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By Chris Kaltenbach | September 15, 1997
The folks at Turner wish Fay Wray a happy birthday (she turned 90 Wednesday) with an evening-long tribute including "Captain Thunder" (8 p.m.), from 1931, with Fay playing second fiddle to a Mexican bandit; "Doctor X" (9: 30 p.m.), from 1932, with Lionel Atwill; "King Kong" (11 p.m.), from 1933, something about a monkey and only the greatest film ever made; "One Sunday Afternoon" (1 a.m.), also from 1933, with Gary Cooper; "Viva Villa!" (2: 30 a.m.), from 1934, with Wallace Beery; and "Richest Girl In the World" (4: 30 a.m.)
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 10, 2004
Director Merian C. Cooper promised her the tallest, darkest leading man in Hollywood. He wasn't kidding. Actress Fay Wray, the famously unrequited love of a 50-foot ape named Kong, died Sunday at her Manhattan apartment. She was 96. "She went as she was going off to sleep, and it was painless and completely comfortable," said film director and friend Rick McKay, who had been with her the night before. "It's really and truly the kind of way you want a leading lady to die in a film." Although she made nearly 100 movies in a career spanning 35 years, Wray today is remembered only for one. But 1933's King Kong, the story of a god-like beast taken from his Skull Island lair and thrust unwillingly into civilized New York, all for the love of a woman, wasn't just any movie, and Wray's performance as the screaming object of the big monkey's affection wasn't just any role.
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By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 10, 2004
Director Merian C. Cooper promised her the tallest, darkest leading man in Hollywood. He wasn't kidding. Actress Fay Wray, the famously unrequited love of a 50-foot ape named Kong, died Sunday at her Manhattan apartment. She was 96. "She went as she was going off to sleep, and it was painless and completely comfortable," said film director and friend Rick McKay, who had been with her the night before. "It's really and truly the kind of way you want a leading lady to die in a film." Although she made nearly 100 movies in a career spanning 35 years, Wray today is remembered only for one. But 1933's King Kong, the story of a god-like beast taken from his Skull Island lair and thrust unwillingly into civilized New York, all for the love of a woman, wasn't just any movie, and Wray's performance as the screaming object of the big monkey's affection wasn't just any role.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | September 15, 1997
The folks at Turner wish Fay Wray a happy birthday (she turned 90 Wednesday) with an evening-long tribute including "Captain Thunder" (8 p.m.), from 1931, with Fay playing second fiddle to a Mexican bandit; "Doctor X" (9: 30 p.m.), from 1932, with Lionel Atwill; "King Kong" (11 p.m.), from 1933, something about a monkey and only the greatest film ever made; "One Sunday Afternoon" (1 a.m.), also from 1933, with Gary Cooper; "Viva Villa!" (2: 30 a.m.), from 1934, with Wallace Beery; and "Richest Girl In the World" (4: 30 a.m.)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1995
Sixty-two years ago, Kong, the eighth wonder of the world, made his disastrous New York debut, breaking his chains, wreaking havoc on the streets of New York and carrying Fay Wray all the way to the top of the Empire State Building before some pesky biplanes got the better of him. Big apes still don't come any better -- as proven by his disastrous return to the big screen 20 years ago. Watch TNT and see just what I'm talking about.* "A Charlie Brown Christmas" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1997
Joan Crawford running around in her underwear? Scandalous.Barbara Stanwyck openly sleeping her way to the top? Outrageous.King Kong peeling away Fay Wray's clothes? Why, the public must be protected.And protected they were, by the Hollywood Production Code, an invention grounded in the '20s that was enforced in the '30s and kept American movie houses relatively free of scandalous behavior until the '60s. The code saw to it that female bosoms remained covered, excessive violence went unshown, suggestive dancing was eliminated and neither crime nor sexual promiscuity ever paid.
NEWS
By NICHOLAS KING | June 19, 1991
New York. -- The Empire State Building is 60 years old. It might as well be 600, the original skyscraper from the city's Middle Ages, a monument gone from our comprehension.Needle-straight, it rises monumentally through change and through storm, presiding without expression over the city it represents around the world. Apart from the Statue of Liberty, which is more of a national monument anyway, it is the foremost symbol of New York.The Empire State at 102 stories and even with a television tower on top of that has been surpassed in height here and elsewhere.
