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Father Christmas

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NEWS
By John F. Kelly | October 4, 1993
LOITERING WITH INTENT: THE CHILD. By Peter O'Toole. Hyperion. 198 pages. $21.95.THIS is by no means your typical show-biz autobiography. The author, actor Peter O'Toole, doesn't blame his parents for all his problems, and the publisher doesn't emblazon the star's name and photograph on the book jacket and underneath, in small print, add "with So-and-so" (So-and-so actually having written the book).No, Mr. O'Toole, perhaps best known for his role as "Lawrence of Arabia" (but equally as deserving of praise for his part in "My Favorite Year")
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 16, 1999
The Ellicott City Business Association will hold its Miracle on Main Street celebration tomorrow, beginning at 6 p.m.However, the Father Christmas parade, scheduled at 7: 30 p.m., has been canceled. This year's parade -- which would have been the seventh -- was to have honored the firefighters who fought the fire Nov. 9 on Main Street. No reason was given for the cancellation.Instead of appearing in the parade, Father Christmas intends to walk along Main Street to greet visitors. Singers and actors from Baltimore School for the Arts will sing carols.
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NEWS
December 16, 1999
The Ellicott City Business Association will hold its Miracle on Main Street celebration tomorrow, beginning at 6 p.m.However, the Father Christmas parade, scheduled at 7: 30 p.m., has been canceled. This year's parade -- which would have been the seventh -- was to have honored the firefighters who fought the fire Nov. 9 on Main Street. No reason was given for the cancellation.Instead of appearing in the parade, Father Christmas intends to walk along Main Street to greet visitors. Singers and actors from Baltimore School for the Arts will sing carols.
FEATURES
By Jeff Guinn and Jeff Guinn,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | December 8, 1999
In the original version of "A Christmas Carol," Tiny Tim didn't exclaim, "God bless us every one" -- Little Fred said it. But the name of the most memorable character in this beloved Christmas story was changed from Little Fred to Tiny Tim by author Charles Dickens just before "A Christmas Carol" was published in 1843.That's just one of the little-known but intriguing facts about the holiday novella. While we continue to enjoy numerous movie and TV productions of "A Christmas Carol," equally fascinating is the story behind the story and why Dickens was moved to write the classic.
NEWS
By Hal Piper | December 25, 1998
Santa Claus' family tree has two branches. Sinter Klaas, Kris Kringle, Pere Noel, Buller Clos (Nicholas with Bells, in one region of Germany) and others recall the legend of St. Nicholas. He was a bishop in the late Roman Empire and lived in what is now Turkey. One night he anonymously tossed three bags of gold into the house of three poor girls who, lacking marriage dowries, might have been forced into prostitution. Nicholas' feast day is December 6, when German children put out their shoes to be filled with little presents.
