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Father Figure

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By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,Sun Reporter | September 2, 2007
Ben Eaton Jr. gripped both sides of the lectern as if he had an opposing quarterback in his grasp. "He taught me to be a real man, husband and great father," he said. Eaton Jr., the former Gilman linebacker and The Sun's 2006 Defensive Player of the Year now playing at Mercersburg (Pa.) Academy, was among those who spoke at Ben Eaton Sr.'s funeral yesterday at the Carl H. Murphy Fine Arts Center at Morgan State. "I had him for 18 years, and I will take care of my mom, " said Eaton Jr., looking at his mother, Sandra.
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NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
A group of young men at Howard Community College are giving new meaning to the Orwellian phrase, "Big Brother is watching you. " They are members of the community college's leadership program Howard PRIDE (Purpose, Respect, Initiative, Determination, Excellence), and their designated Big Brother is Steven Freeman, the program's assistant director. To say they relish his watchful eye is an understatement. What began as a pilot program three years ago offering math support to boost graduation rates among African-American males has become a resource and mentoring tool for any Howard Community College male of color.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
August Wilson's "Jitney," set in 1977, focuses on a poor urban neighborhood where "urban renewal" just means demolition and neglect. The plot revolves around a company of unlicensed cabs trying to maintain service for an African-American community ignored by regular taxis. "It is more relevant now than in some years since the play was written," said Roscoe Orman, the veteran actor who stars in a new staging of "Jitney" by Theatre Morgan at Morgan State University this weekend. The tall, handsome Orman, familiar to successive generations of children as Gordon on "Sesame Street" since 1974, plays Becker, owner of the gypsy cab company.
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Former Loyola University soccer great Stan Koziol, who also played briefly for the Blast in an eight-year professional career, passed away Monday morning after battling leukemia. He was 48. Koziol, a New Jersey native, enjoyed a stellar four-year career at Loyola, where he was a two-time All-American (1986-87) and remains the program's all-time leader in assists. He was inducted into the school's Hall of Fame in 1994. Koziol began his professional career playing outdoors for the American Soccer League's Maryland Bays in 1988 and, after a season with the Boston Bolts in the ASL, returned to Baltimore to play for the Blast in the 1989-90 season.
NEWS
By Tim Craig and Tim Craig,SUN STAFF | February 21, 2001
About three dozen people rallied last night in a show of support for Orlando Howard Yarborough, the owner of an Essex martial arts school charged with abusing a 15-year-old student. Members of the group, including martial arts instructors who work for Yarborough, current and former students and parents, said they do not believe the charges and described him as a model citizen who has helped thousands of disadvantaged youngsters. "He's a father figure to all of us," said James Ward, 29, of Owings Mills, a one-time student.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,sun reporter | July 27, 2007
A convicted pastor's tearful plea for leniency, impassioned testimony about his character and a courtroom jammed with supporters failed to sway a Howard County Circuit Court judge, who sentenced the religious leader yesterday to 15 years in prison for sexually abusing a teenage boy who said he once viewed the man as a father figure. As Gerald Fitroy Griffith, 41, was led away in handcuffs, some supporters from Redemption Christian Fellowship Church in Woodlawn who had been quietly crying and sniffling broke into wails and sobs, and one thrashing man was restrained by companions.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 23, 1998
PASADENA, Calif. -- Robert Young was television's seminal father figure.But that only starts to describe the lasting importance of his two beloved and long-running TV characters, Jim Anderson of "Father Knows Best" and Dr. Marcus Welby of "Marcus Welby, M.D." They are television archetypes of authority and masculinity that are still being imitated today in media and our lives.The actor, 91, died Tuesday night of natural causes at his Southern California home in Westlake Village."He just stopped breathing, basically," his physician, Dr. John Horton, told the Associated Press.
NEWS
June 29, 2004
On June 26, 2004 AUGUST J. STOCKMAN; beloved husband of Anna T. Stockman (nee Hohman); devoted father of Deborah Karabulut and her husband Nick and Buzzy Stockman and his wife Kathy; father figure of Courtland S. Taylor. Also survived by eight grandchildren, two great grandchildren and many family and friends. A Funeral Service will be held at the Connelly Funeral Home of Essex, 300 Mace Avenue, on Wednesday 11 A.M. Visiting hours Monday and Tuesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Interment Oak Lawn Cemetery.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
Vernon Arthur "Artie" Dicks was a father figure to many performers in Annapolis, regularly showing up at a musical set with a word of encouragement.Tomorrow, it will be the performers who show up for Artie Dicks, in a musical tribute to his life."
