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By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Rumors often circulated that Tom Clancy's thrillers were so detailed in their descriptions of military and covert operations that the FBI had investigated the Baltimore novelist to determine his sources for works such as "The Hunt for Red October. " After Clancy's death in October 2013, The Baltimore Sun submitted a Freedom of Information Act request for any FBI files on Clancy. The FBI sent back 46 pages, including several redacted pages of background checks federal authorities had conducted.
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NEWS
By Justin George and The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2014
Rumors often circulated that Tom Clancy's thrillers were so detailed in their descriptions of military and covert operations that the FBI had investigated the Baltimore novelist to determine his sources for works such as "The Hunt for Red October. " After Clancy's death in October 2013, The Baltimore Sun submitted a Freedom of Information Act request for any FBI files on Clancy. The FBI sent back 46 pages, including several redacted pages of background checks federal authorities had conducted.
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NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | June 20, 1996
WASHINGTON -- College-age interns and other volunteers had free access to hundreds of FBI investigative files kept in the White House security office during the first months of the Clinton administration, according to a former key employee of the office.Although there is no evidence that information in the files was misused, the disclosure yesterday that the security office was manned by people without security clearances provided more ammunition to White House critics."A frightening breach of privacy has occurred," said Rep. Constance A. Morella, a Maryland Republican.
NEWS
By THOMAS SOWELL | May 10, 2007
Now that ABC News has the list of phone numbers given to it by the "Washington Madam," the question is: Whose names will it publicize if it finds out that there are public figures on there? Let us suppose, just for the sake of argument, that these names include Karl Rove and Sen. Edward M. Kennedy. Are both names equally likely to be revealed? That is the problem with Washington scandals. In fact, the very definition of a "scandal" varies radically depending on who is involved. That is a bigger scandal than any particular scandal the media report.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 24, 1996
WASHINGTON -- On Dec. 6, 1993, an official in the White House basement filled out a form requesting the FBI background file on a woman named Carol Blym Aarhus.The man seeking the file typed in a single word -- "access" -- to explain why he wanted the highly confidential material.But Carol Aarhus, a former Bush administration aide, didn't require access to the White House. And the acquisition of such files -- this was the first of many -- seems to have shaken the faith of some of President Clinton's fellow Democrats.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 3, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Craig Livingstone, the figure at the center of the controversy over the improper acquisition of FBI files by the Clinton White House, listed on his resume that he had supervised a campaign operation in which President Bush was heckled at a series of 1992 rallies by people dressed in chicken costumes.The chairman of the House committee investigating the acquisition of the files said Livingstone appeared to have boasted of his supervision of Chicken George and another effort to heckle Bush as part of his effort to secure the post of director of the White House security office, a position he resigned last week.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 29, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The inquiry into the Clinton administration's improper gathering of FBI background files intensified yesterday a key witness invoked his constitutional right of silence and officials disclosed that the independent counsel's office had sealed a White House file vault to protect evidence.Anthony Marceca, the former White House security worker who improperly obtained the FBI background files of hundreds of people, including dozens of prominent Republicans, exercised his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination before a Senate committee investigating the affair for political abuses and executive mismanagement.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 26, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The White House improperly received confidential FBI files on perhaps several hundred more people than previously acknowledged, computer work records show, including files on prominent members of the Bush administration foreign policy team.The documents were discovered on two computer discs used by Anthony Marceca, the civilian Army investigator detailed to the Clinton White House security office in late 1993 to help clear up a backlog of security clearances.It was not clear from the documents how many FBI files were obtained altogether.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 17, 1996
WASHINGTON -- A Senate committee voted yesterday to subpoena a central player in the White House FBI files case and force him to provide sworn testimony in a closed hearing later this week.Anthony Marceca, who said he will invoke his Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination and refuse to answer questions, also was ordered to turn over to the Senate Judiciary Committee all of the government documents and computer disks he took home after serving as a temporary White House security official.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 8, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Investigators for Kenneth W. Starr, the Whitewater independent counsel, have begun checking the fingerprints on hundreds of confidential FBI files improperly acquired by the Clinton White House, law enforcement and congressional officials said yesterday.The examination of who might have handled the materials, the officials said, could provide crucial answers to some questions surrounding the improper acquisition of files on nearly 900 former White House workers and officials, among them dozens of prominent Republicans.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Sun Book Editor | June 5, 2005
The Informant: The FBI, The Ku Klux Klan, and the Murder of Viola Liuzzo By Gary May. Yale University Press. 432 pages. $35. Gary Thomas Rowe Jr. was the FBI's man on the inside of the Klan. Inside and up close. Very close. Rowe had a knack for being in the vicinity of just about every conflagration of racial violence in the virulently segregated Alabama of the early 1960s. He was around for beatings, bombings, ultimately even murder. Many in the FBI, including J. Edgar Hoover himself, considered Rowe an incomparable asset in the war against racist extremists.
