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By New York Times News Service | October 2, 1991
In the annals of crime, there are serial murderers, and then there are serial authors. Perhaps there was a moment when Joe McGinniss -- author of "Fatal Vision," the grisly story of an Army doctor who killed his pregnant wife and two daughters, and then "Blind Faith," another grisly story about a wife-killer -- felt like scrawling across his bathroom mirror, "Stop me before I write again." If there was, it passed.In his latest book, "Cruel Doubt," to be published this month by Simon & Schuster, Mr. McGinniss, who is 48, has once again immersed himself in the details of a small-town family murder.
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By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2004
Michael M. Gimbel had no problem navigating the widely spaced orange cones while driving the small utility cart. But once he put on the "fatal vision glasses," the cart's small but erratically moving wheels crunched the cones and knocked them around. "There was a big difference in perception," Gimbel said. "My ability was way off." The purpose of the demonstration at Sheppard Pratt Health System in Towson yesterday was to remind the public of the dangers of drinking and driving. The "fatal vision glasses" are designed to distort peripheral vision, reduce depth perception and blur vision to simulate the effects of having a blood-alcohol level of 0.10 percent, said Gimbel, director of Sheppard Pratt's Office of Substance Abuse Education.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | November 27, 1993
Even the broadcast networks, I guess, deserve a vacation every once in a while. That's the only explanation I can muster for tonight's programming in prime time, which is so far from prime it's not even funny -- and certainly isn't worth watching. Cable offers virtually the only offerings worth sampling, and even there it's slim pickings -- Thanksgiving weekend holiday leftovers.* "The American Music Awards 20th Anniversary" (8-10 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) -- Still scurrying for weekly replacements for "The Paula Poundstone Show," ABC tonight settles on this quickie special from Dick Clark Productions, which is a scary "innovation" for a TV awards show.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 23, 1994
The best things on TV tonight are on cable, which is becoming an increasingly common observation, especially on Wednesday nights. Network TV highlights include a groovy episode of "Beverly Hills, 90210," in which the cast members show up in flower-power regalia as part of a '60s "flashback" episode. Don't be bummed, though: a diary, not LSD, triggers the flashback.* " Beverly Hills, 90210" (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Jason Priestley, who plays Brandon, directs this episode, which has Brenda (Shannen Doherty)
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By Anica Butler and Anica Butler,SUN STAFF | December 31, 2004
Michael M. Gimbel had no problem navigating the widely spaced orange cones while driving the small utility cart. But once he put on the "fatal vision glasses," the cart's small but erratically moving wheels crunched the cones and knocked them around. "There was a big difference in perception," Gimbel said. "My ability was way off." The purpose of the demonstration at Sheppard Pratt Health System in Towson yesterday was to remind the public of the dangers of drinking and driving. The "fatal vision glasses" are designed to distort peripheral vision, reduce depth perception and blur vision to simulate the effects of having a blood-alcohol level of 0.10 percent, said Gimbel, director of Sheppard Pratt's Office of Substance Abuse Education.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | March 23, 1994
The best things on TV tonight are on cable, which is becoming an increasingly common observation, especially on Wednesday nights. Network TV highlights include a groovy episode of "Beverly Hills, 90210," in which the cast members show up in flower-power regalia as part of a '60s "flashback" episode. Don't be bummed, though: a diary, not LSD, triggers the flashback.* " Beverly Hills, 90210" (8-9 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- Jason Priestley, who plays Brandon, directs this episode, which has Brenda (Shannen Doherty)
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By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | November 15, 1991
THERE IS A reason that the repulsive crazed-killer murder stories, the type that is flooding the November airwaves, make such attractive television, and "In a Child's Name" reminds us of what that is.When properly made, these are compelling, dramatic tales that, in shining their raking light across the psyche of an individual and a community, can reveal the strengths and flaws of the human condition.But most of the movies that have trod this well-worn path this month have not done that. They have instead been nothing more than exploitative, voyeuristic excursions into the weirdness.
