared to administer the standard treatment for aspirin poisoning: sodium bicarbonate. Yes, this is the same stuff seen in movies that anxious characters take to relieve stomach upset and is followed by a burp. Chemically it's a simple, inexpensive medication and has been used for decades. In this case, the bicarbonate is a sterile solution given intravenously.
NEWS
December 12, 2013
The rise of drug-resistant bacteria is one of the more alarming health threats of the past several decades. Some of the nation's top hospitals, including one operated by the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, have experienced deadly outbreaks. Altogether, such infections kill an estimated 23,000 Americans each year, which is more than die of leukemia, Parkinson's disease or HIV/AIDS, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One factor thought to be contributing to the deadly trend is the use of antibiotics in farm animals.
NEWS
By Stacey Lee | December 3, 2013
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration recently published a draft proposal that would remedy an injury the Supreme Court dealt to generic-drug consumers two years ago in a case known as Pliva v. Mensing. In that decision, the court held that federal law prevented generic manufacturers from independently revising inadequate, inaccurate and out-of-date warning labels on their products, as the manufacturers of brand-name drugs are able to do. The ruling had the net effect of taking away any legal recourse from consumers who were harmed by those drugs because of poor safety labels.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | November 22, 2013
If the Food and Drug Administration goes ahead with its proposal to eliminate trans fats from processed food, it could create a sticky situation for Baltimore-area sweets makers, including the company that produces famed Berger cookies. The FDA will announce a final decision on banning trans fats from restaurants and packaged products on Jan. 7, but manufacturers are already preparing themselves. The baker of the Berger cookies has tasted the future and found it lacking.
HEALTH
By Kelly Brewington | kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | December 17, 2009
Ralph S. Tyler III, Maryland's insurance commissioner and a former Baltimore city solicitor, announced Wednesday he is leaving state government for a federal post as chief counsel at the Food and Drug Administration. "It was not an easy decision, but the opportunity at the FDA is certainly exciting," said Tyler, who said he brought a sharper focus to consumer protection during his tenure as insurance commissioner. "It includes the opportunity to go back to being principally a lawyer, which is how I spent my professional life, and it is what I enjoy."
HEALTH
February 17, 2010
WASHINGTON - Physicians who want to prescribe anti-anemia drugs for cancer patients will have to register and undergo training or risk losing access to the drugs, under a long-awaited risk-management plan unveiled Tuesday by the Food and Drug Administration. The company also will require physicians to collect signed statements from patients attesting that they have been informed about the dangers of the drugs, which can cause tumors to grow faster and have shortened the lives of some cancer patients.
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
The Food and Drug Administration would play a broader role in regulating specialty pharmacies, such as the one responsible for last year's deadly outbreak of meningitis, under legislation approved by Congress on Monday and expected to be signed by President Barack Obama. Lawmakers have been negotiating for months over a bill to crack down on so-called compounding pharmacies after a Massachusetts firm distributed contaminated steroids that led to the outbreak last year. Sixty-four people who received the steroid injections died, including three in Maryland, and hundreds more were injured.
HEALTH
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
After buying Fractured Prune Doughnuts in January, Dan Brinton switched to an oil without trans fats to fry the chain's hand-dipped glazed doughnuts. "It's a little more expensive, but it's certainly worth it as far as I'm concerned," said Brinton, CEO of the growing Ocean City -based chain, on Thursday. Earlier in the day, the Food and Drug Administration moved to virtually eliminate trans fat, an artificially created artery-clogging substance, from Americans' diets. The move follows a massive effort by food makers and restaurant chains to remove the substance over the past decade, as consumers become more educated about risks and vote for healthier alternatives with their wallets.
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