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NEWS
January 13, 1997
Nine Carroll County residents were hospitalized yesterday after a faulty -- and illegal -- kerosene space heater sent carbon monoxide wafting through their apartment building, leaving some gasping for air, authorities said.One of the nine had a history of asthma and was treated at Maryland Shock Trauma Center.Kerosene heaters are illegal in commercial structures or buildings with three or more apartments. But fire officials say they found a heater in the Union Bridge apartment, apparently installed to keep pipes from freezing.
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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | August 1, 2014
The speed camera company blasted in Baltimore for issuing tickets to people who weren't speeding is now facing criticism in Howard County, where it submitted a year's worth of inaccurate data about the program there. Data submitted by Xerox State & Local Solutions for the county's four cameras repeatedly listed more vehicles speeding than there were cars on the road, according to documents reviewed by The Baltimore Sun. The 2013 data sometimes reported that 200 percent, 400 percent or even 600 percent of the number of cars that passed by a camera were speeding.
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NEWS
October 15, 1998
A faulty underground electrical line resulted in a power outage affecting more than 900 customers in Columbia yesterday.Four traffic lights near Town Center were affected, authorities said.The cause of the outage -- which started about 1: 30 p.m. -- was under investigation, but power had been restored to most of the customers by 2: 15 p.m., said Nancy Caplan, a spokeswoman for Baltimore Gas and Electric Co.The outage was confined to businesses and homes along Little Patuxent and Governor Warfield parkways, Caplan said.
NEWS
April 8, 2014
We have learned the deaths of 13 people due to a faulty ignition part/switch in General Motors vehicles could have perhaps have been avoided. Pathetically, the situation could have possibly been averted by simply adding a two-dollar part to each ignition in those automobiles. Repeat, a two-dollar part. The deaths of 13 people (or more) was caused by the unwillingness to add a two-dollar part per vehicle? All this hot mess, loss of life and limb, for a two-dollar part per vehicle?
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,Staff Writer | May 13, 1993
Howard County police discovered that two-thirds of the commercial trucks they inspected during random safety stops earlier this week had some type of brake defect.The inspections follow a fatal accident almost two weeks ago in which a dump truck crashed into several cars at a busy Columbia intersection. A 43-year-old woman died in the accident and her 12-year-old son remains in critical condition.Police said the truck had faulty brakes.The problem "happens more frequently than we know about," said Owen Smith, the Police Department's commercial truck inspector.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1996
A faulty electrical outlet in a living room was blamed for starting a small fire yesterday in an Elkridge home, a Howard County fire spokesman said.There were no reported injuries from the single-alarm fire, which was reported at about 11 a.m. yesterday in a single-family home in the 6700 block of Athol Ave., said Sgt. Robert Wiseman, a spokesman for the county Fire Department.The fire was declared under control at 11:23 a.m. and extinguished at 11:35 a.m. Structural damage was estimated at $1,500, Sergeant Wiseman said.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 22, 1998
The two-alarm fire that killed an Elkridge artist and destroyed her split-level home Jan. 12 was caused by furnace exhaust heat that escaped through a faulty joint and then ignited floorboards.W. Faron Taylor, deputy chief fire marshal, said that Florence Riefle Bahr, 88, died of carbon monoxide poisoning, consistent with what apparently was a slow, smoldering fire that eventually became a raging blaze. It took firefighters 50 minutes to control the fire.Taylor said a joint in the furnace's pipe, in the ceiling of the basement, broke some time ago, allowing heat to penetrate the floorboards of the house in the 6000 block of Old Lawyer's Hill Road.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1996
State police, hoping to curb the amount of time and money troopers spend responding to false burglar alarms in Carroll County, are going to fine repeat offenders.The warning comes from Lt. Larry Faries, commander of the Westminster barracks, who said the number of false burglar alarms in the county is increasing. He said 15 of 1,628 burglar alarms through Sept. 30 this year were valid.He estimated troopers will spend 542 man-hours on false burglar alarms in 1996. Those are hours taken from other calls.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,melissa.harris@baltsun.com | May 13, 2009
A 53-year-old man was sentenced Tuesday to 15 years in prison after pleading guilty to strangling and beating to death a woman with whom he had exchanged drugs for sex and who had asked him to restore power to her apartment. Anthony L. Thompson of the 4900 block of Arabia Ave. accepted the plea offer after a jury had been selected. Prosecutors Larry Doan and Michelle Martin and Thompson's attorney, Lawrence Greenberg, exchanged plea offers for more than an hour Tuesday, weighing the DNA evidence against faulty witness identification.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Staff Writer | April 20, 1993
At least 45 minutes after he pulled himself out of a hole he had dug, Gregg Olson walked briskly into the Orioles' clubhouse and said he had found the answer on videotape.Faulty mechanics.That's what has been bothering the Orioles' all-time saves leader. That's the root of the problem that has set Baltimore talk shows buzzing and baseball fans booing.Faulty mechanics. He hopes."It's mechanics, I think, I hope," Olson said after a lengthy session in the Orioles' video room, where he re- viewed his latest escape.