NEWS
By Michael Pakenham | December 10, 1995
There are hundreds of books and bookish things gracing or infesting shops' shelves today. One of the more delightful is "Letters from Father Christmas," by J.R.R. Tolkien (Houghton Mifflin, $18.95), written by the great, late scholar-fantacist for his own children and published with enveloped reproductions of 10 of those letters. And another, starkly different but also clean of line and free of mawkishness, is "Ho, Ho, Ho," by Andy Warhol (Little, Brown & Co., $9.95), an arrangement of 37 Christmas-related drawings and aphorisms from the very early work of the man who became the most influential figure of Pop Art. Both will delight people from 7 to 100 and more, so long as they have imagination and an intact sense of irony.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | December 22, 1996
Santa Claus is a symbol of Christmas that is probably based on St. Nicholas, who was a bishop of Myra in Asia Minor during the fourth century.Through the centuries, the idea of the kind, gift-giving St. Nicholas changed to Father Christmas, then to the Dutch Sinter Claes and gradually into the St. Nick and Santa Claus that we know.Father Christmas was a stern man who punished as well as rewarded children. He was tall and thin and usually dressed in a fur robe, and he wore a wreath of Christmas greens.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | December 18, 1994
Collector recalls the spirit of Christmas pastAt this time of year, there aren't many homes in Baltimore that don't display a picture, statue or some other representation of Santa Claus. But none are more dominated by Father Christmas than the West Baltimore Victorian-style home of Bob Helsley.Mr. Helsley, 48, who teaches graphic design at the Maryland Institute, College of Art, collects Christmas memorabilia. For most of the year, the native Baltimorean's collection of items dating primarily from 1880 to 1920 is relegated to a third-floor display room.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Evening Sun Staff | December 6, 1990
WITH THE HOLIDAYS looming, the onset of the usual proliferation of yuletide television is noticeable. But beginning with tonight's "How the Grinch Stole Christmas" (at 8 on basic-service TNT), you may also notice that some Christmas season favorites have been snagged by cable channels.But first comes Hannukah, which begins at sundown Wednesday. A couple observances on the tube include a special episode of the cable series "Big Brother Jake," at 6 p.m. Saturday on The Family Channel, and two Maryland Public Television shows, "Hannukah: A Celebration of Freedom," which will be broadcast at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 13 on Channels 22 and 67, and "Dosvedanya Means Good-bye," which will be shown at 11 p.m. Dec. 17.In addition to "Grinch," Ted Turner's capture of Dr. Suess' nasty noel nemesis (it can be seen again on TNT Sunday and Dec. 12)
FEATURES
By Jeff Guinn and Jeff Guinn,FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | December 8, 1999
In the original version of "A Christmas Carol," Tiny Tim didn't exclaim, "God bless us every one" -- Little Fred said it. But the name of the most memorable character in this beloved Christmas story was changed from Little Fred to Tiny Tim by author Charles Dickens just before "A Christmas Carol" was published in 1843.That's just one of the little-known but intriguing facts about the holiday novella. While we continue to enjoy numerous movie and TV productions of "A Christmas Carol," equally fascinating is the story behind the story and why Dickens was moved to write the classic.
NEWS
By Hal Piper | December 25, 1998
Santa Claus' family tree has two branches. Sinter Klaas, Kris Kringle, Pere Noel, Buller Clos (Nicholas with Bells, in one region of Germany) and others recall the legend of St. Nicholas. He was a bishop in the late Roman Empire and lived in what is now Turkey. One night he anonymously tossed three bags of gold into the house of three poor girls who, lacking marriage dowries, might have been forced into prostitution. Nicholas' feast day is December 6, when German children put out their shoes to be filled with little presents.
FEATURES
By Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel and Ralph Kovel and Terry Kovel,KING FEATURES SYNDICATE | December 22, 1996
Santa Claus is a symbol of Christmas that is probably based on St. Nicholas, who was a bishop of Myra in Asia Minor during the fourth century.Through the centuries, the idea of the kind, gift-giving St. Nicholas changed to Father Christmas, then to the Dutch Sinter Claes and gradually into the St. Nick and Santa Claus that we know.Father Christmas was a stern man who punished as well as rewarded children. He was tall and thin and usually dressed in a fur robe, and he wore a wreath of Christmas greens.
NEWS
By Michael Pakenham | December 10, 1995
There are hundreds of books and bookish things gracing or infesting shops' shelves today. One of the more delightful is "Letters from Father Christmas," by J.R.R. Tolkien (Houghton Mifflin, $18.95), written by the great, late scholar-fantacist for his own children and published with enveloped reproductions of 10 of those letters. And another, starkly different but also clean of line and free of mawkishness, is "Ho, Ho, Ho," by Andy Warhol (Little, Brown & Co., $9.95), an arrangement of 37 Christmas-related drawings and aphorisms from the very early work of the man who became the most influential figure of Pop Art. Both will delight people from 7 to 100 and more, so long as they have imagination and an intact sense of irony.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach | December 18, 1994
Collector recalls the spirit of Christmas pastAt this time of year, there aren't many homes in Baltimore that don't display a picture, statue or some other representation of Santa Claus. But none are more dominated by Father Christmas than the West Baltimore Victorian-style home of Bob Helsley.Mr. Helsley, 48, who teaches graphic design at the Maryland Institute, College of Art, collects Christmas memorabilia. For most of the year, the native Baltimorean's collection of items dating primarily from 1880 to 1920 is relegated to a third-floor display room.
