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Father Joe

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NEWS
April 21, 1993
At the beginning of this school term -- his 28th year as president of Loyola College -- the Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger addressed the Loyola community, reminding students, faculty and staff alike that the mission and identity of the college is something that must be constantly renewed and carefully tended. Driven toward excellence, dynamic and innovative, concerned about the moral and personal development of students, Loyola, he told them, should always strive to embody the best of a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal arts education.
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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | January 10, 2010
Actress Bridgetta Tomarchio figures she gets her stage presence from her dad, Mr. Tire. But she's taken it far afield of "on the rim and out the door." Tomarchio, daughter of the tire store executive known around Baltimore for doing his own ads, has for the past four years been the ExtenZe Girl, host of an hourlong infomercial for a "male enhancement" product. She has appeared in the Lingerie Bowl, which had scantily clad models playing full-contact football. She played one of David Duchovny's hotties on Showtime's "Californication."
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FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 1994
On the second Sunday of Advent, the Church of the Annunciation in Rosedale is filled with more than 300 parishioners for the 10:30 a.m. folk mass. Most are here for one reason: to hear the corny humor and self-effacing wisdom of the Rev. Joseph F. Breighner.Father Breighner, an itinerant priest whose radio show and weekly newspaper column have made him a local phenomenon, doesn't disappoint the crowd.Standing before the pulpit, he cracks a couple of jokes about holiday weight gain to warm up his audience.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 25, 2008
That terrific TV critic Joyce Millman rightly called the first chaotic X-Files movie, The X-Files: Fight the Future, "an overgrown sweeps episode." Ten years later (and six years after the series' demise), The X -Files: I Want to Believe resembles those TV-series reunions that bring the cast of a hit together for a not-so-special occasion. The plot about a clairvoyant defrocked priest, Father Joe (Billy Connolly), who may lead the FBI to a kidnapped agent, sutures together tropes from serial-killer movies, horror classics such as The Body Snatcher and Frankenstein, medical suspense films like Coma and psychic jamborees like The Dead Zone.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | November 13, 1992
Loyola began conquering the bad news about Father Joe Sellinger on a hot, clear September afternoon.Every year, the priest looked forward to this day, to the Mass of the Holy Spirit that was the spiritual beginning of the school year. And every year, he would be disappointed, demanding after the service, "Where were the students?"But this year, as if a message had been secretly passed from person to person, a crowd -- big beyond belief -- gathered in the college's neo-Gothic chapel. The students were everywhere, in the aisles, out the door, even on the floor behind the altar.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 16, 1993
The priest remembers seeing him in church because, for one thing, men in their 30s aren't the most devoted church-goers, and parish priests appreciate the ones who show up. Jimmy Kulbicki regularly attended Mass with his wife and two boys at St. Elizabeth's Roman Catholic Church in East Baltimore. Father Joe Hart remembers that much.And he remembers Kulbicki as rugged, quiet and intense. "He was a still-waters-run-deep kind of guy," says Father Joe, now assigned to a Towson parish. Kulbicki never betrayed a serious personal problem, and the priest likes to think he has a good eye for people in trouble.
NEWS
April 20, 1993
In mid-1971, a group of three men, each equipped with a walkie-talkie, appeared at the auction of the old Emerson Hotel in downtown Baltimore. Without announcing their affiliation, they quietly purchased (for a song) many of the hotel's beds, bureaus and chairs. The next day a truck hauled them to Loyola College, where they were used to equip dormitories.The Emerson Hotel caper was one of many engineered by the Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger, Loyola's president since 1964. "You have to be something of an operator to be successful in this business," President Sellinger said later.
NEWS
May 5, 1993
Value TeachingDavid W. Cammack's desire (letter, April 17) to impart basic moral values in students can be done outside the framework of religion.Howard County public schools have developed a list of "core values" for such a purpose. Values such as truthfulness, compassion and tolerance are among the common moral decencies of any civilized society. They transcend any particular religion.The danger of instituting religious instruction in public schools is evident in Mr. Cammack's use of the term "responsible" religions, which implies that he does not view all religious beliefs as equally valid.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 25, 2008
That terrific TV critic Joyce Millman rightly called the first chaotic X-Files movie, The X-Files: Fight the Future, "an overgrown sweeps episode." Ten years later (and six years after the series' demise), The X -Files: I Want to Believe resembles those TV-series reunions that bring the cast of a hit together for a not-so-special occasion. The plot about a clairvoyant defrocked priest, Father Joe (Billy Connolly), who may lead the FBI to a kidnapped agent, sutures together tropes from serial-killer movies, horror classics such as The Body Snatcher and Frankenstein, medical suspense films like Coma and psychic jamborees like The Dead Zone.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | July 29, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- In the final days of his illness, Monsignor Joseph C. Antoszewski sent one last message to the people of St. John Catholic Church."He wanted me to tell our people he is still praying for them," the Rev. Isaac Karoor, an associate pastor at the church for the past two years, said at weekend Masses.With that message, the 65-year-old priest, whom everyone called "Monsignor Joe," hoped to console the parishioners he had served for the past 21 years."He has gone ahead of us to prepare our eternal home, just as he has done here," said Father Karoor at the Masses following the monsignor's death from cancer Saturday.
