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By John-John Williams IV and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
When she returns to Baltimore, Zoey Washington walks the streets with relative anonymity. She'll pop into local boutiques unnoticed. This isn't the reception you would expect for a woman who founded a nationally recognized styling collective, LittleBird, focused on the teen and tween demographic, and who has held editing positions with some of the world's best-known glossies. Washington, a 31-year-old graduate of Garrison Forest School and Columbia University, prefers it that way. But Washington's resume reads like a who's who of fashion elite: She's held positions at Marie Claire, Vogue and Essence.
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By John-John Williams IV and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
When she returns to Baltimore, Zoey Washington walks the streets with relative anonymity. She'll pop into local boutiques unnoticed. This isn't the reception you would expect for a woman who founded a nationally recognized styling collective, LittleBird, focused on the teen and tween demographic, and who has held editing positions with some of the world's best-known glossies. Washington, a 31-year-old graduate of Garrison Forest School and Columbia University, prefers it that way. But Washington's resume reads like a who's who of fashion elite: She's held positions at Marie Claire, Vogue and Essence.
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FEATURES
April 28, 1994
The Sun's fashion coverage was honored at the Atrium Awards, for excellence in reporting on the American garment industry. Sponsored by The University of Georgia College of Journalism and Mass Communication and the Atlanta Apparel rTC Mart, the 14th annual awards were presented in Atlanta last Sunday.Sun Fashion Editor Vida Roberts won in the features category for her story "Men in Skirts." Judges noted that although fringe trends touch few readers, good reporting puts fads into perspective for the mainstream and quoted from Ms. Roberts' story: "Men in skirts may sound frightening to the man whose wildest fashion statement to date has been a pair of patterned socks.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 12, 2014
In an essay for the New York Times, retiring fashion editor Cathy Horyn, a powerful commentator on the industry for 15 years, wrote in praise of "practical dressing. " She began by saying that she is freshening two bedrooms in her upstate New York house but is going to paint them exactly the same colors - light green and "ballroom blue" - rather than drive herself crazy with too many choices. This decision, she said, "sums up everything I feel about style and comfort. Or should I say the revenge of comfort over style.
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1998
Vida Roberts, The Sun's fashion editor whose enduring sartorial advice was that black works every time, died yesterday of cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. She was 56 and lived in Bolton Hill.A woman of striking features with silver hair and Lauren Bacall-like voice, Ms. Roberts wrote with wit and grace.In a 1995 profile of designer Isaac Mizrahi, Ms. Roberts wrote, "He's the fashion designer who punches sequins from Coke and Seven-Up cans and recycles them into glamour. He's the designer Roseanne doesn't keep waiting.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 12, 2014
In an essay for the New York Times, retiring fashion editor Cathy Horyn, a powerful commentator on the industry for 15 years, wrote in praise of "practical dressing. " She began by saying that she is freshening two bedrooms in her upstate New York house but is going to paint them exactly the same colors - light green and "ballroom blue" - rather than drive herself crazy with too many choices. This decision, she said, "sums up everything I feel about style and comfort. Or should I say the revenge of comfort over style.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | January 12, 2007
Dorothea T. Apgar, who wrote about fashion for the News American and was a Hearst newspapers correspondent, died of stroke complications Jan. 4 at Roland Park Place. The former Rodgers Forge resident was 90. Born Dorothea Tipper in New York City, she studied at Parsons School of Design, Fashion Institute of Technology and New York University, and was a management trainee for the old B. Altman department store. She began newspaper work covering weddings for the Ridgewood, N.J., Herald-News.
FEATURES
By Sun staff | June 5, 1999
The spirit of Vida Roberts, The Sun's former fashion editor, will be remembered and celebrated today during a free performance at Galerie Francoise et ses freres in Green Spring Station. Mary Jo Gordon, who met Roberts in the summer of 1997, said she wanted to offer a tribute that would capture Roberts' spirit. "You could meet her once and she affected you," says Gordon. "She made no distinction by economics. She loved people across the board." The memorial tribute features sculptor and performance artist Elisa Jimenez, as well as Darryl Harper, clarinetist and head of the art department for the St. Paul's schools.
NEWS
May 12, 1995
Don Marshall, 79, a milliner whose creations were worn by many of society's most fashionable women, died Saturday of a brain tumor at his home in New York City. He made toques for Estee Lauder, turbans for Rosalind Russell, broad brims for Joan Crawford and veiled caplets for the Duchess of Windsor. His designs were worn by Rose Kennedy, Irene Worth and Nancy Kissinger, among others. The hat Grace Kelly wore at her wedding to Prince Rainier of Monaco was one of his designs. It is now part of the permanent collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art.Ermina Stimson, 93, an illustrator, art director and fashion editor during 36 years with Women's Wear Daily, died Tuesday at her home in Wellfleet, Mass.
FEATURES
By Vida Roberts and Vida Roberts,Staff Writer | June 2, 1993
The good guys of "Posse" wear some bad threads -- and Mario Van Peebles wears the baddest. The star-director of the new black Western, which has filmgoers lined up at the box office, may be the cowboy with just the right attitude to turn a different generation of dudes on to Western-wear.Julia Chance, fashion editor of The Source, the magazine of hip-hop music, culture and politics, sees it happening with a distinctive city-slicker twist. "We of the African-American community have a way of embellishing fashion and making it our own. We'll see Western, but not as a complete look."
