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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
SARASOTA, Fla. -- If Brian Roberts has an extra bounce in his step, it's for good reason. He's back feeling good and ready to compete for the starting second base job, but there's something going on in his life that's even more important than playing baseball. Brian and his wife Diana are expecting their first child. “It's awesome," Roberts said. “It's been a huge blessing. Most people know of my passion and affinity for kids. Being able to add that to our life…to be able to have that is really great timing for us after all that has gone on. I think it has provided us with an extra boost.” It's been a long three years for Roberts, who has suffered a variety of injuries that have severely limited his playing time.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Emma Schkloven, The Baltimore Sun | October 31, 2013
On his latest album, July's “Last of the Great Pretenders,” singer Matt Nathanson opens with the lyric, “I'd kill anyone who'd treat you as bad as I do.” With it, the 40-year-old artist announces his eighth full-length record is clearly different than the others. With songs that take place chronologically from mid-summer to New Year's Eve, “Pretenders” feels like a page from Nathanson's personal journal. Through complex lyrics, the album engages emotionally and brings to light Nathanson's grittier, deeper side.
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SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | July 21, 2012
For those of you who are worried that Joe Flacco might be overwhelmed and overtired after the birth of his first child, the Ravens quarterback wants you to know that he's sleeping just fine these days. "My wife does a great job. I can't complain. Everything's pretty good," Flacco said Saturday night while appearing at a benefit for the Special Olympics of Maryland at Al Packer Ford in White Marsh.  Flacco's wife, Dana, gave birth to their son, Stephen, on June 13. The child was named after Flacco's father.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | June 14, 2013
Malik Carter, 17, shared a slice of pizza with his 20-month-old son Makai, who was perched on his dad's lap during the pre-Father's Day celebration this week at the Bon Secours Community Support Center in Southwest Baltimore. As part of the festivities, called "A Day with Dad," Carter and a handful of other young fathers and their children got free haircuts, ate cake and mingled with community members. One dad quizzed another about whether his baby was on "stage 2" foods yet, while two boys pulled out coloring books from their dad's gift bag. "We're trying to appreciate these young men, to show them that they are valuable" to the community and to their children, said Anees Abdul-Rahim, manager of the Bon Secours fatherhood program, which targets low-income city fathers ages 16 through 26. The parenting program is one of dozens of similar efforts in the state and around the country that try to teach men - frequently young, urban, unmarried and jobless - how to be better fathers, which for some simply means showing up to see their children.
SPORTS
March 15, 2012
 
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 18, 2012
Joe Flacco became a father last week, forcing the Ravens quarterback to miss the final two days of the team's mandatory minicamp. He and wife, Dana, are the proud parents of Stephen Flacco, who weighs eight pounds. A decent amount of both ink and bandwidth was used up around Baltimore on the birth of Flacco's first son, but Flacco won't be the only high-profile NFL quarterback who will be experiencing the joys of fatherhood for the first time during the 2012 season. Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo became a father in April and Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and his wife are expecting their first child later this year . But apparently there is at least one random Ravens fan who believes that Flacco's game will be thrown off this season by the quarterback's newborn baby boy. At least that was the premise of Kevin Cowherd's column in Monday's newspaper . What's that you say?
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and By Peter Jensen,STAFF WRITER | October 15, 2000
If football is analogous to war - players hit, kick, throw bombs - what does the gentler game of baseball represent? Jack Petrash has discovered the answer. When he sat down to write a book about fatherhood, the comparison to the national pastime was irresistible. "It was the best way to explain what I wanted to say on the subject," says Petrash, a twice-married father of three who lives in Kensington, a suburb northwest of Washington. Petrash, 51, a teacher for 25 years at the Washington Waldorf School, a private school in Bethesda, took a year off to write "Covering Home" (Robins Lane Press, $19.95)
NEWS
By Greg Morago and Greg Morago,Special to the Sun | July 6, 2003
It was inevitable that Paul McCartney would become the butt of jokes when he announced not long ago that, at 60, he and his significantly younger wife were expecting. It's the stuff Letterman and Leno live for. Writing in his acerbic "Hot Sheet" column in Entertainment Weekly, Jim Mullen noted: "By the time the kid gets out of diapers, Sir Paul will be wearing them." Mullen only proves a point: Geezer dads in Depends will always be loaded with humor. Who's not laughing? Most likely the aged dads themselves and their families.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kevin Cowherd and Kevin Cowherd,SUN COLUMNIST | June 19, 2005
