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NEWS
February 3, 1997
AS AMERICA's chief battler in economic diplomacy, U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky has assured senators she will be tough on the Chinese, tough on the Japanese and tough on any other nation seeking to thwart the U.S. drive for freer market access everywhere. But her main job may be to get tough with senators about to confirm her, with their colleagues in the House and with the White House.At the top of her priority list is the need for "fast track" authority to negotiate trade agreements that won't be torn apart by protectionists and other special interest groups in Congress.
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BUSINESS
By Marilyn Geewax and Marilyn Geewax,Cox News Service | March 8, 2007
WASHINGTON -- Democrats are demonstrating this week their new power to influence U.S. trade policy, announcing demands and scheduling hearings before considering whether to renew President Bush's power to negotiate trade deals on a "fast track." With Bush's trade promotion authority expiring June 30, the White House is hoping to quietly work out a deal with key Democrats before introducing renewal legislation. Recently, U.S. Trade Representative Susan C. Schwab said in an interview that her office was "engaged in a conversation with the Congress ... to determine how broad and what the duration should be" for such trade authority.
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NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 15, 1991
WASHINGTON -- President Bush came closer to his dream of a gigantic North American free-trade zone yesterday when two key congressional committees approved legislation to minimize Capitol Hill's role in impending trade negotiations.Both the Senate Finance Committee and the House Ways and Means Committee endorsed bills granting two-year extensions in the president's "fast-track" authority to conclude trade agreements. Under fast-track procedures, Congress has 60 days to accept or reject a completed trade treaty, without any changes.
NEWS
By Julie Hirschfeld Davis and Julie Hirschfeld Davis,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 2, 2002
WASHINGTON - In a big victory for President Bush, the Senate voted yesterday to allow him to negotiate trade deals that Congress could accept or reject but not amend. Bush has called such presidential authority vital to America's economy. The bill, which has passed the House and awaits Bush's signature, will revive a power that presidents wielded for two decades before it lapsed eight years ago. It had been stalled in Congress ever since. The margin was a comfortable 64-34, with 20 Democrats joining 43 Republicans and one independent in favor.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 2, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's controversial "fast-track" trade bill cleared a key hurdle in Congress yesterday, bolstering its chances for passage despite opposition by labor, environmentalists and GOP conservatives.On a voice vote reflecting bipartisan support, the Senate Finance Committee formally approved a bill that essentially parallels the one that Clinton sent Congress, paving the way for floor action in that chamber later this month.The lopsided vote in committee is expected to provide political cover for more senators to support the bill, which would strengthen Clinton's hand in negotiating trade pacts.
NEWS
May 23, 1991
Six of the eight Marylanders in the House of Representatives are expected to vote this morning to give President Bush the authority he needs to negotiate trade agreements with Mexico and other countries that cannot be picked apart through subsequent congressional action. This is a pretty good ratio considering the power of organized labor, now the most protectionist force in America.Only Republican Helen Delich Bentley, xenophobic as always on trade, and Democrat Kweisi Mfume seem determined to oppose the president.
NEWS
March 2, 1993
President Clinton's "fast track" authority to negotiate trade agreements Congress cannot pick apart but must vote up or down effectively expires today. Sooner or later he will have to go to the mat on this issue. Not only is the future of world trade reform at stake; so is the credibility of his domestic economic strategy. No mistake about it: the U.S. economy cannot prosper unless the global economy pulls out of its doldrums through healthy growth in international commerce.That Mr. Clinton, world statesman, understands this well was underscored by his American University speech last Friday in which he said: "In the face of all the pressures to do the reverse, we must compete, not retreat.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 10, 1991
WASHINGTON -- House Majority Leader Richard A. Gephardt, D-Mo., a presidential hopeful whose last White House bid was closely identified with a get-tough trade policy, warily jumped on the free-trade bandwagon yesterday, announcing that he would conditionally support the Bush administration's request for "fast-track" authority to negotiate a free-trade agreement with Mexico."
NEWS
October 29, 1995
DEADLOCK BETWEEN Republican free-trade purists and a Clinton administration vulnerable to pressure from labor and environmental groups has all but doomed prospects for early legislation that would allow the United States to pursue new trade agreements in credible fashion.At issue is the "fast trade" authority that has enabled recent presidents to negotiate trade agreements that have to be voted up or down by Congress without being picked apart by special-interest amendments. This power was essential in establishing U.S. bona fides with other countries in drawing up pacts establishing NAFTA and a new World Trade Organization.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 2, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Weeks after his victory over Iraq, President Bush has picked a fight with a different kind of adversary -- congressional opponents of U.S. trade policy.At stake is the issue of whether to demolish trade barriers with Mexico, in an agreement similar to the one the Reagan administration negotiated with Canada. The result would be the world's largest free-trade zone, a tariff-free region encompassing all of North America that would, claimed Mr. Bush, energize and stimulate economies from the "Yukon to the Yucatan."