NEWS
August 10, 2004
NATIONAL Nichols sorrowful at sentencing Oklahoma City bombing conspirator Terry Nichols, a jailhouse convert to Christianity, pledged his allegiance to God in his first courtroom statement and expressed sorrow for victims and survivors of the blast "for the grief they have all suffered." He was sentenced yesterday to 161 life sentences. [Page 1a] `Time' reporter won't testify A federal judge held Matthew Cooper, a reporter for Time, in contempt of court yesterday for refusing to testify before a grand jury investigating the leak of the identity of a covert CIA officer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | April 4, 1999
The Matrix," a cautionary tale about what happens when the machines take over, promises a movie experience like no other. It's a claim the film lives up to, thanks in large part to special effects that enable bullets to stop in midair, combatants to defy gravity and kung-fu kicks to be delivered with lightning speed and precision (by someone who's not Jackie Chan). But "The Matrix" isn't the first film to promise the never-before-experienced. Here are a half-dozen others that lived up to their advance billing.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | December 11, 2005
When it comes to King Kong, why not leave well-enough alone? At first blush, it would seem difficult to improve upon this extraordinary American film, the story of a giant gorilla and his unrequited love for a beautiful blonde. Images from the film have become mainstays of popular culture: Kong roaring at an attacking tyrannosaurus, Kong astride the New York skyline with a terrified Fay Wray dangling from his oversized paw, Kong plummeting to his death from atop the Empire State Building.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 23, 1997
Joan Crawford running around in her underwear? Scandalous.Barbara Stanwyck openly sleeping her way to the top? Outrageous.King Kong peeling away Fay Wray's clothes? Why, the public must be protected.And protected they were, by the Hollywood Production Code, an invention grounded in the '20s that was enforced in the '30s and kept American movie houses relatively free of scandalous behavior until the '60s. The code saw to it that female bosoms remained covered, excessive violence went unshown, suggestive dancing was eliminated and neither crime nor sexual promiscuity ever paid.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | December 6, 1995
Sixty-two years ago, Kong, the eighth wonder of the world, made his disastrous New York debut, breaking his chains, wreaking havoc on the streets of New York and carrying Fay Wray all the way to the top of the Empire State Building before some pesky biplanes got the better of him. Big apes still don't come any better -- as proven by his disastrous return to the big screen 20 years ago. Watch TNT and see just what I'm talking about.* "A Charlie Brown Christmas" (8 p.m.-8:30 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
NEWS
By NICHOLAS KING | June 19, 1991
New York. -- The Empire State Building is 60 years old. It might as well be 600, the original skyscraper from the city's Middle Ages, a monument gone from our comprehension.Needle-straight, it rises monumentally through change and through storm, presiding without expression over the city it represents around the world. Apart from the Statue of Liberty, which is more of a national monument anyway, it is the foremost symbol of New York.The Empire State at 102 stories and even with a television tower on top of that has been surpassed in height here and elsewhere.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | October 31, 1996
Boo."Friends" (8 p.m.-8: 30 p.m., WBAL, Channel 11) -- Chandler's grate-on-your nerves girlfriend, Janice, asks a question that gets them all thinking about when they first got together (and were jTC only making $30,000 an episode). Look out, gang, it's flashback time. NBC."Diagnosis Murder" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Dr. Sloan is nearly killed in a terrorist attack, but never fear: Guest star Tracey Gold is on hand to get to the bottom of all the nasty goings-on. CBS."Hercules: The Legendary Journeys" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., WNUV, Channel 54)
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | November 20, 2005
THE KING KONG COLLECTION / / Warner Home Video / $39.95 More than 70 years have passed since that big ape took a liking to that lissome blond, and still, monster movies don't come any better than the original King Kong -- heck, movies don't come any better than the original King Kong, but that's just this critic's opinion. Safe to say that few American films have gained such an iconic status, or influenced more future filmmakers (including Peter Jackson, whose own take on Kong opens Dec. 14)
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