For those who believe it's possible to read your way into being a better dad, there are plenty of books out there that might help this Father's Day. As a rule, these tend to fall into two distinct categories: the this-is-serious-business dad books and the lighter-side-of-being-a-dad books. A prime example of the former is The Father's Book: Being a Good Dad in the 21st Century, by David Cohen. Although it purports to cover everything from a child's needs to discipline techniques to playing with your kid, it begins with this rather ominous observation: "Fathers love their sons and want to protect them, but fathers are also jealous; they see their sons who are strong, beautiful and have their lives before them.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | July 22, 1997
BOSTON -- Taxicabs roam the streets of New York City these days bearing a question: "Who's the Father?"These are not mobile gossipmongers. These are ads that promise anyone within reading distance an answer. Just call "1-800-DNA-TYPE."This is how it works: A cotton swab in the mouth of man and child, a genetic test, and the matter of paternity is finally put to rest -- yes or no.I don't know if Bill Cosby passed such a cab as he headed to the Manhattan courtroom where a woman who desperately claims to be his daughter was on trial.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck and The Baltimore Sun | February 15, 2013
If Brian Roberts has an extra bounce in his step, it's for good reason. He's back feeling good and ready to compete for the starting second base job, but there's something going on his life that is even more important than playing baseball. Brian and his wife Diana are expecting their first child. “It's awesome," Roberts said. “It's been a huge blessing. Most people know of my passion and affinity for kids. Being able to add that to our life…to be able to have that is really great timing for us after all that has gone on. I think it has provided us with an extra boost.” It's been a long three years for Roberts, who has suffered a variety of injuries that have severely limited his playing time.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec | July 21, 2012
For those of you who are worried that Joe Flacco might be overwhelmed and overtired after the birth of his first child, the Ravens quarterback wants you to know that he's sleeping just fine these days. "My wife does a great job. I can't complain. Everything's pretty good," Flacco said Saturday night while appearing at a benefit for the Special Olympics of Maryland at Al Packer Ford in White Marsh.  Flacco's wife, Dana, gave birth to their son, Stephen, on June 13. The child was named after Flacco's father.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | June 18, 2012
Joe Flacco became a father last week, forcing the Ravens quarterback to miss the final two days of the team's mandatory minicamp. He and wife, Dana, are the proud parents of Stephen Flacco, who weighs eight pounds. A decent amount of both ink and bandwidth was used up around Baltimore on the birth of Flacco's first son, but Flacco won't be the only high-profile NFL quarterback who will be experiencing the joys of fatherhood for the first time during the 2012 season. Dallas Cowboys quarterback Tony Romo became a father in April and Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback Ben Roethlisberger and his wife are expecting their first child later this year . But apparently there is at least one random Ravens fan who believes that Flacco's game will be thrown off this season by the quarterback's newborn baby boy. At least that was the premise of Kevin Cowherd's column in Monday's newspaper . What's that you say?
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | June 17, 2012
As we all know, there's a certain segment of Ravens Nation that thrives on gloom and paranoia. To these fans, everything that happens to the Ravens is a crisis. No injury is too minor that it can't spell catastrophe. No move by another team is too insignificant that it can't derail the Ravens' Super Bowl chances. Nothing that happens at 1 Winning Drive is too trivial that it can't be brooded and obsessed over for weeks. Unfortunately, these lunatic fans have access to cell phones and email and social media outlets to spread their gospel of doom.
SPORTS
By Arda Ocal | June 4, 2012
WWE's No Way Out pay-per-view this year falls on June 17, the same day as Father's Day. This year will be a very special celebration for WWE's newest dad, Ted DiBiase. His son, Tate, was born May 15 . DiBiase couldn't be happier to be a dad. Nothing could have prepared him for the moment he met his baby boy. “Everyone was telling [me], 'Hey your life is gonna change, it's gonna be the most amazing moment in your life.' I was like, 'Yeah, I'm sure it will be,'" DiBiase said.
SPORTS
March 15, 2012
 
NEWS
By John Leo | May 9, 1995
DAVID BLANKENHORN has a question: Why isn't there some debate about the fact that American sperm banks sell sperm to single women?As usual, the elite culture in America will hear this question in one way; the rest of the country will hear it differently.Elite response: Here comes another at tack on privacy and individual rights.Rest of the country: Why is it so obvious that a wide-open commercial market in the production of fatherless children is a social good?Mr. Blankenhorn is head of the Institute for American Values in Manhattan.
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
It has been an interesting two months for catcher Craig Tatum . He lost his big league job, became a first-time father and thought his career might be in jeopardy when he heard his shoulder pop on a throw this month. And now the 28-year-old is back in the majors, officially recalled Thursday after the Orioles demoted Brandon Snyder to Triple-A Norfolk. "It's been up and down. Of course, I wanted to be up here, but I had some stuff to work on," said Tatum, who hit .200 in 21 games at Norfolk.
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