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2013
Here's what the new Baltimore Style magazine looks like. "It's got a new logo, a fresh design - and Katie O'Malley on the cover," editor-in-chief Joe Sugarman said in an email to The Sun. "Our fashion editor, Suzin Boddiford, somehow convinced the first lady to model the latest spring fashions in a 10-page fashion shoot. We've got an interview with her in there, too. I have to say, she looks like a real model. People will be stunned. " #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; }
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2012
Katharine S. Lenfestey, a homemaker and avid gardener, died Feb. 6 from complications of a stroke at Keswick Multi-Care Center. The former Cedarcroft resident was 96. The former Katharine Schlemm was born in Brookline, Mass., and after the death of her parents, was raised by relatives in Duxbury, Mass. After earning a bachelor's degree in 1936 from Wheaton College in Norton, Mass., she studied in Germany. "She was an early feminist and adventurer. Her flying lessons were cut short by the onset of World War II," said her daughter, Marion W. Bernard, who lives in Waterville, Ohio.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2010
Yes, it's real. And no, Stacy London is not getting rid of her signature gray streak of hair. She tried to do it once before, with disastrous results. London, co-host of the TLC series "What Not to Wear," is inundated with questions about the origins of her premature silver strands almost as much as inquiries from the fashionably challenged seeking couture counseling. When the former fashion editor of Vogue comes to Annapolis this weekend for the Westfield Style Tour, an event that features private consultations with professional stylists, including London, and discounted shopping, the raven-haired fashionista hopes to field questions that will lead to an end of common wardrobe missteps that many women make.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2010
Lilac, magenta, eggplant, aubergine, mulberry, blackberry, and purpley-pink. This fall, purple reigns supreme among the fashion elite. Yves Saint Laurent, Donna Karan, Phillip Lim, Alexander McQueen, Badley Mischa, and Robert Graham all released designs of the purple hue for their fall lines. The trend will continue into the later months as designers this week at the Mercedes Benz New York Fashion Week also showcased purple pieces. In Baltimore, a city that bleeds purple because of its connection to its NFL football team, it seems like a perfect excuse to play dress up at games.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,Sun reporter | April 12, 2008
John M. "Jack" Lemmon, a veteran newspaperman who was the managing editor of The Evening Sun from 1979 to 1991, died of a heart attack yesterday morning at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The longtime Towson resident was 80. Mr. Lemmon, whose newspaper career spanned four decades, was born and raised in Mount Pleasant, Ill., the son of a businessman who admired H.L. Mencken and introduced his young son to the famed Baltimore newspaperman's journalism. After stints as a journalism professor and editing jobs at The Washington Star and The Washington Post, Mr. Lemmon was hired to run The Evening Sun, where decades earlier Mr. Mencken had earned his fame as a reporter and columnist.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN REPORTER | January 12, 2007
Dorothea T. Apgar, who wrote about fashion for the News American and was a Hearst newspapers correspondent, died of stroke complications Jan. 4 at Roland Park Place. The former Rodgers Forge resident was 90. Born Dorothea Tipper in New York City, she studied at Parsons School of Design, Fashion Institute of Technology and New York University, and was a management trainee for the old B. Altman department store. She began newspaper work covering weddings for the Ridgewood, N.J., Herald-News.
FEATURES
By Kim Traverso | October 4, 1991
When Harriette Cole attended Western High, she knew what she wanted to do -- be a writer or involved in fashion. She managed to do both.Twelve years later, the former model and now fashion editor of Essence was back at her alma mater last Friday sharing her life and experiences with the students.She found the experience humbling and gratifying. "It was nice to be appreciated and have a place to share my successes," says Ms. Cole, 30.She told the all-girl student body about growing up in Forest Park, where her parents still live, and her high-profile job at the leading lifestyle magazine for black women.
FEATURES
October 30, 1994
Trazana BeverleyActressClass of 1963Ms. Beverley won a Tony Award in 1976 for her performance in "For Colored Girls Who Have Considered Suicide/When the Rainbow is Enuf."Early this month, she portrayed a tough-minded settler in a 19th-century Kansas town in "Flyin' West," at Washington's Kennedy Center.She has taught drama classes at New York University, Morgan State University and the Baltimore School for the Arts.Beverly (Grodnitzky) BurnsPilot, Continental AirlinesClass of 1967Western taught students by example, Mrs. Burns says.
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | February 9, 2006
NEW YORK -- Runway shows at Fashion Week might just be the last place on Earth where discrimination is not only permitted, it is actually encouraged. Here - under the bright lights and amid the air kisses - it is clear who is important and who is not, simply by checking the Who's Who of the fashion world: the seating chart. Seating snafus have tested friendships. Fisticuffs have reportedly ensued. "If your name isn't Phillip Bloch, why are you sitting in my seat?" asks Bloch, renowned celebrity stylist and no-nonsense supporter of the seating hierarchy.
FEATURES
By TANIKA WHITE and TANIKA WHITE,SUN REPORTER | December 5, 2005
It's like Cosmo in 3-D and InStyle coming to life in your living room. Watching award-winning fashion designer Isaac Mizrahi's new talk show - debuting tonight at 7 on the Style Network - is like watching your favorite fashion magazine unfold on television. Those great round-toe shoes you've been looking for? See them on screen - on a real, live fashionista - and get Isaac's opinion about them, too. That burning style question you wanted to write and ask a fashion editor? Isaac answers it right there in his design studio - on camera and off-the-cuff.
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