NEWS
By John F. Kelly | October 4, 1993
LOITERING WITH INTENT: THE CHILD. By Peter O'Toole. Hyperion. 198 pages. $21.95.THIS is by no means your typical show-biz autobiography. The author, actor Peter O'Toole, doesn't blame his parents for all his problems, and the publisher doesn't emblazon the star's name and photograph on the book jacket and underneath, in small print, add "with So-and-so" (So-and-so actually having written the book).No, Mr. O'Toole, perhaps best known for his role as "Lawrence of Arabia" (but equally as deserving of praise for his part in "My Favorite Year")
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Evening Sun Staff | December 6, 1990
WITH THE HOLIDAYS looming, the onset of the usual proliferation of yuletide television is noticeable. But beginning with tonight's "How the Grinch Stole Christmas" (at 8 on basic-service TNT), you may also notice that some Christmas season favorites have been snagged by cable channels.But first comes Hannukah, which begins at sundown Wednesday. A couple observances on the tube include a special episode of the cable series "Big Brother Jake," at 6 p.m. Saturday on The Family Channel, and two Maryland Public Television shows, "Hannukah: A Celebration of Freedom," which will be broadcast at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 13 on Channels 22 and 67, and "Dosvedanya Means Good-bye," which will be shown at 11 p.m. Dec. 17.In addition to "Grinch," Ted Turner's capture of Dr. Suess' nasty noel nemesis (it can be seen again on TNT Sunday and Dec. 12)
NEWS
By Christopher Corbett and Christopher Corbett,Christopher Corbett, a Baltimore writer, is the 1990 James Thurber Journalist-in-Residence at Ohio State University and the author of the novel "Vacationland." He wrote this commentary for the Los Angeles Times | October 7, 1990
"Babar," the famous children's book, has been the subject of a bitter two-year legal battle over licensing agreements. As one newspaper headline read last week: "Lawyers in Celesteville? Babar Is in Court."One morning Babar, the king of the elephants, opens his mail."Damn it, another subpoena," he shouts.Babar looks out the window of his palace. He sees the crowds lined up in front of the savings-and-loan office. He sees the police pushing angry depositors back in line. He looks up the street.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | December 13, 2001
Holiday Homes Tour From cozy bungalows to impressive mansions, the Loudoun Museum's 17th Annual Holiday Homes Tour in Leesburg, Va., this weekend features an eclectic mix of architecture. And each of the five historic homes on the tour will be decked in holiday splendor with decorations created by area floral designers. The guided tours will also offer a historic overview of each house and a look at home owners' private collections. A rare pre-renovations tour of Dodona Manor, the former home of General George C. Marshall, is also part of this year's event.
NEWS
By Christopher Corbett and Christopher Corbett,Christopher Corbett, a Baltimore writer, is the 1990 James Thurber Journalist-in-Residence at Ohio State University and the author of the novel "Vacationland." He wrote this commentary for the Los Angeles Times | October 7, 1990
"Babar," the famous children's book, has been the subject of a bitter two-year legal battle over licensing agreements. As one newspaper headline read last week: "Lawyers in Celesteville? Babar Is in Court."One morning Babar, the king of the elephants, opens his mail."Damn it, another subpoena," he shouts.Babar looks out the window of his palace. He sees the crowds lined up in front of the savings-and-loan office. He sees the police pushing angry depositors back in line. He looks up the street.
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