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NEWS
February 8, 2013
In his commentary, "Recognizing reality" (Feb. 5), Robert Pines suggests "The time is ripe for the United States to show tangible support for its closest ally in the Middle East … and to recognize the Golan for what it is: Israeli. " Based on years of tangible support for the state of Israel in the form of billions of dollars in military and non-military aid and vetoes of United Nations resolutions that condemn Israeli transgressions against Arabs and Arab lands and property, among many other displays of loyalty, it would appear that the time has always been ripe for this type of support.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2014
Music's communicative power - "such sweet compulsion," Milton called it - has been known to change lives. Hearing the right piece at the right time can make a person start to think and feel differently, maybe start down a new path. In a thoroughly unscientific sampling, members of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and other classical musicians who perform regularly in the area were asked to talk about the first works that caught their ears and hearts and have continued to inspire them.
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NEWS
By New York Daily News | February 13, 1992
THE TEMPTATION is strong to say that Mike Tyson deserves to suffer during every minute of the prison term that surely awaits him. After all, this is a man who boasted of hurting women, and who worked his way up to a rape conviction with a string of assaults and a pattern of lewd, vicious behavior. If character is fate, mercy has no role here.That temptation is enhanced by the belief that justice demands zero tolerance for rapists. Too many women suffer this peculiar brand of sexual violence, afraid even to report the crime out of fear of being victimized again by a court system that makes them prove their innocence.
NEWS
June 23, 2014
The death one week ago of baseball's Tony Gwynn, who is often remembered by Baltimoreans for his induction in the Hall of Fame in 2007 with Cal Ripken Jr. , called attention to the dangers of smokeless tobacco. The former San Diego Padres batting champ suffered from oral cancer and blamed two decades of chewing tobacco for his plight. As well-publicized as the health risks of tobacco may be in the U.S., the focus has been placed primarily on the dangers of cigarette smoking. That's understandable given the cigarettes are by far the most popular tobacco product.
NEWS
September 16, 1990
Editor: No doubt Saddam Hussein is beginning to feel the squeeze -- he is trying to weasel out of trouble of his own making to save his lordly position. This man reminds us of Hitler, Chamberlain and the Sudetenland (Czechoslovakia).Invading the tiny state of Kuwait was a cruel maneuver -- possibly as a jumping off point for grabbing Saudi Arabia. For the time being Mr. Hussein will have to put this idea on hold; he has enough to worry about -- perhaps contemplating Hitler's fate.Reuben Kramer.
NEWS
December 22, 1994
Former Secretary of State Dean Rusk, now dead at 85, never forgot democracy's fecklessness in the face of Hitler or the steel nerves needed to face down the Kremlin when the Cuban missile crisis threatened nuclear holocaust. As he entered his eighth decade and the Soviet superpower fell apart, he remarked: "I never thought I'd live to see this day." Left unspoken, of course, was what this event had to teach him about a lifelong obsession with the Communist menace.It was Dean Rusk's fate to head the State Department during the most turbulent years of this half-century.
FEATURES
By Jill Morrow | August 11, 1991
We were destined to meet in October of 1983. I know, because I stayed home from work yesterday and figured it out. It wasn't really difficult to do. First I compared our horoscopes. You are an earthbound Taurean, slow to take chances and highly predictable. I am an idealistic Aquarian and can perceive the patterns of life more quickly than you can. There are few intersections in life where this combination can meet with any satisfaction.Next I re-read my old journal entries. I know that you feethreatened by my journal.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN STAFF | December 8, 1999
The fate of a planned 300-acre regional park in Columbia might not be decided for at least 11 months under a ruling yesterday by a Howard County judge.Circuit Judge Raymond J. Kane Jr. postponed the trial of a lawsuit that has held up development of the land, which the county and the state bought in August 1998 with the goal of creating athletic fields. Unless Kane throws out the suit, the next trial date will be November 2000 at the earliest.His decision yesterday surprised both sides in the suit, brought by a friend of the late Elizabeth C. "Nancy" Smith, who owned the land straddling Route 175. The friend, Ohio physics teacher Byron C. Hall, brought the suit, seeking to prevent the former farm's sale and preserve the land.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 5, 1999
A Howard County Circuit Court jury was deliberating late last night the fate of an 18-year-old Baltimore man accused of attempted murder in one of two Harper's Choice shootings in September.After closing arguments by Assistant State's Attorney Christine B. Gage and defense attorney Richard Bernhardt, the jury retired to the deliberation room about 8: 45 p.m. to weigh the state's case against Robert Joseph Manning.Manning testified Wednesday that another man shot John Gordon Jackson, 38, formerly of Columbia, near the Fall River Terrace apartments Sept.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | June 16, 1997
Fate brings medical help to the rescueAs Susan Greenberg tells this story, I have to stop her to make sure I've heard the details correctly. Wait a minute, I say. Your 4-year-old son was running up a sidewalk in Owings Mills, and a tree fell on him?"
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 16, 2014
Every two-term president since the 22nd Amendment was ratified in 1951 has faced being a lame-duck upon his re-election. Barack Obama clearly is no exception. With approximately 28 months left in his presidency, the clock is running out as he seeks to achieve a favorable legacy. Unless Mr. Obama's party defies the odds and retains control of the Senate and recaptures the House in the November elections, the outlook seems dim to reverse the Republican obstructionism that has hobbled most of his White House tenure.