FEATURES
By Stephanie Shapiro and Stephanie Shapiro,Sun Staff Writer | December 21, 1994
On the second Sunday of Advent, the Church of the Annunciation in Rosedale is filled with more than 300 parishioners for the 10:30 a.m. folk mass. Most are here for one reason: to hear the corny humor and self-effacing wisdom of the Rev. Joseph F. Breighner.Father Breighner, an itinerant priest whose radio show and weekly newspaper column have made him a local phenomenon, doesn't disappoint the crowd.Standing before the pulpit, he cracks a couple of jokes about holiday weight gain to warm up his audience.
NEWS
May 5, 1993
Value TeachingDavid W. Cammack's desire (letter, April 17) to impart basic moral values in students can be done outside the framework of religion.Howard County public schools have developed a list of "core values" for such a purpose. Values such as truthfulness, compassion and tolerance are among the common moral decencies of any civilized society. They transcend any particular religion.The danger of instituting religious instruction in public schools is evident in Mr. Cammack's use of the term "responsible" religions, which implies that he does not view all religious beliefs as equally valid.
NEWS
April 21, 1993
At the beginning of this school term -- his 28th year as president of Loyola College -- the Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger addressed the Loyola community, reminding students, faculty and staff alike that the mission and identity of the college is something that must be constantly renewed and carefully tended. Driven toward excellence, dynamic and innovative, concerned about the moral and personal development of students, Loyola, he told them, should always strive to embody the best of a Catholic, Jesuit, liberal arts education.
NEWS
April 20, 1993
In mid-1971, a group of three men, each equipped with a walkie-talkie, appeared at the auction of the old Emerson Hotel in downtown Baltimore. Without announcing their affiliation, they quietly purchased (for a song) many of the hotel's beds, bureaus and chairs. The next day a truck hauled them to Loyola College, where they were used to equip dormitories.The Emerson Hotel caper was one of many engineered by the Rev. Joseph A. Sellinger, Loyola's president since 1964. "You have to be something of an operator to be successful in this business," President Sellinger said later.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | January 16, 1993
The priest remembers seeing him in church because, for one thing, men in their 30s aren't the most devoted church-goers, and parish priests appreciate the ones who show up. Jimmy Kulbicki regularly attended Mass with his wife and two boys at St. Elizabeth's Roman Catholic Church in East Baltimore. Father Joe Hart remembers that much.And he remembers Kulbicki as rugged, quiet and intense. "He was a still-waters-run-deep kind of guy," says Father Joe, now assigned to a Towson parish. Kulbicki never betrayed a serious personal problem, and the priest likes to think he has a good eye for people in trouble.
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,Staff Writer | November 13, 1992
Loyola began conquering the bad news about Father Joe Sellinger on a hot, clear September afternoon.Every year, the priest looked forward to this day, to the Mass of the Holy Spirit that was the spiritual beginning of the school year. And every year, he would be disappointed, demanding after the service, "Where were the students?"But this year, as if a message had been secretly passed from person to person, a crowd -- big beyond belief -- gathered in the college's neo-Gothic chapel. The students were everywhere, in the aisles, out the door, even on the floor behind the altar.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,laura.vozzella@baltsun.com | January 10, 2010
Actress Bridgetta Tomarchio figures she gets her stage presence from her dad, Mr. Tire. But she's taken it far afield of "on the rim and out the door." Tomarchio, daughter of the tire store executive known around Baltimore for doing his own ads, has for the past four years been the ExtenZe Girl, host of an hourlong infomercial for a "male enhancement" product. She has appeared in the Lingerie Bowl, which had scantily clad models playing full-contact football. She played one of David Duchovny's hotties on Showtime's "Californication."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2005
SANTA MARIA, Calif. - Michael Jackson, dressed in purple paisley pajama bottoms and looking more spectral than ever, listened yesterday in obvious distress to more than four hours of damaging testimony from the boy who has accused Jackson of sexually molesting him. In a dramatic start to a tense day, Jackson arrived in court more than an hour late, disheveled, limping and heavily medicated after what his lawyers said was a fall early yesterday morning that...
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | July 29, 1992
WESTMINSTER -- In the final days of his illness, Monsignor Joseph C. Antoszewski sent one last message to the people of St. John Catholic Church."He wanted me to tell our people he is still praying for them," the Rev. Isaac Karoor, an associate pastor at the church for the past two years, said at weekend Masses.With that message, the 65-year-old priest, whom everyone called "Monsignor Joe," hoped to console the parishioners he had served for the past 21 years."He has gone ahead of us to prepare our eternal home, just as he has done here," said Father Karoor at the Masses following the monsignor's death from cancer Saturday.
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