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By Peter Schmuck and Peter Schmuck,Staff Writer | January 29, 1993
In the window of the Carpenter Street Saloon is a makeshift sign that echoes the collective sentiment of both patrons and passers-by. Painted on pink poster board is a large No. 3 and a simple congratulatory message for a small town's favorite son.It might seem cryptic to the out-of-staters who come to sample the seafood and the serenity of this picturesque Eastern Shore town, but, to the locals, there is no explanation necessary. Harold Baines has come home for good.Not that he ever really left.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2013
"I Am Divine," a documentary on the life and career of Baltimore's favorite home-grown drag queen, was to make its debut Saturday night at the South by Southwest arts festival in Austin, Texas. Director Jeffrey Schwarz, interviewed for SXSW's online program, calls his film "the story of how an overweight, effeminate, bullied Baltimore kid transformed himself into an internationally recognized drag superstar. " The documentary includes interviews with director John Waters, who featured Divine in many of his early films and for whom his boyhood friend served as something of a muse, as well as Ricki Lake (Divine's daughter in "Hairspray")
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FEATURES
By BRIAN DOWNES and BRIAN DOWNES,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | October 15, 1995
Writer-journalist Damon Runyon summed him up best when he called Will Rogers "America's most accomplished human document. One-third humor. One-third humanitarian. One-third heart."Rogers described himself more modestly: "My humor is not so hot, my philosophy don't philo, and my jokes are pre-war, but my feelings toward mankind is 100 per cent."That was just the tonic Depression-weary Americans needed and why the much quoted Rogers remains a national icon.Rogers was mighty proud of his Oklahoma roots, and said so at every opportunity.
NEWS
April 18, 2011
Baltimore's favorite son, greatest cheerleader and most irascible politician is gone. By any measure, William Donald Schaefer, who died Monday at age 89, was an extraordinary man. Sixteen years on the Baltimore City Council, 15 as the city's mayor, eight as Maryland governor and another eight as comptroller — few have had as much impact in shaping the city and state. He could be demanding, testy, mercurial, insufferable really. His mantra was "do it now," and he didn't mean next week or even the next day. As much as he appreciated publicity, he didn't always care for the reporters and editors who covered him — and wasn't shy about saying so. The salute he offered many of them required only one finger.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 22, 1996
RUSSELL, Kan. -- Like the hard red winter wheat that is its lifeblood, this lonely town on the prairie is waiting to bloom.At least, that's the view of some in wind-swept Russell, Kan., where Bob Dole was born 73 years ago today. The actual spot where he entered the world is no longer standing: his family's three-room house, not much bigger than a shack, beside the Union Pacific railroad tracks -- on the wrong side of the tracks, as Dole has said.Other landmarks from his early days remain, though.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,SUN STAFF | March 1, 1998
The high regard that Rodney Elliott's teammates have for him was evident in the effort that they put into his curtain call at the Baltimore Arena yesterday.Elliott is a favorite son fostered by one of the city's institutions, Dunbar High basketball, and his final regular-season game for Maryland turned into a celebration. The senior scored 20 points and snatched a career-high 17 rebounds, as the Terps pounded the No. 24 Temple Owls, 83-66, for their third straight win, and their most decisive of 1998.
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | August 10, 1992
GEORGE BUSH told USA Today last week that Indiana's favorite son definitely would be on the ticket.Well, actually, he told the paper that Dan Quayle would be on the ticket. I'm not sure Dan is Indiana's favorite son. Also last week, Fort Wayne Journal-Gazette political writer Brian Howey wrote, "many Hoosiers have been saying under their breath for four years now [that] George Bush picked the wrong Indiana senator to be his vice president. If Bush could get beyond his blinding loyalty, realize that people don't want Quayle a heartbeat away from a 68-year-old chief of state, he would find a cabinet post for the veep and give [Indiana Sen. Richard]
NEWS
By Elise Armacost | May 26, 1996
THE LADY -- fiftyish, perhaps-- walked up to the microphone in the middle of the Dundalk Community College gym, identified herself as ''just your average hard-working American,'' looked up at Republican Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and called him ''Bob.'' He might have been her favorite son.For that matter, he might have been the favorite son of every Eastsider packed into the DCC gym May 17 to protest the settlement of an ACLU lawsuit that will help 1,300 poor, black families move to the suburbs.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | March 15, 1998
HALLANDALE, Fla. -- In his first race in four months, and first wearing the crown of Horse of the Year, Favorite Trick drove through horses in the stretch to win the Swale Stakes yesterday at Gulfstream Park.The victory in the seven-furlong Swale extended Favorite Trick's win streak to nine -- he has never lost -- and it answered the question of how the horse has fared under his new trainer, Bill Mott. But it revealed little about the chances of this son of a sprinter to win, or even reach, the country's most prestigious race, the Kentucky Derby.
