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NEWS
By JUDY REILLY | March 2, 1995
On the sunny Saturday afternoon I visited members of the youth group at St. Paul's United Methodist Church in New Windsor, they were on the 15th hour of a 30-hour famine.In the warren of church basement rooms, some teens were putting together a board game, others were writing a skit and some were lounging on sleeping bags and relaxing to rock music on the radio. It seemed like any other teen "lock in" on an ordinary weekend. Except these young people were hungry -- very hungry.Under the direction of their youth group leaders and with inspiration and guidelines from World Vision, the international organization that sponsored the event, the dozen teens decided to spend a weekend fasting and becoming more aware of world hunger.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Ahead of new rules requiring chain restaurants to post calorie counts for their menu items, some of the restaurants are voluntarily introducing lower calorie selections. The new items tend to be salads rather than the main attractions such as burgers and pizza, but they contain an average of 60 fewer calories or a reduction of 12 percent, researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health found. The researchers looked at new menu items in 2012 and 2013, ahead of new rules to offer the public nutritional information required by the Affordable Care Act. And they said the results, published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, could be the beginning of a trend in calorie reduction at fast food restaurants that aids the obesity epidemic.
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NEWS
By Kim Barker and Kim Barker,Chicago Tribune | October 15, 2006
JAIPUR, India -- Kaila Devi Hirawat is killing herself slowly, starving her way to salvation as her neighbors and family members watch. Hirawat, 93, a frail, birdlike woman, has eaten nothing in more than a month, attempting to free her soul from its bad deeds, part of the Jain religious tradition, which says that fasting can lead to nirvana. "I'm very happy," said her son, Shantichand Hirawat, 70, smiling. "It's good for her, and it's good for the whole family." Her fast has landed her in the middle of a controversy pitting the freedom of religion guaranteed by the Indian Constitution against a law banning suicide.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | September 15, 2014
After three years mixing, bottling and boxing natural personal care products to be sold in local shops at their home in Annapolis, Robert and Zoe Benzinger are poised for bigger things. For the first time their company, eco-armour, will be among the exhibitors starting Wednesday at Natural Products Expo East 2014 in Baltimore, billed as the largest trade show on the East Coast devoted to goods made from ingredients found in nature treated with relatively little processing. The industry says sales of natural food for people and pets, diet supplements, and cosmetics and grooming products are growing about 8 percent a year.
FEATURES
By Dr. Gabe Mirkin and Dr. Gabe Mirkin,Contributing Writer United Feature Syndicate | May 25, 1993
Several articles have appeared in sports magazines advocating fasting before athletic competitions. But fasting will markedly hinder performance by making you tire earlier.Fasting before competition became popular as the result of an article that appeared in the Journal of Applied Physiology. It showed that rats that fasted for 24 hours could run farther than they could after they ate. How long you can exercise a muscle depends on how much sugar you can store in a muscle before you start to exercise.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,Sun Staff Writer | February 27, 1995
At a Westview mosque called Masjid-al-Rahmah, it's not just the adults who are fasting this month for Ramadan, but many of the 83 children attending the adjacent school.Muslim adults must fast during daylight all month to receive forgiveness and blessings from Allah. The children at the private, Muslim Al-Rahmah School school next door fast voluntarily.Ramadan, which falls this year in February, marks the revelation of Islam's holy book, the Koran, to the Prophet Mohammed -- a process that began in 610 and took 23 years.
NEWS
By Frank Langfitt and Frank Langfitt,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2003
When Muzaffar Shaikh celebrated his first Ramadan in America two decades ago, it was a test of faith. Ramadan is the holy month when Muslims fast from dawn until sundown every day. Shaikh, who had arrived from Pakistan, studied most of the day, then worked a nine-hour shift managing a Manhattan candy store. Despite his hunger pangs, he said, he never ate the Milky Ways or Almond Joy bars an arm's length away. "It was a very tough time," recalled Shaikh, 42, who works as a technology consultant in Windsor Mill.
NEWS
By Ashraf Khalil and Ashraf Khalil,Los Angeles Times | October 21, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- As the sun slowly descended toward the Pacific Ocean, Amin Momand watched it, and his teammates watched him watching it. It was an October team dinner the night before a Palos Verdes High School football game. But Momand, a starting defensive end for the Sea Kings and a Muslim, couldn't eat - couldn't even sip water - until the sun disappeared, according to the rules of Ramadan. When darkness finally came and he took a drink, there was a communal sigh of relief. Some teammates applauded.
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 10, 2000
Thousands of Howard County Christians celebrated Ash Wednesday this week, marking the beginning the Lenten season of penitence, fasting and abstinence that commemorates Christ's 40 days of fasting and temptations in the desert. The symbol of ashes is borrowed from the Jews, who from ancient times combined ashes with sackcloth to indicate penitence or sorrow for one's sins. Ellicott City's Church of the Resurrection began Lent with a schedule of four Masses, including a morning Mass for children in its school.
