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By HANAH CHO | May 7, 2008
Is your turkey sandwich or fruit snack missing from the office fridge? The so-called fridge raid is a reality, so much so that it was ranked as the No. 1 worst office etiquette faux pas, according to a recent survey by TheLadders.com, a job site for executives. Nearly 98 percent of respondents said eating someone else's food from the office fridge was unacceptable, while 96 percent said bad hygiene was a no-no. The survey, with a margin of error of 1.9 percentage points, polled 2,520 executives.
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NEWS
June 16, 2014
Am I the only one that sees the irony in attorney general candidate Del. Jon Cardin attending a fundraiser hosted by a recently disbarred attorney? This speaks more to Mr. Cardin's character than his acceptance of a $100 campaign contribution from rapper Ski Money, a.k.a. Lawrence S. Christian ( "Jon Cardin rejects rapper's support after learning of criminal charges," June 5). One can see how Mr. Cardin might be unaware of Mr. Christian's past, but he surely cannot plead ignorance of lawyer Paul Gardner's past.
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BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun Columnist | November 8, 2006
You often hear stories of workers inadvertently sending an e-mail meant for a colleague to the entire office, or even worse - to their boss. The e-mail's content is often embarrassing or reveals not-so-flattering comments about a co-worker or a manager. Workplace experts say these faux pas happen more often than we'd like, considering we've become increasingly lax about e-mail usage. Who hasn't absent-mindedly hit the "reply all" button or forwarded e-mail messages to the wrong person in the course of doing a million other things?
NEWS
December 6, 2011
The conviction of Paul Schurick, the aide to former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., on charges of election fraud is a sad end to a long career in Maryland politics. Mr. Schurick served this city and state long and well (much of it under the auspices of the late William Donald Schaefer), and it is a shame that the good he has done is now overshadowed. But it would also be difficult to imagine a jury coming to any different conclusion. The basic facts of the case were never in dispute.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | July 4, 2002
It's not that the folks at the city's Department of Public Works or at Baltimore's Circuit Courthouse don't take pride in the Maryland state flag. They just didn't realize the flag at Courthouse East on Calvert Street was flying upside down. "I know it's upside down because I have a Maryland flag that I display at my house, and I know how it's supposed to be hung," said Circuit Judge Joseph McCurdy. "I don't know who's responsible for that, but I think they ought to just take it down and rehang it. It's probably just a mistake."
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | April 22, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Assistant Secretary of State Ellen R. Sauerbrey, whose socially conservative views came in for scrutiny when President Bush picked her for the diplomatic post, is being criticized for her plan to speak at a conference in Poland for opponents of abortion and same-sex marriage. Nineteen members of the European Parliament have asked Sauerbrey to reconsider her scheduled appearance at the World Congress of Families next month in Warsaw. The members of the European Parliamentary Working Group on Separation of Religion and Politics say that several people scheduled to speak at the three-day conference have taken positions that clash with the European Charter of Fundamental Rights.
NEWS
June 16, 2014
Am I the only one that sees the irony in attorney general candidate Del. Jon Cardin attending a fundraiser hosted by a recently disbarred attorney? This speaks more to Mr. Cardin's character than his acceptance of a $100 campaign contribution from rapper Ski Money, a.k.a. Lawrence S. Christian ( "Jon Cardin rejects rapper's support after learning of criminal charges," June 5). One can see how Mr. Cardin might be unaware of Mr. Christian's past, but he surely cannot plead ignorance of lawyer Paul Gardner's past.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | June 8, 2003
It is time once again for Ask Mister Language Person, the column that provides you with the grammar, punctuation and vocabulary skills you need to verbally crush your opponents like seedless grapes under a hammer. Today's first language question comes from author Joyce Carol Oates, who writes to ask: Q. At restaurants, I often order the soup du jour. My question is, what is "jour?" A. It is a French word meaning "bat spleens." Q. Speaking of restaurants, can you give an example of pretentious menu language?
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | January 25, 2002
Charlotte Gray is a freeze-dried version of Sebastian Faulks' juicy novel about a passionate young Scotswoman who enlists with British intelligence and serves as a courier and go-between with the French Resistance during World War II. On paper it has a lot going for it, including high-stakes espionage and romance, and characters capable of holding more than one ideal or loyalty. But the director, Gillian Armstrong, and her writer, Jeremy Brock, operate more like concept artists here than dramatists.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | July 1, 2001
What lies ahead for the European Union? This question is very much on the minds of concerned journalists looking for a way to take a tax-deductible vacation abroad. For this reason, I recently spent several weeks assessing the mood in a broad cross-section of Europe, ranging all the way from Paris, France, to several other parts of France. I would say, based on this trip, that the biggest problem facing Europe today is that everything over there is hard to pronounce. Even the word "France" is pronounced as a different word entirely ("Fwonce")
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | December 5, 2011
The attorney for former Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s campaign manager made his final pitch to a Baltimore jury Monday, arguing that his client, Paul Schurick, simply made a "mistake" when he authorized an Election Day 2010 robocall that prosecutors say was designed to suppress black votes. "We made a faux pas," Schurick's attorney, A. Dwight Pettit, said of the call. "That's not criminal. That's evidence of somebody who made a political misjudgment, a political faux pas, a political mistake.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg and Kevin Van Valkenburg,SUN REPORTER | June 4, 2008
The words you are reading right now were typed by a man whose leg muscles feel like lumpy mashed potatoes. His shoulders ache like someone gave him a deep tissue massage with a jackhammer and a bowling ball. He fell asleep at his desk twice while trying to finish this paragraph. That man, sadly, is me. With the McDonald's LPGA Championship taking place at Bulle Rock this week, I had the bright idea to see if one of the professionals might be foolish enough to let me be her caddie during the Monday pro-am.