NEWS
April 25, 1991
Deaths elsewhereDennis H. Eisman, 50, a defense lawyer involved in the "Fatal Vision" murder case, was found fatally shot Tuesday in his parked car in Philadelphia. An autopsy was scheduled to determine if the death was a homicide or a suicide. Police recovered a handgun registered to Mr. Eisman. He and his former law partner, Bernard L. Segal, had represented Green Beret Army surgeon Jeffrey McDonald, who was accused in 1970 of brutally murdering his pregnant wife and two young daughters at Fort Bragg, N.C. Mr. Eisman and Mr. Segal represented McDonald during Army hearings that resulted in the dismissal of military charges, Mr. Segal said.
NEWS
October 30, 1994
James J. Norwood, 63, the general secretary-treasurer of the Laborers' International Union of North America, died Monday of complications from leukemia in a St. Louis hospital. The St. Louis resident took over the second-highest position of the 700,000-member union in February 1993. He specialized in negotiating and administering agreements with the construction industry.John Gatti, 76, mayor of San Antonio from 1971 to 1973, died in San Antonio Tuesday of a stroke. He was an investment banker and stockbroker.
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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | February 15, 1991
"Love, Lies and Murder" is the miniseries of the year.The two-parter, which begins at 9 Sunday on NBC (Channel 2), is distinguished by exceptional acting and a story of great psychological and sociological resonance."Love, Lies and Murder" is about the Brown family of Southern California. It revolves around the murder of the mother and the roles of the father and one of the daughters in that murder. It is a story of psychological manipulation, murder, love and madness. The headline to this story: Daddy is a psycho.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | November 27, 1993
Even the broadcast networks, I guess, deserve a vacation every once in a while. That's the only explanation I can muster for tonight's programming in prime time, which is so far from prime it's not even funny -- and certainly isn't worth watching. Cable offers virtually the only offerings worth sampling, and even there it's slim pickings -- Thanksgiving weekend holiday leftovers.* "The American Music Awards 20th Anniversary" (8-10 p.m., WJZ-Channel 13) -- Still scurrying for weekly replacements for "The Paula Poundstone Show," ABC tonight settles on this quickie special from Dick Clark Productions, which is a scary "innovation" for a TV awards show.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | October 2, 1991
In the annals of crime, there are serial murderers, and then there are serial authors. Perhaps there was a moment when Joe McGinniss -- author of "Fatal Vision," the grisly story of an Army doctor who killed his pregnant wife and two daughters, and then "Blind Faith," another grisly story about a wife-killer -- felt like scrawling across his bathroom mirror, "Stop me before I write again." If there was, it passed.In his latest book, "Cruel Doubt," to be published this month by Simon & Schuster, Mr. McGinniss, who is 48, has once again immersed himself in the details of a small-town family murder.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | December 28, 2004
In Baltimore City MTA to offer additional service New Year's Eve The Maryland Transit Administration will add service Friday night to accommodate watchers of New Year's Eve fireworks at the Inner Harbor. Metro and light rail will have regular service for one hour after the end of the fireworks display, according to MTA officials. Information: 410-539-5000 or www.mtamaryland.com. Baltimore impound lots announce holiday hours Baltimore transportation officials have announced holiday hours for the city's impound lots for New Year's Eve and New Year's Day. The Pulaski Highway Impound Lot, at 6700 Pulaski Highway, will be open from 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Friday.
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By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | November 8, 1993
It's a Monday with nothing really special on tap, but with weekly series doing their best to provide something that may get attention -- like, say, Hugh Hefner on two NBC sitcoms, or Mike Wallace and Orrin Hatch on one CBS sitcom.* "The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air" (8-8:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- Hilary (Karyn Parsons) takes Will (Will Smith) to a party -- at the Playboy Mansion, where Hugh Hefner is in attendance. NBC.* "I'll Fly Away" (8-9 p.m., WETA, Channel 26) -- The primary characters on this fine series adjust their allegiances a bit tonight, as Forrest (Sam Waterston)
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