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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,Contributing Writer | April 14, 1992
Q: More and more articles recommend that total fat intake should be 30 percent or less of total calories. Can you suggest a simple way to determine how much fat I can eat and yet stay within these guidelines?A: This simple calculation is suggested by Dr. Kristen McNutt:For the purpose of illustration, let us suppose your average caloric intake is 2,100 calories daily.* Cross out the final digit in the number of calories eaten each day. Thus, 2,100 is converted to 210.* Divide this number by 3.The resulting number (70)
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By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 18, 2007
Despite some high hopes, a diet loaded with fruits and vegetables doesn't seem to help women survive breast cancer, researchers reported yesterday. But experts said that doesn't mean cheeseburgers and beer are the way to go. Even though it hasn't been proved, "There's a lot of evidence from observational studies that maintaining a healthy weight and moderate or no alcohol consumption are associated with lower risk" of breast cancer, said Susan Gapstur, associate...
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By Kim Pierce and Kim Pierce,Universal Press Syndicate | February 16, 1992
Got the holidays behind you now?Really behind -- to the tune of five pounds, eight pounds? Twenty?Americans gain an average of seven pounds between Thanksgiving and New Year's, says Neva Cochran, spokesperson for the American Dietetic Association, and they spend a good part of January and February trying to get it off.One of the easiest methods is to limit fat intake by counting fat grams. No calories to count, no percentages to calculate, no exchanges to juggle. And people still get to eat cherished foods -- without the guilt.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Stephanie Shapiro and Joe Burris and Stephanie Shapiro,sun reporters | September 28, 2006
In New York City, the eating-out capital of the country, trans fats may soon all but disappear from restaurant food. Similar restrictions are on the table in Chicago. Will Baltimore, the city that enjoys funnel cakes, Reuben sandwiches and seasoned fries, follow suit? "I think all restaurants need to take a look," said Dr. Joshua Sharfstein, Baltimore's health commissioner. "There's nothing stopping the transition starting in Baltimore now from less-healthy foods to healthy foods, using alternatives to trans fats.
NEWS
September 26, 2004
Saturated fat is the main dietary cause of high blood cholesterol. The American Heart Association recommends that you limit your saturated fat intake to 7-10 percent of total calories (or less) each day. Saturated fat is found mostly in foods from animals and some plants. -- American Heart Association
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 21, 1996
Are there any dietary measures that protect against breast cancer? I have heard -fat diet reduces the likelihood of developing breast cancer.One of the early reasons to suspect that a low-fat diet might prevent breast cancer was the finding that the number of breast cancers is about five times greater in countries where people consume a high-fat diet than in those countries where fat intake is low. And over the years, a number of newspaper stories and...
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | March 30, 1993
We all thought we were being so good to reduce our fat intake by switching from butter to margarine. Now a March 1993 study published in the British medical journal, Lancet, indicates that women who eat more than 4 teaspoons of margarine a day are at an increased risk of heart disease.What's a woman to do? To find out, I met with Dr. Ben Caballero, director of the division of Nutrition at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health and asked him to answer our questions.*Q. Did we do the wrong thing by switching from butter to margarine?
FEATURES
By Carleton Jones | April 17, 1991
Here are two observations on diet and health by specialists in preventive medicine:*"For about 20 years, dietary fat has been suspected as a causal factor in two very common cancers: bowel and breast. The suspicion has been based in part on the observation that these cancers are most common in developed countries, where dietary fat intake is very high. Also in animal experiments, high-fat diets have favored the development of these cancers." At the same time there is evidence that the vitamin A group (carotenoids)
FEATURES
By Colleen Pierre, R.D. and Colleen Pierre, R.D.,Contributing Writer | March 31, 1992
I know you're going to laugh when you read this, but prune brownies are really pretty good.All kidding aside, the California Prune Board has been experimenting with substituting prune puree or prune butter for butter, margarine or oil, measure for measure, in standard recipes for muffins, cakes and cookies. (In a recipe that calls for 1/4 cup of butter or oil, substitute 1/4 cup of prune puree.)The brownie samples they provided were really chocolaty and good. The texture was a little different, spongy rather than chewy.
NEWS
By THOMAS H. MAUGH II AND JIA-RUI CHONG and THOMAS H. MAUGH II AND JIA-RUI CHONG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 8, 2006
Overturning three decades of conventional wisdom, a 13-year study of low-fat diets in nearly 50,000 healthy older women has shown that reducing fat intake alone does not significantly reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, breast cancer or colorectal cancer, researchers reported yesterday. Results from the same study, reported last month, also showed that reducing fats without reducing calories does not lead to significant weight loss. "Just switching to low-fat foods is not likely to yield much health benefit in most women," said Marcia Stefanick, a professor of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center.