NEWS
April 18, 2011
Baltimore's favorite son, greatest cheerleader and most irascible politician is gone. By any measure, William Donald Schaefer, who died Monday at age 89, was an extraordinary man. Sixteen years on the Baltimore City Council, 15 as the city's mayor, eight as Maryland governor and another eight as comptroller — few have had as much impact in shaping the city and state. He could be demanding, testy, mercurial, insufferable really. His mantra was "do it now," and he didn't mean next week or even the next day. As much as he appreciated publicity, he didn't always care for the reporters and editors who covered him — and wasn't shy about saying so. The salute he offered many of them required only one finger.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, Baltimore Sun | October 10, 2010
Dee Tana loved Sunday's Columbus Day celebration, loved the Italian military band that came all the way from Rome to play, the dignitaries who laid wreaths at the foot of the Columbus monument, the five-block procession from St. Leo's to Columbus Plaza off President Street. "It's all about our pride," she said, echoing the sentiment of many of the dozens of Baltimore's Italian-Americans who gathered on the western edge of Little Italy to celebrate one of the old country's favorite sons.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2010
For Baltimore musician Warren Cherry, Frank Zappa was an inspiration — an artist who stubbornly went his own way and fought to protect artistic freedom. Sunday, Cherry and several hundred other Zappa fans went to Highlandtown to pay homage to the late rocker. "I've been a fan of Zappa since I was a teenager," says Cherry, 57. "He was just such an iconoclastic guy, and so unique. I mean, my gosh, just with the way he looked, with the hair and the goatee. I was an outsider, I was an artist, I was a musician.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Matthew Hay Brown and Stephanie Desmon and Matthew Hay Brown and,stephanie.desmon@baltsun.com and matthew.brown@baltsun.com | December 16, 2008
Dr. Joshua M. Sharfstein, Baltimore's outspoken health commissioner, is regarded by many as a leading candidate to head the Food and Drug Administration. Sharfstein is a former congressional staffer who carved out a national profile by convincing drug companies to stop marketing cough and cold medicines to young children. The 39-year-old pediatrician has been spending two days a week in Washington lately as one of a handful of people reviewing health policies for President-elect Barack Obama's transition team.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporter | August 15, 2008
Parents and children have been staying up way past their bedtimes to watch the live broadcasts of his races. Working professionals who don't normally obsess over swimming have found themselves ducking away from their desks to catch even the preliminary heats during the day. And swim clubs and swimsuit retailers across the area say their pools and shops are abuzz with talk of Michael Phelps and his history-making performance this week in Beijing. "Oh my gosh, I've been up until 12:30 in the morning almost every night," said Katie Berman, a 27-year-old elementary school teacher who lives in Canton.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN REPORTER | July 29, 2007
COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. -- Cal Ripken Jr.'s lifelong love affair with Baltimore and baseball, which began at the knee of his father and ran through 20 years of playing and one incredible streak, will reach another pinnacle today - the Hall of Fame. "It still feels a little like a fantasy," Ripken said yesterday morning. His accomplishments go well beyond the record of 2,632 consecutive games - a streak that spanned 17 years. His blend of size, power and sure-handed defense redefined the shortstop position and made him a perennial All-Star.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Mary Gail Hare and Madison Park and Mary Gail Hare,Sun reporters | June 24, 2007
Aberdeen's favorite son received a hero's welcome last week -- in Bel Air. In the days leading up to Harford County's Cal Ripken Day festivities, questions arose about why the parade was held in Bel Air, the county seat, instead of Aberdeen, Ripken's hometown and the home of his minor league IronBirds. "Everyone has wondered why the event was not in Ripken's hometown," said County Councilman James V. McMahan Jr., a Republican from Bel Air who for 10 years served as curator of Aberdeen's Ripken Museum.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | February 10, 2006
Turin, Italy-- --The winter's first big Olympic scandal is about to arrive. It's scheduled to leave the United States late Sunday night and touch down in Italy the next day. Everyone's already abuzz about its arrival. This isn't just a pretty good scandal. This is The Great One. A gambling investigation has threatened to take a sport that was on its knees and put it on ice. The waves that battered the NHL this week will fully douse the Winter Games when Wayne Gretzky, the executive director of Team Canada, arrives in town.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,SUN STAFF | June 29, 1999
TAKOMA PARK -- Steve Francis grew up in this leafy suburban enclave of high-rise apartments and graceful Victorian homes. He played pickup basketball games in the modern community center and in the cellar of the city's 70-year-old stone firehouse.Now, on the eve of the National Basketball Association draft in which Francis might be taken as the No. 1 pick, Takoma Park residents of all ages say they are rooting for their favorite son -- providing he remembers his roots."I'm proud of him, as long as he's a good role model and makes these kids care about their lives and values," said Rebecca Brown, 57, town librarian.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | February 10, 2006
Turin, Italy-- --The winter's first big Olympic scandal is about to arrive. It's scheduled to leave the United States late Sunday night and touch down in Italy the next day. Everyone's already abuzz about its arrival. This isn't just a pretty good scandal. This is The Great One. A gambling investigation has threatened to take a sport that was on its knees and put it on ice. The waves that battered the NHL this week will fully douse the Winter Games when Wayne Gretzky, the executive director of Team Canada, arrives in town.
SPORTS
By JAMISON HENSLEY and JAMISON HENSLEY,SUN REPORTER | February 2, 2006
DETROIT-- --Eight miles from pristine Ford Field - site of Sunday's Super Bowl - there is Jerome Bettis' crumbling neighborhood. There is a slew of boarded-up, charred houses. There are graffiti on some and caved-in roofs on others. There are broken liquor bottles on the sidewalks and beat-up cars in the streets. Except this week, there is a sense of hope in this decaying part of town, especially in the halls of the Pittsburgh Steelers running back's own Mackenzie High School. The message being instilled, as one teacher put it, is to follow The Bus. "It's always a positive thing to know somebody in the neighborhood survived," said Dwight Thomas, Bettis' physical education teacher who still works at the school.
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