NEWS
By John M. Glionna and John M. Glionna,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 7, 2004
CORTE MADERA, Calif. - The boxes of confidential FBI documents lie scattered about author Gerald Nicosia's kitchen like so many unopened prizes. Twelve feet high when stacked, they are a monument, he says, to democracy gone wrong. They are also his cross to bear. For weeks now, the documents have created havoc in the historian's staid suburban life. Instead of shepherding the kids between school and baseball games while he works on his newest project - a book about racism and the death penalty - Nicosia has been pulled into the mystery surrounding the U.S. government's spying on its citizens more than a generation ago. Twenty thousand pages in all, detailing FBI surveillance of Vietnam War protesters in the 1970s, the files were obtained by Nicosia in 1998 after an 11-year battle with the agency over their release.
NEWS
By Tom Gorman and Tom Gorman,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 12, 2002
DENVER - Sister Antonia Anthony, 74, found herself in the files, characterized as a member of a "criminal extremist group." Great-grandmother Helen Henry, 82, was in there too, with the notation that her Toyota sedan bore a "Free Leonard Peltier" bumper sticker. Both had aroused the suspicions of the Denver Police Department, which maintained dossiers on about 3,200 individuals and 208 organizations that it believed bore watching. When the files were discovered this spring, the ensuing uproar, from the mayor on down, compelled the department to get rid of them.
NEWS
By Thomas Healy and Thomas Healy,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 8, 2001
WASHINGTON - A federal appeals court denied Timothy J. McVeigh's request yesterday to postpone his execution, and attorneys for the Oklahoma City bomber said McVeigh had decided against any further appeals and was ready to be executed as scheduled Monday. The court's ruling, and McVeigh's decision, appeared to bring to an end the whirl of legal proceedings that began a little less than a month ago after the FBI revealed that it had withheld thousands of pages of documents from McVeigh's attorneys before his 1997 trial.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 15, 2001
WASHINGTON - A second batch of undisclosed records in the Oklahoma City bombing has been found in Baltimore, sources said yesterday, prompting the FBI to send out a worldwide directive ordering all bureau field offices and attaches to comb their files for any more documents that might not have been turned over to lawyers for Timothy J. McVeigh. Meanwhile, new details emerged about the contents of more than 3,000 pages of documents found last week - witness statements and photographs relating to a mysterious character known as Robert Jacques, as well as surveillance tapes of sightings of "John Doe No. 2," an alleged Mc- Veigh co-conspirator.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | July 23, 2000
Francis Albert Sinatra was America's consummate crooner, a natural musician of rare genius who lives on as an immortal entertainer. As actor, businessman, playboy, political manipulator and gambler, he seldom left the forefront of public awareness and influence. Distressed by elements of that influence, law enforcement officials also kept a close and constant watch on Sinatra. The FBI began its files on Sinatra in 1943. It kept actively compiling reports and memos on him at least until J. Edgar Hoover died in 1972.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 27, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Craig Livingstone quit his White House job without ceremony yesterday and soon sat seething with anger before a congressional hearing as Democrat and Republican alike lambasted him for ineptness in the handling of hundreds of FBI files at the heart of the capital's latest political controversy.Livingstone should have resigned as head of the White House personnel security office "a long time ago," said one of the Clinton administration's defenders, Rep. Tom Lantos, who dripped sarcasm in accusing him of overseeing "stupid actions" and an "idiotic" mess.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond and Jack W. Germond,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 4, 1996
WILKES-BARRE, Pa. -- "I just hustle windows, I don't worry about politics or that foolishness in Washington," says Al Rogowski, unloading his panel truck. "My boss sells the windows and I install 'em, so I don't have time to pay attention to who's doing what in Washington, and I don't imagine for a minute it would be any different if this other fellow gets in."Maureen Gallagher, pushing her squirming 2-year-old son in a shopping cart, has a similar plague-on-both-their-houses attitude. "I must say," she says, "that President Clinton isn't setting a very good example, but I don't suppose Dole would be any better."
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | June 4, 2000
MINISTER Carlos Muhammad sat behind his desk on the second floor of Muhammad's Mosque No. 6 on Garrison Boulevard, just down the street from Liberty Heights Avenue. He paused for only a second when the question was put to him: What, exactly, is the media's motive for rehashing the issue of Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan's "involvement" in the assassination of Malcolm X? "I think Minister Farrakhan being the leader he is, is the main reason," Muhammad responded. "His influence has warranted those in high places to bring out things that are false.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 14, 2000
"Farrakhan admits complicity in Malcolm X's murder to his daughter." So ran the headline of a story in Thursday's edition of The Sun, telling of a "60 Minutes" interview scheduled to run on CBS tonight. If you just went by the headline you would think there was something startling and new in the article. But a reading reveals there's nothing new at all -- that all Farrakhan said was that, through his circa 1965 rhetoric, he helped contribute to the atmosphere of intolerance and hatred that culminated in Malcolm X dying in a broadside of assassins' bullets at the Audobon Ballroom.
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