SPORTS
By Glenn Graham and The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
Former Loyola University soccer great Stan Koziol, who also played briefly for the Blast in an eight-year professional career, passed away Monday morning after battling leukemia. He was 48. Koziol, a New Jersey native, enjoyed a stellar four-year career at Loyola, where he was a two-time All-American (1986-87) and remains the program's all-time leader in assists. He was inducted into the school's Hall of Fame in 1994. Koziol began his professional career playing outdoors for the American Soccer League's Maryland Bays in 1988 and, after a season with the Boston Bolts in the ASL, returned to Baltimore to play for the Blast in the 1989-90 season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
August Wilson's "Jitney," set in 1977, focuses on a poor urban neighborhood where "urban renewal" just means demolition and neglect. The plot revolves around a company of unlicensed cabs trying to maintain service for an African-American community ignored by regular taxis. "It is more relevant now than in some years since the play was written," said Roscoe Orman, the veteran actor who stars in a new staging of "Jitney" by Theatre Morgan at Morgan State University this weekend. The tall, handsome Orman, familiar to successive generations of children as Gordon on "Sesame Street" since 1974, plays Becker, owner of the gypsy cab company.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Sun reporter | October 6, 2007
Growing up outside San Francisco, Ravens wide receiver Demetrius Williams heard stories from his father about what it was like to play college football and even try out for the pros. What resonated in the message sent from father to son was not in the successes, but in the failures. Dwight Williams started his college career at Texas Southern but had to transfer back home to San Francisco City College when his parents divorced. After playing semiprofessionally for four years, he tried out as a cornerback for the Los Angeles Rams, Oakland Raiders and San Francisco 49ers, but he never made it past training camp.
SPORTS
By Pat O'Malley and Pat O'Malley,Sun Reporter | September 2, 2007
Ben Eaton Jr. gripped both sides of the lectern as if he had an opposing quarterback in his grasp. "He taught me to be a real man, husband and great father," he said. Eaton Jr., the former Gilman linebacker and The Sun's 2006 Defensive Player of the Year now playing at Mercersburg (Pa.) Academy, was among those who spoke at Ben Eaton Sr.'s funeral yesterday at the Carl H. Murphy Fine Arts Center at Morgan State. "I had him for 18 years, and I will take care of my mom, " said Eaton Jr., looking at his mother, Sandra.
NEWS
By Rona Marech and Rona Marech,sun reporter | July 27, 2007
A convicted pastor's tearful plea for leniency, impassioned testimony about his character and a courtroom jammed with supporters failed to sway a Howard County Circuit Court judge, who sentenced the religious leader yesterday to 15 years in prison for sexually abusing a teenage boy who said he once viewed the man as a father figure. As Gerald Fitroy Griffith, 41, was led away in handcuffs, some supporters from Redemption Christian Fellowship Church in Woodlawn who had been quietly crying and sniffling broke into wails and sobs, and one thrashing man was restrained by companions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | July 17, 2005
The sole play in this summer's Contemporary American Theater Festival that doesn't deal with politics, terrorism or militarism is Sheri Wilner's Father Joy. It's also the most imaginative of the four offerings. The musical Chicago includes a song called Mister Cellophane about a man who's such a nonentity, people see right through him. In Father Joy, the father (Jonathan Bustle) of a budding sculptress named Abigail (a pitch-perfect Kaci Gober) is literally disappearing. He's fading more and more each day. Meanwhile, Abigail has begun a relationship with one of her former professors, an artist (Michael Goodwin)
NEWS
By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | June 20, 2005
Moments before a performance during the 11 a.m. service at St. Stephen's African Methodist Episcopal Church yesterday, Christian Johnson was acting like a father. "Fix your shirt," he whispered. Twelve-year-old Jordan Canada looked puzzled. "Tuck it in," Johnson whispered, louder this time, while pantomiming the motions. While he may not be Jordan's dad, Johnson plays the role of surrogate father, mentor and confidant to him and about 16 other young people who belong to a boys group called Jahari at St. Stephen's.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | July 17, 2005
The sole play in this summer's Contemporary American Theater Festival that doesn't deal with politics, terrorism or militarism is Sheri Wilner's Father Joy. It's also the most imaginative of the four offerings. The musical Chicago includes a song called Mister Cellophane about a man who's such a nonentity, people see right through him. In Father Joy, the father (Jonathan Bustle) of a budding sculptress named Abigail (a pitch-perfect Kaci Gober) is literally disappearing. He's fading more and more each day. Meanwhile, Abigail has begun a relationship with one of her former professors, an artist (Michael Goodwin)
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 14, 1997
BOSTON -- At first the newspaper ad barely registers. I am so immune to the endless presidential campaign that it passes across my line of vision like a subliminal political message. There is the full-page photo of Bill crossing the White House lawn with Hillary and Chelsea, saying that the ''toughest job in the world isn't being president. It's being a parent.''What is this, another Dick Morris Moment in the creation of the Papa Presidency? Yet another message for the soccer moms?Then a variation on this ad campaign appears on television.
NEWS
June 29, 2004
On June 26, 2004 AUGUST J. STOCKMAN; beloved husband of Anna T. Stockman (nee Hohman); devoted father of Deborah Karabulut and her husband Nick and Buzzy Stockman and his wife Kathy; father figure of Courtland S. Taylor. Also survived by eight grandchildren, two great grandchildren and many family and friends. A Funeral Service will be held at the Connelly Funeral Home of Essex, 300 Mace Avenue, on Wednesday 11 A.M. Visiting hours Monday and Tuesday 3 to 5 and 7 to 9 P.M. Interment Oak Lawn Cemetery.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 20, 2004
THIS IS FOR young guys who are newly married and facing their first Father's Day with an official father-in-law, middle-aged guys who've been married for a while, and old guys who've survived their parents and in-laws and even remember their names. Divorced guys can play along, too. Which of the following best describes you? 1. My father was (is) the greatest guy who ever lived, followed immediately by my father-in-law, the second-greatest guy who ever lived. 2. My relationship with my father was terrible, but when I married I married well and got the greatest father-in-law a fellow could imagine.
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