NEWS
February 23, 2014
At last week's Board of Public Works meeting, Comptroller Peter Franchot asked a series of pointed questions about the process by which the state selected the vendors who built Maryland's flawed health insurance exchange website. In particular, he suggested that the state was ill served by legislation that exempted the health exchange's procurement from review by the Board of Public Works. "There's a damn good reason this board has stood the test of time since the Constitutional Convention of 1864," he said.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | September 13, 2013
A federal investigator has found that Maryland's Medicaid program had a 95 percent error rate in seeking reimbursement for room and board for the developmentally disabled and thus owes the U.S. government nearly $21 million. Advocates expressed concern that the findings could lead to budget cuts to the program and longer stays on waiting lists for vulnerable individuals and struggling families. In a report released Friday, the inspector general for the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services said that over a three-year period, state health officials routinely billed the federal government for room-and-board costs that were ineligible under Medicaid rules.
NEWS
July 13, 2013
It is good news that the Maryland Court of Appeals used common sense regarding the unfair trials that occurred as a result of the faulty instructions given jurors prior to 1980 ("13 Killers go free after court decision," July 11, 2013). In most European countries the corrections system recognizes that a person incarcerated for a crime is not the same person 20 years later. In the cases described in the newspaper, all the defendants had served 32 to 45 years in prison. Is further retribution really necessary?
NEWS
By Kathy Epstein and Maris St. Cyr | June 25, 2013
The 2002 Baltimore Region Rail System Plan envisioned a fully-connected transit system. But budgetary constraints and poor planning have whittled it down to the Red Line - a proposed east-west light rail line whose projected cost has exploded to $2.6 billion and keeps rising. That's a staggering sum that Maryland taxpayers cannot afford, especially with shrinking federal funds and because the cost of any overruns will be paid entirely by the taxpayers of Maryland. Fortunately, only a small percentage of this cost has been incurred.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Health officials continue to investigate how contaminated hot water sickened nearly two dozen people at the Johns Hopkins at Keswick complex Monday, but the case is similar to previous ones involving faulty water-heating systems that let chemicals mix into drinking water. Twenty-three people at the Hopkins facility - home to about 600 health system and university administrative workers - fell ill with headaches, breathing difficulty and dizziness. The investigation confirmed that chemicals known as nitrates and nitrites in the water supply were responsible for the illnesses, but officials still are exploring their origin.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector and Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2013
The Baltimore Health Department said late Wednesday that investigators believe a faulty hot water heater sickened 23 people at the Johns Hopkins at Keswick complex this week. An estimated 600 people were evacuated from the complex Tuesday afternoon after people reported difficulty breathing. Standard checks by emergency officials ruled out exposure to carbon monoxide, explosives, hydrogen sulfide and low oxygen. Investigators said they also were examining the possibility of food contamination.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Staff Writer | October 3, 1993
At least 30 soldiers on their way to Aberdeen Proving Ground were injured yesterday evening in a chain-reaction accident near Bel Air involving three military buses.Many of the injured were taken in 22 ambulances to Fallston General Hospital in Fallston, Harford Memorial Hospital in Havre de Grace and Franklin Square Hospital in Essex. Most of the injuries proved not serious, police said later.But one woman, Christina J. Colstad, 19, of Princeton, Ill., stationed at Aberdeen Proving Ground, was flown to the Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where she was listed in good condition last night.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | May 22, 2006
WASHINGTON -- For a second straight day, a win seemed to hang before the Orioles, waiting to be snatched. And for a second day, they couldn't reach out. O's@Mariners Tonight, 10:05, no TV, 1090 AM Starters: O's Erik Bedard (5-2, 4.18) vs. Mariners' Jamie Moyer (1-4, 3.72)
NEWS
By Paul Lang | February 14, 2013
On Feb. 5, the Baltimore County Board of Education approved a proposal to build a 700-seat elementary school on the current site of Mays Chapel Park in Timonium. This decision is the culmination of a long process in which the board, county executive and County Council went through the motions of a fair deliberative process, with input from the residents of the surrounding community. In fact, this was a charade designed to reach a preordained conclusion. The issue of the proposed school was placed on the agenda of the regularly scheduled Board of Education meeting.
NEWS
January 21, 2013
In the capitalist-communist People's Republic of China, people encounter problems returning products that stink. In our capitalist-democracy of the United States of America, a refund on stinky products is an honored business practice. An overt sense of fairness is the glue of invisible integrity that hinges an economy based on spending. If you buy it and it stinks, you return it and get your money back. No questions asked. In the U.S. economy, one cannot sell snake oil and call it orange juice.
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