NEWS
By THOMAS H. MAUGH II AND JIA-RUI CHONG and THOMAS H. MAUGH II AND JIA-RUI CHONG,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 8, 2006
Overturning three decades of conventional wisdom, a 13-year study of low-fat diets in nearly 50,000 healthy older women has shown that reducing fat intake alone does not significantly reduce the risk of heart disease, stroke, breast cancer or colorectal cancer, researchers reported yesterday. Results from the same study, reported last month, also showed that reducing fats without reducing calories does not lead to significant weight loss. "Just switching to low-fat foods is not likely to yield much health benefit in most women," said Marcia Stefanick, a professor of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center.
NEWS
September 26, 2004
Saturated fat is the main dietary cause of high blood cholesterol. The American Heart Association recommends that you limit your saturated fat intake to 7-10 percent of total calories (or less) each day. Saturated fat is found mostly in foods from animals and some plants. -- American Heart Association
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | December 24, 1997
In a study that could complicate popular notions of healthy eating, researchers found that middle-aged men who ate diets high in total fats seemed to lower their risk of stroke.Scientists with the Harvard Medical School and Boston University found that men eating the largest amounts of total fat suffered the lowest rates of ischemic stroke, a potentially fatal condition caused by the interruption of blood flow to the brain.Two types of fats -- saturated and monounsaturated -- were particularly linked to the low stroke rates.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 21, 1996
Are there any dietary measures that protect against breast cancer? I have heard -fat diet reduces the likelihood of developing breast cancer.One of the early reasons to suspect that a low-fat diet might prevent breast cancer was the finding that the number of breast cancers is about five times greater in countries where people consume a high-fat diet than in those countries where fat intake is low. And over the years, a number of newspaper stories and...
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | August 24, 1993
"I mean, my fat is just so high today. I had donuts for breakfast.""Me, too. My stomach is, like, sticking so far out."I listened in to the conversation as I chauffeured my daughter and her friend around one morning. Though just 7 and 6 years old, they sounded like a couple of world-weary Valley Girls. "I mean, like, rilly. . . ."But it was the topic, not the tone of voice, that set off alarms in my head. Here were two babies, leggy and mannequin-thin from a summer of swim team, fretting about their fat intake and pouchy tummies.
FEATURES
By Cara De Silva and Cara De Silva,Newsday | June 9, 1993
The night was lively and warm, the scent of grass and magnolias was in the air, and Marie Squerciati, a TV writer and New York mother, felt summer in her heart. "I wanted to celebrate," she said, "and not with ice milk or no-fat frozen yogurt. I wanted the perfect ice cream cone."If pollsters and pundits are right, Ms. Squerciati is part of a trend, building for several years and now sweeping the country: an inclination to indulge ourselves a little more, to discipline ourselves a little less and to be more forgiving about all of it."
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 19, 1993
A new study has failed to find a clear-cut connection betwee dietary fat and breast cancer. But researchers and commentators cautioned that it was too early to rule out a link.In the study, being published today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, researchers analyzed the body fat of 380 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer, and compared the findings with a similar fat analysis of 176 women with benign breast disease and 397 women without any breast disease.Since the constituents of body fat represent dietary habits going back at least two years, the analysis is believed to reflect people's dietary habits more accurately than just asking them what they eat.The researchers, from Los Angeles and Boston, checked the body fat samples for levels of saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, trans and omega-3 fatty acids.
NEWS
By Judy Peres and Judy Peres,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 18, 2007
Despite some high hopes, a diet loaded with fruits and vegetables doesn't seem to help women survive breast cancer, researchers reported yesterday. But experts said that doesn't mean cheeseburgers and beer are the way to go. Even though it hasn't been proved, "There's a lot of evidence from observational studies that maintaining a healthy weight and moderate or no alcohol consumption are associated with lower risk" of breast cancer, said Susan Gapstur, associate...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 19, 1993
A new study has failed to find a clear-cut connection betwee dietary fat and breast cancer. But researchers and commentators cautioned that it was too early to rule out a link.In the study, being published today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, researchers analyzed the body fat of 380 women newly diagnosed with breast cancer, and compared the findings with a similar fat analysis of 176 women with benign breast disease and 397 women without any breast disease.Since the constituents of body fat represent dietary habits going back at least two years, the analysis is believed to reflect people's dietary habits more accurately than just asking them what they eat.The researchers, from Los Angeles and Boston, checked the body fat samples for levels of saturated, monounsaturated, polyunsaturated, trans and omega-3 fatty acids.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Contributing Writer | March 30, 1993
We all thought we were being so good to reduce our fat intake by switching from butter to margarine. Now a March 1993 study published in the British medical journal, Lancet, indicates that women who eat more than 4 teaspoons of margarine a day are at an increased risk of heart disease.What's a woman to do? To find out, I met with Dr. Ben Caballero, director of the division of Nutrition at the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health and asked him to answer our questions.*Q. Did we do the wrong thing by switching from butter to margarine?
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