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By GILBERT SANDLER | July 12, 1994
LET'S HIT the rewind button on our imaginary VCR to find out how Baltimoreans used to keep cool in the good ol' summertime.Tape 1: It's dusk on a hot summer night in the early 1950s and crowds jam a dairy store, buying ice cream, chocolate milk, milk shakes. It's Emerson's Farms, located at Green Spring Valley and Falls roads.Baltimoreans would travel to the store, which closed in 1954, on summer nights for some cooler rural air as well as dairy treats.Tape 2: Not everyone headed to the country to escape the heat; many had no way to get there.
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FEATURES
By Steve Zeitchik and Steve Zeitchik,Tribune Newspapers | January 1, 2010
Contemporary Hollywood can feel like a creatively stagnant place, stocked with remakes, sequels and vehicles inspired by toys and television. But for anyone worried that the movie business has an originality problem, 2009 offered plenty of evidence to the contrary. Could that be a harbinger for the new movie year? True, studios in 2009 ransacked the 20th century for time-tested properties like "Star Trek" and "G.I. Joe" and went back to the global-disaster well for the umpteenth time with "2012."
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SPORTS
October 2, 2006
Replay It was easy to overlook the defense Saturday, but that unit forced a big three-and-out in the fourth quarter and two first-quarter turnovers, and beat up Connecticut quarterback Matt Bonislawski all day. Erase Up 14-0 with a chance to deliver a first-quarter knockout, one of the game's least-penalized teams went haywire. After recovering a fumble at the UConn 26, Navy committed four penalties and punted from the UConn 41. Fast forward Look for another close one. Navy has won three straight against the Falcons, each by a field goal.
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE | September 24, 2007
Replay Navy's second half. The Mids' defense, after giving up 36 points in the first half, allowed just seven in the second. Rover Ketric Buffin made an interception with 38 seconds left, giving Navy just enough time to set up for Joey Bullen's 44-yard field goal as time expired. Erase The first half, when Duke scored on five of seven possessions, and Navy failed to recognize big pass plays to Eron Riley that went for touchdowns of 76, 35, 9 yards. Fast forward Navy (2-2) faces rival Air Force (3-1)
SPORTS
By SANDRA MCKEE | September 24, 2007
Replay Navy's second half. The Mids' defense, after giving up 36 points in the first half, allowed just seven in the second. Rover Ketric Buffin made an interception with 38 seconds left, giving Navy just enough time to set up for Joey Bullen's 44-yard field goal as time expired. Erase The first half, when Duke scored on five of seven possessions, and Navy failed to recognize big pass plays to Eron Riley that went for touchdowns of 76, 35, 9 yards. Fast forward Navy (2-2) faces rival Air Force (3-1)
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2003
The manager's job is on the line. Up and down the roster, there are questions about which players will be back next year. And the Orioles have just 71 more games to sort out the answers. On the surface, it looks like this team is heading for another ho-hum, fourth-place finish in the American League East. But for a team that started pointing at 2004 a long time ago, there's a lot at stake over the next 11 weeks. In their first year atop the Orioles' baseball operations department, Jim Beattie and Mike Flanagan have taken a patient approach, but soon they will have to make a flurry of major decisions.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht | September 11, 2006
Navy has never had a full-blown quarterback controversy under fifth-year coach Paul Johnson, but the Midshipmen (2-0) could be headed into the thick of one this week. After Navy's 21-20 victory over Massachusetts, during which Johnson juggled senior starter Brian Hampton and sophomore backup Kaipo-Noa Kaheaku-Enhada all day, only to watch both - particularly Hampton - struggle running the option and throwing the ball, Johnson was undecided about who will start at Stanford on Saturday. Navy@Stanford Saturday 10 p.m., 1090 AM, 1050 AM, 1370 AM, 1430 AM Replay UP --Navy's senior-laden defense stood tall, as the Mids held UMass to six points and 80 yards in the second half.
NEWS
By Nancy Noyes | December 22, 1991
The first half of Annapolis Yacht Club's popular Frostbite Series, which began Nov. 3, came to an end last Sunday with two brisk and breezy contests for the six-division fleet.Since the tally of races completed came to only 10 of a possible 14 over the seven-week series,there will be no worst-race throw-outs. So, many of those who gambled by staying home for a race or two, or who suffered a disqualification, penalty, or a weak finish or two, will have to keep those expensive point scores in their accounting.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | May 27, 1995
He spent a long time making hit movies that got scant respect from Hollywood artistes, but Steven Spielberg now basks in the glow of an American Film Institute salute tonight, while Kevin Costner comes back with more of his miniseries treatise on the Indian experience.* "Fast Forward" (1 p.m.-1:30 p.m., WMAR, Channel 2) -- The local station launches a new monthly magazine program for kids. The first edition includes profiles of positive role models: Oriole Cal Ripken Jr., figure skater Michelle Kwan and director Spike Lee.* "500 Nations" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13)
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2004
WAKES lashing the calm bay, searchlights stabbing the starry blackness. The Tangier crab pot fleet sallies from the harbor for another long day's pursuit of Callinectes sapidus, that savory, beautiful swimmer, the Chesapeake blue crab. What we have here is commerce, also culture. But ultimately we have art - the art of crabbing, to be sure; but even more profound, the artistry of the crab. There's a signature, a dance unique to the crab potter's craft. Watch from a vantage point on Tangier as the island's watermen spread out into the bay, spotlights locating the corks that mark the first string of pots.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | February 23, 2007
What makes Tavis Smiley run? That question has intrigued me ever since I met him 11 years ago in Los Angeles. He was 31 and a failed City Council candidate but a popular radio commentator, often the last refuge of failed politicians. Back then, he had just written a book of commentary and Time magazine had named him one of "50 Young Americans to Watch." Yet he was seeking my advice. "How do you do it?" he asked, wondering how I juggled a newspaper column, TV appearances, radio commentaries, my family and my sanity.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | February 19, 2007
COLLEGE PARK-- --The night's official attendance tied a mark set earlier in the season for the largest crowd to ever watch an Atlantic Coast Conference women's basketball game. Of course, many of those fans were passing under the exit signs as the final minutes of the Duke-Maryland season sequel ticked away. And as we watched the largest-crowd-to-ever-bail-early-on-an-ACC-game race to sit still in traffic, there were only a couple of thoughts worth having: It's a good thing last year's national championship wasn't played at Comcast Center, where for one day each year Duke coach Gail Goestenkors might as well have her name on the lease.