BUSINESS
By HANAH CHO | May 7, 2008
Is your turkey sandwich or fruit snack missing from the office fridge? The so-called fridge raid is a reality, so much so that it was ranked as the No. 1 worst office etiquette faux pas, according to a recent survey by TheLadders.com, a job site for executives. Nearly 98 percent of respondents said eating someone else's food from the office fridge was unacceptable, while 96 percent said bad hygiene was a no-no. The survey, with a margin of error of 1.9 percentage points, polled 2,520 executives.
TRAVEL
By San Jose (Calif.) Mercury News | September 9, 2007
I'm traveling to Paris and can't imagine leaving my comfortable Crocs shoes at home. But I don't want to brand myself as an American tourist. Do the French wear Crocs? We checked with our sources at the French Government Tourist Office in New York, who said Crocs - colorful, casual footwear that resembles Dutch clogs - are definitely not a fashion statement among Parisians. However, they've been spotted on feet (and in stores) along the Riviera, so if you're headed that way, you'll be fine.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown and Matthew Hay Brown,Sun Reporter | April 22, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Assistant Secretary of State Ellen R. Sauerbrey, whose socially conservative views came in for scrutiny when President Bush picked her for the diplomatic post, is being criticized for her plan to speak at a conference in Poland for opponents of abortion and same-sex marriage. Nineteen members of the European Parliament have asked Sauerbrey to reconsider her scheduled appearance at the World Congress of Families next month in Warsaw. The members of the European Parliamentary Working Group on Separation of Religion and Politics say that several people scheduled to speak at the three-day conference have taken positions that clash with the European Charter of Fundamental Rights.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,Sun Columnist | November 8, 2006
You often hear stories of workers inadvertently sending an e-mail meant for a colleague to the entire office, or even worse - to their boss. The e-mail's content is often embarrassing or reveals not-so-flattering comments about a co-worker or a manager. Workplace experts say these faux pas happen more often than we'd like, considering we've become increasingly lax about e-mail usage. Who hasn't absent-mindedly hit the "reply all" button or forwarded e-mail messages to the wrong person in the course of doing a million other things?
NEWS
By Kimberly A.C. Wilson and Kimberly A.C. Wilson,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2003
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. - When sniper suspect John Allen Muhammad demanded the right to represent himself at trial yesterday, he joined a fraternity of pro se capital murder defendants that includes hippie-era cult leader Charles Manson and serial killer Ted Bundy. Muhammad's entrance into his case added an unexpected twist already being analyzed by legal experts around the country. Within his first moments before the jury, Muhammad made legal and verbal faux pas - his confidently delivered defense remarks, for instance, were peppered with grammatical mistakes.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2000
Jack Mann, a veteran sportswriter specializing in baseball and horse racing during a storied career that included an award-winning stint at The Evening Sun, died yesterday of cancer at Howard County General Hospital. He was 74 and lived in Laurel. During a career that began in high school in 1940, Mr. Mann worked for numerous publications, including Newsday from 1952 to 1962, where he became sports editor; the Detroit Free Press from 1962 to 1963; the New York Herald-Tribune from 1963 to 1965; Sports Illustrated from 1965 to 1967; the Miami Herald from 1968 to 1970; the Washington Daily News from 1970 to 1971; the Washington Star from 1971 to 1972, when it folded, then briefly for the Washington Times.
NEWS
September 20, 2006
When Pope John Paul II died last year, the need for his successor to engage with the Islamic world was widely discussed. The "clash of civilizations" paradigm had already been invoked because of the war in Iraq. The Vatican was concerned about the treatment of Christians in South Asia, and Islamic fundamentalism was on the rise in Europe. But the new pope, Benedict XVI, has relied on candor, not diplomacy, in these matters. His frankness won't advance understanding if Muslims view him as unduly critical of their faith.
NEWS
By MARJORIE VALBRUN | October 29, 2005
WHERE IS Mr. Blackwell when you need him? You would think National Basketball Association Commissioner David Stern would have had the good sense, or at least the good taste, to enlist the well-known arbiter of high fashion to help explain the league's new dress code before sending players, sports writers and fans into apoplectic fits over a policy that is routine in normal workplaces. Instead, everybody was left to come up with disparate interpretations of the policy requiring players to wear "business casual attire" when "engaged in team or league business."
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