NEWS
By Patti Restivo | May 5, 2014
When community theater vaudeville landed on Main Street in the Laurel Mill Playhouse's spring production of Andrew Lippa's "The Wild Party" weekend before last, it roared. Based on Joseph Moncure March's 1928 narrative poem of the same name - banned in Boston due to risqué content - "The Wild Party" debuted off-Broadway at the Manhattan Theatre Club in 2000, earning the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Music and the 1999-2000 Obie Award for Best Choreography. Produced as part of the Edinburgh Festival Fringe in 2004, the operetta resurfaced to rave reviews at the Houston's Bayou City Theatrics just last year.
SPORTS
By Liam Durbin and For The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
[Editor's note: Liam  Durbin is owner/handicapper of e-ponies.com and creator of the One Click Pony, Pro Picks Mobile  and Exacta Max apps. He shares his Triple Crown picks and betting tips with The Baltimore Sun each year.] California Chrome hardly broke a sweat in his last four races, despite being in increasingly competitive fields. He appears to have push-button acceleration and is a man amongst boys on the west coast. One could argue that he has yet to show what he can do if really tested.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2014
Townhouse Kitchen + Bar, which opened in Harbor East the spring of 2012, was the first entry into the Baltimore market for the Chicago-area Restaurants-America group, a multi-concept restaurant operator. On Friday, the restaurant's website was down for maintenance and calls placed to its published phone number were redericted to an unspecified extension. Signs that have been taped to its doors since Wednesday say simply "Townhouse Kitchen + Bar is Closed Today. " Still, it is not clear if the Harbor East restaurant, which occupies a retail space in the Eden Building, is closed permanently.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 22, 2013
Among the greatest ironies of President John F. Kennedy's fateful visit to Texas in late November 1963 was that it was a political mission to resolve a rift among Texas Democrats looking toward his own re-election bid in 1964. The chief political beneficiary of Kennedy's assassination was the state's most prominent and powerful Democrat, Vice President Lyndon B. Johnson. LBJ did not favor the Kennedy trip and essentially was bypassed on the decision to make it. Until the fatal shots were fired as the Kennedy party was driven through downtown Dallas, the principal story line about the visit was whether a feud between liberal Texas Sen. Ralph Yarborough and Gov. John B. Connally, a close Johnson friend, could be smoothed over, to assure Kennedy's re-election in 1964.
NEWS
November 7, 2013
The Oct. 31 article, "Columbia, Glenwood farmers markets could close," failed to account for the 300-pound gorilla in the room - namely, price gouging by some greedy vendors hoping to cash in on the popularity of buying local. I patronize the orchard truck at the East Columbia Library location, where there is always a steady stream of customers. Why? Because they sell quality fruit at fair, reasonable prices. As part of their decision-making process on whether to close any markets, I suggest that members of the Howard County Farmers Market Board and Howard County Economic Development Authority personally visit the stalls of the underperforming vendors and observe their prices.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | November 21, 2007
To borrow a gambling analogy, news this week that voters would finally decide the fate of slots in Maryland felt an awful lot like pulling the arm of a machine and watching a series of cherries pop up. A winner! Jackpot! Payday! But don't let the flashing lights and ringing sirens fool you - there was no payoff pouring out of the machine, not for the horse racing industry anyway. At the track, even when we have a photo finish, it's still simple to sort out the winners and losers. At the State House, it's not so easy.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Molly Knight and Molly Knight,Sun Staff | November 17, 2002
Natasha Ruberry's friends told her she was silly to believe in fate. You'll never meet a man and just know he's "the one," they said. Her father told her believing in fate was foolhardy. Don't wait around for someone, he advised. You've got to get on with your life. So, Natasha threw in the towel. She purchased a house in White Marsh, moved in alone and let go of her hope that fate would someday bring that special person to her doorstep. "I couldn't wait around for the right person any longer," she said.
SPORTS
Peter Schmuck | October 26, 2013
COLLEGE PARK - There wasn't a cloud in the sky above Byrd Stadium on Saturday afternoon, except for the exceedingly dark one that has hung over Randy Edsall and the Maryland football program for the past few weeks. Things have been going so badly of late that the main consolation when the Terps headed to the locker room at halftime of Saturday's loss to Clemson was that they got through the first two quarters without having a player carted off the field on a trainer's truck. They lost seven regular players to injury at Wake Forest last week, so it was a minor miracle they were still in the game against the No. 9 Tigers well into the second half.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | July 26, 2013
Julie Stitt begged her husband for years to let her donate her kidney as he spent nearly a decade in dialysis, through two failed transplants. Last year, he relented. It was a difficult decision. Her husband, Chuck, didn't want her to make the sacrifice. And she knew her father, Richard Kern, would need a transplant eventually as nearly five decades of diabetes wore on his kidneys. That time came about a month after her decision. "It was a hard place," Julie Stitt said. "I wanted to give to my husband, but I knew my father would need one. " She volunteered to donate to a stranger, getting her husband on a donation exchange waiting list.
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