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - Acting on one of President Bush's top legislative priorities, the Senate voted by a wide margin last night to give him expanded authority to negotiate trade deals, while granting new benefits to workers who lose jobs to foreign competition. The 66-30 vote sends the bill into what are likely to be contentious negotiations with the House, which has passed a far different version of the measure. "Today's passage by the Senate of a vital package of trade legislation is a critical step in advancing America's trade agenda and strengthening the U.S. economy," Bush said in a statement issued while he was in Moscow.
NEWS
By Jack W. Germond & Jules Witcover | November 12, 1997
WASHINGTON -- In 1993, organized labor fought the enactment of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) tooth and nail, threatening severe retribution at the polls against members of Congress who voted for it. But the legislation putting negotiations with Mexico and Canada on a fast track passed and labor's threat fizzled in the 1994 congressional elections, reinforcing criticism that politically it 55 was a paper tiger.A successFour years later, without issuing so categorical a threat against the good legislators, organized labor has been at least temporarily successful in stalling similar fast-track negotiating authority for dealings with other Latin American countries.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Dealt an embarrassing setback by his own party, President Clinton vowed yesterday to keep fighting to win "fast-track" authority to negotiate trade deals, and he predicted he would eventually prevail."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 2, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton's controversial "fast-track" trade bill cleared a key hurdle in Congress yesterday, bolstering its chances for passage despite opposition by labor, environmentalists and GOP conservatives.On a voice vote reflecting bipartisan support, the Senate Finance Committee formally approved a bill that essentially parallels the one that Clinton sent Congress, paving the way for floor action in that chamber later this month.The lopsided vote in committee is expected to provide political cover for more senators to support the bill, which would strengthen Clinton's hand in negotiating trade pacts.
NEWS
By Carl M. Cannon and Carl M. Cannon,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | September 11, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Bucking organized labor and Democratic leaders in Congress once again, President Clinton launched another fight over global trade yesterday.In a reprise of his uphill -- and ultimately successful -- fight four years ago to get the North American Free Trade Agreement approved, Clinton is seeking "fast-track" authority to negotiate trade agreements with foreign countries.Under fast-track, a power routinely granted every president since the mid-1970s, the administration is given authority to hammer out trade agreements that Congress can vote either up or down -- without amending or altering the proposed treaty.
NEWS
February 3, 1997
AS AMERICA's chief battler in economic diplomacy, U.S. Trade Representative Charlene Barshefsky has assured senators she will be tough on the Chinese, tough on the Japanese and tough on any other nation seeking to thwart the U.S. drive for freer market access everywhere. But her main job may be to get tough with senators about to confirm her, with their colleagues in the House and with the White House.At the top of her priority list is the need for "fast track" authority to negotiate trade agreements that won't be torn apart by protectionists and other special interest groups in Congress.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 24, 2002
WASHINGTON - Acting on one of President Bush's top legislative priorities, the Senate voted by a wide margin last night to give him expanded authority to negotiate trade deals, while granting new benefits to workers who lose jobs to foreign competition. The 66-30 vote sends the bill into what are likely to be contentious negotiations with the House, which has passed a far different version of the measure. "Today's passage by the Senate of a vital package of trade legislation is a critical step in advancing America's trade agenda and strengthening the U.S. economy," Bush said in a statement issued while he was in Moscow.
NEWS
December 15, 1993
With closure at last within reach for a new world trade agreement before an unbreakable deadline at midnight tonight, governments around the globe are bracing for inevitable controversies at home. There will be winners and losers in every country, including this one, but only rejection by the U.S. Congress could scotch the deal. Americans can anticipate a battle royal on Capital Hill comparable to the fight over the North American Free Trade Agreement.In the parliamentary systems of most other industrial democracies, ruling governments or coalitions usually settle such matters within the orbit of executive power.
NEWS
October 29, 1995
DEADLOCK BETWEEN Republican free-trade purists and a Clinton administration vulnerable to pressure from labor and environmental groups has all but doomed prospects for early legislation that would allow the United States to pursue new trade agreements in credible fashion.At issue is the "fast trade" authority that has enabled recent presidents to negotiate trade agreements that have to be voted up or down by Congress without being picked apart by special-interest amendments. This power was essential in establishing U.S. bona fides with other countries in drawing up pacts establishing NAFTA and a new World Trade Organization.
NEWS
December 15, 1993
With closure at last within reach for a new world trade agreement before an unbreakable deadline at midnight tonight, governments around the globe are bracing for inevitable controversies at home. There will be winners and losers in every country, including this one, but only rejection by the U.S. Congress could scotch the deal. Americans can anticipate a battle royal on Capital Hill comparable to the fight over the North American Free Trade Agreement.In the parliamentary systems of most other industrial democracies, ruling governments or coalitions usually settle such matters within the orbit of executive power.
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