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By Brent Jones and Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2005
The Ravens have added yet another face to their coaching staff, hiring former New Mexico Highlands coach John Fassel as an offensive assistant yesterday. Fassel, 31, is the son of Jim Fassel, who was named the Ravens' offensive coordinator earlier this week. John Fassel becomes the sixth coach to join Brian Billick's staff since the end of the season. John Fassel's primary responsibilities will be breaking down film of opponents and preparing scouting reports. He won just three games in two seasons at Division II New Mexico Highlands, but did break a 24-game losing streak - the longest in the nation - early last year with a 41-24 win over Mesa State.
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By From Sun news services | November 17, 2008
Jim Fassel (right) has stepped up his campaign to become an NFL head coach again in the most interesting of ways. ESPN.com quoted a team source as saying that Fassel recently sent a handwritten letter to Oakland Raiders owner Al Davis, expressing his respect and admiration for Davis and his desire to coach the embattled franchise. Fassel last worked in the league as the Ravens' offensive coordinator, from 2003 until his dismissal midway through the 2006 season. He was head coach of the New York Giants from 1997 until the team fired him after the 2003 season.
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By JAMISON HENSLEY | October 19, 2006
The Ravens' firing of offensive coordinator Jim Fassel on Tuesday might have been a necessary move. But it also was an expensive one. Because it was a firing and not a resignation, the Ravens must pay Fassel $1 million for each of the next two seasons. His contract runs through the 2007 season. If Fassel receives another coaching job, the Ravens would owe him only the difference between his new salary and his existing contract. Unlike players' contracts, the ones signed by coaches are guaranteed.
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By RICK MAESE | November 29, 2006
The Man Who Is To Blame is still watching. And cheering. Let's get that out of the way right now. He'll tune in tomorrow night like everyone else - this blessed bunch that thinks purple dye is a perfectly normal hair-care product - to see whether the Ravens can become the first NFL team to clinch a division title this season. If that happens, we'll see some momentum starting to propel two very different ideas. The first: Another dominant showing will firmly establish the Ravens' place alongside the Colts as a Super Bowl favorite heading into the final month of the season.
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By MIKE PRESTON | August 31, 2006
Ravens offensive coordinator Jim Fassel didn't like the show Friday night in Minnesota. There were too many mental mistakes, turnovers and times when the Ravens simply got whipped physically. But Fassel is treating the 30-7 loss to the Vikings more as an aberration than the norm. Until that game, the Ravens' offense had shown progress. It had not scored as many points as Fassel would have liked, but it had moved the ball by establishing a running game and it kept often-injured quarterback Steve McNair protected.
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By MIKE PRESTON | May 18, 2004
THE RAVENS were only three minutes into passing camp yesterday, and there was little question about Jim Fassel's new job. He was quarterback Kyle Boller's shadow. Seldom were they apart for more than a few minutes without Fassel whispering in his ear or demonstrating technique. Occasionally, he scratched his head at some of Boller's passes, but he spent most of the morning being positive. Part II in the development of Boller began on the field yesterday with Fassel replacing offensive coordinator Matt Cavanaugh and receivers/quarterbacks coach David Shaw as Boller's tutor.
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By Jamison Hensley and Edward Lee and Jamison Hensley and Edward Lee,SUN REPORTERS | November 3, 2006
Two weeks after Jim Fassel was fired as the Ravens' offensive coordinator, his son John plans to remain with the team this season and beyond. John Fassel, a special teams assistant who is in his second season on the Ravens' coaching staff, said he spoke to coach Brian Billick immediately after his father's dismissal to clarify his situation. "I told him, `Coach, I hope this doesn't change anything between you and me because I'm going to be as loyal and committed to the Ravens as I ever have,' " John Fassel said.
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By MIKE PRESTON | January 21, 2006
As the NFL continues to fill its head coaching vacancies, the Ravens should be breathing a sigh of relief because it appears Jim Fassel will remain the offensive coordinator for a second straight season. Why should anyone be elated? Didn't the Ravens have one of the league's worst offenses last season? With Fassel's return, there is hope for improvement. During owner Steve Bisciotti's "Who's your Daddy?" speech to coach Brian Billick at the end of the season, he suggested that Billick had to turn more control of his offense over to Fassel.
