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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2012
Sitting on a bench toward the rear of a Harford County courtroom Tuesday was a row of well-dressed women determined to send Robert C. Richardson III a message: They've got his back. The four Bel Air women say they're part of a network of support building for the teen, who police say confessed to the Jan. 9 killing of his father. Tuesday, the 16-year-old, represented by a public defender, waived his right to a preliminary hearing and was immediately swept back into custody. The women say they want to pay for a private lawyer to represent Richardson on the first- and second-degree murder charges he faces.
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SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | June 15, 2006
Mamaroneck, N.Y. -- Tiger Woods always seemed destined for something great, something much bigger than a person or a game or a 500-yard hole that doglegs right. His father memorably told Sports Illustrated that Woods would "do more than any other man in history to change the course of humanity." A bit more grandiose than just blasting out of the sand to save par, don't you think? But what was that something? How would Woods transcend sports? By attracting more young people to the game?
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | May 1, 2001
BOSTON -- If he were in jail for mass murder, he would have been sprung by now. After all, the DNA evidence proved that he was the wrong man. So how come a man who has been proven scientifically not to be the biological father must go on paying child support? How come the same DNA test that can force one man into paternal obligation can't automatically free another? Last week, a Massachusetts man joined a fraternity that now has members as far flung as Florida and Texas, Georgia and Ohio.
NEWS
By Beverly Fine | March 22, 1995
THE POWER of love to overcome the lust for money -- something so rare today -- was demonstrated several months ago at a most unlikely place: a cemetery.It is the custom among most Jews to conduct a memorial service (Kaddish) at the graveside of a loved one, usually a spouse or a parent, within a year after his or her death. At that time, a monument or marker, is dedicated; and this ceremony, conducted by a rabbi, is called an "unveiling."The sky on the afternoon of Nov. 1, 1994, the date of my Uncle Aaron's unveiling, was as gray as the granite tombstones in the graveyard.
NEWS
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | January 30, 2014
Dr. Roy H. Brown, the father of Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, died in hospice care in Huntington, N.Y. Thursday. He was 89. Dr. Brown, who battled cancer over the past four months, was surrounded by his wife, Lilly, his children and his family. Lt. Gov. Brown issued a statement Thursday evening, saying: "My father was a man who led by example. He rose out of poverty in Kingston, Jamaica and overcame incredible odds to become a doctor. As a loving husband and father, he worked tirelessly to provide every opportunity for his children.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | March 31, 2007
ATLANTA -- Georgetown, its coach, John Thompson III, told reporters yesterday, is "the son-of team." He quickly added, "And look, Florida might be the son-of team also." Ohio State might also fit that description, except only one of its players is a "son of." Poor UCLA, then. The Bruins are the only participants in the Final Four without a player whose father's name is instantly recognizable - as an athlete, and most likely as a basketball player. How'd they crash the family picnic? The better question is: How did the other three teams manage this, to get so much from the sons of highly accomplished fathers?
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | June 17, 1994
Washington -- Fatherhood is full of surprises, big and small. There is the special thrill that comes on one's way to the bathroom in the dark of the night after one's bare foot has stepped on a tiny little ''power sword'' held aloft by a tiny little plastic Power Ranger action figure.There is the singular amazement one experiences after discovering how many chocolate-flavored Cocoa Puffs tiny hands have stuffed into the floppy disk drive of one's home computer.But nothing surprises a dad more than the strange out-of-body experience that comes when you hear yourself saying to your son something from your own lips that you swore you would never say, as your own father said the very same thing years ago.Now that the future Nobel Prize-winner Grady Jonathan Page has turned 5 (my, how time flies)
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,Sun Staff Writer | August 31, 1994
Invoking the slaying last week of her father, Republican U.S. Senate candidate Ruthann Aron called for tougher sentences for criminals and took shots at one of her chief rivals for the nomination during a televised forum last night.The one-hour session aired live on WBFF-TV (Channel 45) was the first head-to-head meeting of the leading four contenders for the job now held by three-term Democratic Sen. Paul S. Sarbanes, who faces token opposition in the Sept. 13 primary.The participants included the political target of Ms. Aron's jabs, former Tennessee Sen. Bill Brock, as well as first-term state Del. C. Ronald Franks and perennial candidate Ross Z. Pierpont.
NEWS
By Lori Watkins and Lori Watkins,[Special to the Sun] | December 3, 2006
I know everyone has a story about the first person they loved. My story is different. My first love was my father -- boxer Rudolph Valentino Watkins Sr. My father is the first man who instilled in me what a man or what a gentleman is all about. My dad would always have these different sayings, such as, "A man has nothing but his word. If a man does not keep his word then he is not a true man." I did not understand what he meant as a child, but as I matured I grew to know what he meant.
ENTERTAINMENT
By MICHAEL OLLOVE and MICHAEL OLLOVE,SUN STAFF | May 12, 2002
Joseph Stein Jr.'s apprenticeship began on a dark street corner in 1968 when he slammed an ax into an alarm box. The box hung like a wasp's nest from an exterior wall of a drugstore in southwest Baltimore. When Joe hit it, the box started wailing loudly and fell to the pavement, where Joe's father calmly collected it and dropped it into a bucket of water brought just for this purpose. The clangor stopped. Joe was now ready to commence his first burglary. He was 13. All these years later, Joe Stein still lacks the vocabulary to adequately characterize his upbringing.
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