NEWS
By DAVID KOHN and DAVID KOHN,SUN REPORTER | July 23, 2006
Do not eat or drink anything after midnight the night before your surgery. To anyone who has had planned surgery or helped care for someone who has had it, these are familiar words. What they mean is that you are likely to spend the day of surgery not only nervous about the operation but also hungry, thirsty and perhaps light-headed. Your torment was probably in vain. It turns out that the widespread practice of keeping patients' stomachs empty overnight has little evidence to back it up. Critics say that doctors who follow the approach are choosing discredited tradition over up-to-date science - perhaps for their own convenience.
SPORTS
By Aaron Wilson and The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
When the Ravens drafted imposing Virginia defensive end Brent Urban in the fourth round, the hope was that he would be fully ready by training camp after undergoing ankle surgery in February following the Senior Bowl. Urban is already well ahead of that schedule, though, as he was able to participate in everything this spring after being sidelined for a rookie minicamp. During the first week of training camp, the 6-foot-6, 298-pound former hockey player from Canada hasn't experienced any setbacks.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2014
The idea for the business came to Greg Vetter shortly after a friend swiped a two-liter bottle of his mom's homemade lemon-garlic salad dressing from his refrigerator. Inspired by the lengths someone would go to for a dressing by "Tessemae," his mom's nickname, Vetter challenged her: If he got Whole Foods to sell the dressing, she would go into business with him. "She said, 'That's never going to happen,'" he recalled. Five years later Vetter, 31, is CEO of an Essex-based company - Tessemae's - that makes the top-selling dressing in the produce department at Whole Foods.
NEWS
May 19, 2014
One of the marvels of the Internet to date is that it's largely been a level playing field where there is equal access to all (at least those not blocked by oppressive governments), an arrangement that has not only encouraged innovation and investment but greatly benefited ordinary consumers. U.S. officials keep claiming to support so-called "net neutrality," but interpretations of what that means seem to vary widely. At least that explains how last week the Federal Communications Commission could issue rules that reportedly uphold net neutrality but also raise the possibility of pay-for-preference treatment.
SPORTS
By Jeff Zrebiec, The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2014
Keith Wenning exhibited nice touch in hitting wide receiver Jeremy Butler down the right sideline. Several plays later, Wenning found tight end Crockett Gillmore in the middle of the field, one of several catches on the day for the third-round selection. The Ball State quarterback, who was taken in the sixth round of last week's draft, showed plenty of accuracy and arm strength on the second official day of the Ravens' rookie minicamp. But it's everything leading up to the 6-foot-3 quarterback bringing back his right arm and letting the ball go that has been the biggest challenge for Wenning this week.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | May 16, 2014
In 1886, the New York Times and the Chicago News engaged in a mild war of words over whether it is necessary for a gentleman to remove his hat on an elevator when there are ladies in the car. More than 100 years later, the estimable Miss Manners, the final authority on all things polite and impolite, was asked to enumerate the rules of elevator etiquette. Her most memorable declaration might have been that if you fail to successfully hold the door open for an approaching passenger "assume a look of regretful ineptitude to show that person that nothing personal was intended.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | May 15, 2014
The Baltimore & Maryland Workers Assembly will host a protest Thursday calling for higher wages for fast food workers, one of dozens happening around the world. The groups backing the effort, which calls for a $15 wage, say protests and strikes will occur in more than 150 cities in the U.S. and 33 countries. Similar one-day events, bankrolled largely by the Service Employees International Union and promoted by community groups, have been staged for more than a year. State lawmakers last month passed a law to increase the minimum wage in stages, reaching $10.10 per hour by 2018.
NEWS
By Ginger Thompson and Ginger Thompson,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1996
Ann Coster, a Roman Catholic who lives in Reisterstown, says that even at age 63 she succumbs to peer pressure and joins friends in office gossip. But since Lent began five weeks ago, she's tried to walk away. She's striving, she says, to "act more like Christ."Dr. DeeDee Mazyck, an Episcopalian from Columbia, has given up watching daytime soap operas for Lent. A retired pediatrician, she acknowledges that the soaps are filled with mindless intrigue and sex scenes. Still, she says, the programs can "draw you in and become too much a part of your life."
SPORTS
By Dan Connolly and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
Orioles outfielder Nelson Cruz played the past eight seasons with the Texas Rangers, hitting the first 157 home runs of his career. When his free-agent market seemed to be crashing this winter, it was rumored that Cruz would simply return to Arlington, Texas, where he has batted .294 (26 points higher than his .268 career average) and blasted 92 home runs in 400 career games. Instead, the Orioles jumped in and grabbed Cruz on a one-year, $8 million deal and brought him to another place that has seen its share of home runs over the years: Camden Yards.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | April 30, 2014
The Aberdeen IronBirds have announced a promotions schedule for the 2014 season. Fan favorites such as Fireworks Nights and Dollar Dog Days return, along with new promotions including the world-famous Cowboy Monkey Rodeo act. The IronBirds will also host a Ripken bobblehead series featuring the likes of Cal, Bill and Cal Sr.   "We are excited to announce our promotion schedule," IronBirds' General Manager Joe Harrington said. "We have received positive feedback from our fans on some of the traditional favorites, but are equally as excited to provide our fans with fresh, next acts including the always entertaining Cowboy Monkey Rodeo.
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