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By MIKE PRESTON | August 3, 2006
What has become the most frequently asked question about the Ravens since they came to Baltimore 10 years ago has a definitive answer: Jim Fassel is calling the Ravens' offensive plays. Finally. It was mandated nearly eight months ago when owner Steve Bisciotti allowed Ravens head coach Brian Billick to return for the 2006 season, and has been on full display in training camp. The philosophies and principles basically remain the same, but it's Billick's show under Fassel's direction. In a strange arrangement a year ago, Fassel called the plays except for inside the opponent's 20-yard line, where Billick took over.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2006
Amid escalating frustrations from the players concerning the Ravens' offense, coach Brian Billick fired offensive coordinator Jim Fassel yesterday and took over play-calling duties for his struggling attack. Billick reached his decision late Monday afternoon after he spoke with Fassel about having an increased role in running the offense, a source within the organization said. When Fassel bristled at the idea -- he thought Billick had intervened enough already this season, a source added -- Billick chose to part ways with his longtime friend and end an ongoing power struggle over the offense.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun reporter | November 19, 2006
Brian Billick's endless attempts to reconnect with his players over the years have taken him from the Las Vegas strip to an IHOP restaurant in Oklahoma City. Yet it wasn't until three weeks ago in a cramped, dingy locker room in New Orleans that Billick truly felt he bonded with his team again. Falcons@Ravens Today, 1 p.m., Ch. 45, 1090 AM, 97.9 FM Line: Ravens by 4
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By Jamison Hensley and Edward Lee and Jamison Hensley and Edward Lee,SUN REPORTERS | November 3, 2006
Two weeks after Jim Fassel was fired as the Ravens' offensive coordinator, his son John plans to remain with the team this season and beyond. John Fassel, a special teams assistant who is in his second season on the Ravens' coaching staff, said he spoke to coach Brian Billick immediately after his father's dismissal to clarify his situation. "I told him, `Coach, I hope this doesn't change anything between you and me because I'm going to be as loyal and committed to the Ravens as I ever have,' " John Fassel said.
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By JAMISON HENSLEY | October 19, 2006
The Ravens' firing of offensive coordinator Jim Fassel on Tuesday might have been a necessary move. But it also was an expensive one. Because it was a firing and not a resignation, the Ravens must pay Fassel $1 million for each of the next two seasons. His contract runs through the 2007 season. If Fassel receives another coaching job, the Ravens would owe him only the difference between his new salary and his existing contract. Unlike players' contracts, the ones signed by coaches are guaranteed.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN REPORTER | October 18, 2006
Amid escalating frustrations from the players concerning the Ravens' offense, coach Brian Billick fired offensive coordinator Jim Fassel yesterday and took over play-calling duties for his struggling attack. Billick reached his decision late Monday afternoon after he spoke with Fassel about having an increased role in running the offense, a source within the organization said. When Fassel bristled at the idea -- he thought Billick had intervened enough already this season, a source added -- Billick chose to part ways with his longtime friend and end an ongoing power struggle over the offense.
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By RICK MAESE | October 18, 2006
The fallout will not make itself immediately known. At season's end, we'll know whether Brian Billick saved the Ravens with his decision to oust offensive coordinator Jim Fassel or if he simply signed his own walking papers. Either way, the pressure has clearly shifted. Billick would surely suggest that pressure is inherent in his position, but the truth is, the head coach shares it, delegating both responsibility and accountability to his assistants and coordinators. Over the past few weeks, as the Ravens have struggled offensively, there've been just two men flailing about in the Ravens' boiling pot. Billick tossed Fassel overboard yesterday, which leaves just one person to be held accountable when all is said and done.
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By MIKE PRESTON | August 31, 2006
Ravens offensive coordinator Jim Fassel didn't like the show Friday night in Minnesota. There were too many mental mistakes, turnovers and times when the Ravens simply got whipped physically. But Fassel is treating the 30-7 loss to the Vikings more as an aberration than the norm. Until that game, the Ravens' offense had shown progress. It had not scored as many points as Fassel would have liked, but it had moved the ball by establishing a running game and it kept often-injured quarterback Steve McNair protected.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | January 14, 2005
Jim Fassel is contemplating whether to become the Ravens' offensive coordinator, a source close to the situation said last night. The former New York Giants coach has shown interest in the job during discussions this week with Ravens coach Brian Billick, but there is no deadline for him to make a decision. If Fassel declines to take the position, the Ravens likely would offer it to former University of Washington coach Rick Neuheisel. Fassel, 55, served as an offensive consultant with the Ravens this season, primarily working just two days a week during the regular season.
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By Neil Best and Neil Best,NEWSDAY | January 18, 2001
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- Jim Fassel admitted he was a bit overwhelmed by the barrage of Super Bowl-related logistical matters he faced Monday and Tuesday. But now he has cleared his desk and hopes to focus only on football. Fassel's mantra this week has been "business as usual," and the team conducted a reasonably normal practice yesterday in the bubble outside Giants Stadium. The game plan will be installed before the team leaves for Tampa on Sunday, but Fassel will save short yardage and goal-line work for next week.
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By MIKE PRESTON | August 3, 2006
What has become the most frequently asked question about the Ravens since they came to Baltimore 10 years ago has a definitive answer: Jim Fassel is calling the Ravens' offensive plays. Finally. It was mandated nearly eight months ago when owner Steve Bisciotti allowed Ravens head coach Brian Billick to return for the 2006 season, and has been on full display in training camp. The philosophies and principles basically remain the same, but it's Billick's show under Fassel's direction. In a strange arrangement a year ago, Fassel called the plays except for inside the opponent's 20-yard line, where Billick took over.
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July 16, 2006
When you get a new job, your bosses might hand you one of those training guides for new employees, some type of orientation packet that's usually pretty easy to toss without ever actually opening. Steve McNair got something like that from his new employer - a thick binder packed with a few hundred pages. Unlike the handbook you or I might get, McNair has to memorize his completely, and he's working with a pretty tight deadline. In a quiet period when most of the NFL is focused on squeezing all it can out of the offseason, McNair has been cramming for a pretty big test, one that will last four months and is packed with pressure and expectations at every turn.
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