SPORTS
October 2, 2006
Replay It was easy to overlook the defense Saturday, but that unit forced a big three-and-out in the fourth quarter and two first-quarter turnovers, and beat up Connecticut quarterback Matt Bonislawski all day. Erase Up 14-0 with a chance to deliver a first-quarter knockout, one of the game's least-penalized teams went haywire. After recovering a fumble at the UConn 26, Navy committed four penalties and punted from the UConn 41. Fast forward Look for another close one. Navy has won three straight against the Falcons, each by a field goal.
SPORTS
By Gary Lambrecht | September 11, 2006
Navy has never had a full-blown quarterback controversy under fifth-year coach Paul Johnson, but the Midshipmen (2-0) could be headed into the thick of one this week. After Navy's 21-20 victory over Massachusetts, during which Johnson juggled senior starter Brian Hampton and sophomore backup Kaipo-Noa Kaheaku-Enhada all day, only to watch both - particularly Hampton - struggle running the option and throwing the ball, Johnson was undecided about who will start at Stanford on Saturday. Navy@Stanford Saturday 10 p.m., 1090 AM, 1050 AM, 1370 AM, 1430 AM Replay UP --Navy's senior-laden defense stood tall, as the Mids held UMass to six points and 80 yards in the second half.
SPORTS
By GARY LAMBRECHT | March 8, 2005
SITTING IN THE STANDS that night among thousands of other testy fans, watching the Clemson Tigers suck the life out of Comcast Center while the head coach of the Maryland Terrapins prowled the sideline, scowling at his team in disgust, I felt thankful. On a night when the Terps once again had reduced the game of basketball to a playground mess - and paid for it with the most embarrassing loss of the Gary Williams era - how lucky I was to be viewing the wreckage from a comfortable distance.
NEWS
By Ellen Goodman | March 7, 2005
BOSTON - This is one of those moments when you really can blame Hollywood for the culture wars. Not the Hollywood of Michael Moore and Mel Gibson, but the Hollywood of Cecil B. DeMille and Charlton Heston. Mr. DeMille was the mogul who bragged: "Give me any two pages of the Bible and I'll give you a picture." Almost a half-century ago, he took a few more pages and made The Ten Commandments. When the epic was done, Mr. DeMille went into publicity overdrive. He funded the Fraternal Order of Eagles' promotion of Ten Commandments displays.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | February 23, 2007
What makes Tavis Smiley run? That question has intrigued me ever since I met him 11 years ago in Los Angeles. He was 31 and a failed City Council candidate but a popular radio commentator, often the last refuge of failed politicians. Back then, he had just written a book of commentary and Time magazine had named him one of "50 Young Americans to Watch." Yet he was seeking my advice. "How do you do it?" he asked, wondering how I juggled a newspaper column, TV appearances, radio commentaries, my family and my sanity.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2001
The expectations for receiver Travis Taylor might as well be written on the wall. Inside the Ravens' war room, his name sits atop the team's draft board, just above first-round pick Todd Heap. It's a message, not a misprint. Taylor, the 10th overall pick in the 2000 draft, had his rookie season abruptly end with a broken collarbone in Week 9. Now, the Ravens want to reap the benefits from their year-long investment. "I'm ready for the challenge," said Taylor after the second day of the Ravens' minicamp.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2004
WAKES lashing the calm bay, searchlights stabbing the starry blackness. The Tangier crab pot fleet sallies from the harbor for another long day's pursuit of Callinectes sapidus, that savory, beautiful swimmer, the Chesapeake blue crab. What we have here is commerce, also culture. But ultimately we have art - the art of crabbing, to be sure; but even more profound, the artistry of the crab. There's a signature, a dance unique to the crab potter's craft. Watch from a vantage point on Tangier as the island's watermen spread out into the bay, spotlights locating the corks that mark the first string of pots.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2003
The manager's job is on the line. Up and down the roster, there are questions about which players will be back next year. And the Orioles have just 71 more games to sort out the answers. On the surface, it looks like this team is heading for another ho-hum, fourth-place finish in the American League East. But for a team that started pointing at 2004 a long time ago, there's a lot at stake over the next 11 weeks. In their first year atop the Orioles' baseball operations department, Jim Beattie and Mike Flanagan have taken a patient approach, but soon they will have to make a flurry of major decisions.
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