Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFascism
IN THE NEWS

Fascism

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | August 29, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- Are we "at war with Islamic fascists"? That's what President Bush said right after British police broke up a plot to blow up aircraft crossing the Atlantic. The term "Islamo-fascism" is being used with increasing frequency in the blogosphere and in conservative journals as an all-purpose label for extremist Muslims. The label provides a rallying cry for those who want to cast themselves in the mantle of Winston Churchill fighting World War II. But does raising the specter of Islamic fascists aid the antiterrorist struggle?
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | November 15, 2013
Another Veterans Day has come and gone, celebrating the millions of Americans who served in the so-called War to End All Wars and all the wars since. The day was originally observed as Armistice Day, commemorating the all-quiet on the Western Front in France in November 1918. American troops had been involved there for barely more than a year and a half, and in actual combat in the trenches for only about eight months. The popular song kicking off the U.S. entry boasted, "We'll be over, we're coming over, and we won't come back till it's over, over there.
Advertisement
NEWS
August 17, 1993
THE people who thought up the name Rhinos for a possible National Football League team in Baltimore didn't know, forgot or didn't care about Eugene Ionesco.He's the Romania-born playwright who in 1958 wrote a play, "Rhinoceros," about people who turn into rhinoceroses that blindly follow the leader except for only one individualist.Told with humor and weird characters, the play is a metaphorical attack at fascism and how people yield to its terrors by becoming rhinos.When the play became a movie in 1974, Zero Mostel, right, played John, who humorously turns into a pachyderm before the audience's eyes.
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 25, 2013
"If history were to repeat itself," warned President Franklin D. Roosevelt in his 1944 State of the Union address, "and we were to return to the so-called normalcy of the 1920s, then it is certain that even though we shall have conquered our enemies on the battlefields abroad, we shall have yielded to the spirit of fascism here at home. " The "normalcy" of the 1920s that Roosevelt referred to was a time of peace and prosperity. The decade began with Republican President Warren Harding commuting the sentences of political prisoners jailed by the Wilson administration, including the socialist leader Eugene Debs.
NEWS
February 2, 2012
I want to congratulate The Baltimore Sun on its steady capitulation to the paranoid conservative segment of our population - the righties who accuse any publication or broadcast of liberal bias simply because they allow a cross-section of viewpoints. The latest in this surrender to the right is the bringing on-board of former Maryland Gov.Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.as a columnist ("Ehrlich and The Sun: Once enemies, now partners," Jan. 29). Wouldn't it seem more fitting to replace the late Ron Smith with someone from the center instead of the right, another libertarian, perhaps?
NEWS
June 6, 1994
NORMAN Davies, writing in the New York Review of Books, has this to say about commemorations of D-Day:"Nineteen ninety-four, the fiftieth anniversary of the D-Day landings, has spawned a festival of what A. J. P. Taylor once called 'the Nuremberg Consensus.' Taylor was pointing to the fact that the history of World War II had largely been written by the victors, and that the moral and political assumptions of the victorious Allies had been largely left unchallenged. And he was right. Fifty years after the main fighting stopped, most British and Americans still imagine the war as defined by the aims of the Grand Alliance.
FEATURES
By Monica Crowley and Monica Crowley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 8, 1998
"Mussolini," by Jasper Ridley. St. Martin's Press. 448 pages. $27.50. Shortly after he assumed power in Italy in 1922, Benito Mussolini invented the word "totalitarian" to describe the state under his fascist government. Mussolini intended it to have a positive connotation: the totalitarian state demanded total commitment and devotion of all its citizens who would, in turn, reap the benefits of a strong regime.Inescapably, however, it also meant the supremacy of the state, the use of brutal force as the means of exacting social obedience, and an unquenchable thirst for policies of conquest, oppression and annihilation.
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2002
PREDAPPIO, Italy - It began quietly, without warning. One morning, three young skinheads on a secret mission entered the crypt, donned black capes and took turns standing at grim attention by their hero's tomb. The next day, another stone-faced trio took up the 11-hour watch; and before many people noticed, the stealth vigil had become a daily routine. Today, nearly a year later, the ritual is an established fact: Benito Mussolini, the long-disgraced Fascist dictator, has a posthumous honor guard.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | August 11, 2009
If you're wondering what the ugly, pinched face of America looks like, just turn on the television, open a newspaper or fire up your laptop. Public mayhem, scare-mongering, and even a warning from the 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee about a fictitious "death panel" are, apparently, what constitutes thoughtful discourse about health care coming from the darker corners of American conservatism. And naturally, any serious national conversation on a major policy issue must begin with a thorough discussion ... of the president's birth certificate.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | November 28, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas -- Readin' the newspapers is eerily reminiscent of all those bad novels warning of the advent of fascism in America. It Can't Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis was a bad book, and the genre shades off into right-wing paranoia about black helicopters, including the memorably awful Turner Diaries. I don't use the F-word myself -- in fact, for years, I've made fun of liberals who hear the approach of jackbooted fascism around every corner. But to quote a real authority on the subject, "Fascism should more properly be called corporatism, since it is the merger of state and corporate power."
NEWS
February 2, 2012
I want to congratulate The Baltimore Sun on its steady capitulation to the paranoid conservative segment of our population - the righties who accuse any publication or broadcast of liberal bias simply because they allow a cross-section of viewpoints. The latest in this surrender to the right is the bringing on-board of former Maryland Gov.Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.as a columnist ("Ehrlich and The Sun: Once enemies, now partners," Jan. 29). Wouldn't it seem more fitting to replace the late Ron Smith with someone from the center instead of the right, another libertarian, perhaps?
NEWS
December 5, 2011
In 2008, I wrote a book called "Liberal Fascism. " That title came from H.G. Wells, one of the most important socialist writers in the English language. He believed, as did his fellow Fabian socialists, that Western democratic capitalism had outlived its usefulness. What was needed was a new, bold, forward-thinking system run by experts with access to the most modern techniques. For Wells, the label for such a system mattered less than the imperative that we implement a revolution-from-above.
NEWS
By Thomas F. Schaller | August 11, 2009
If you're wondering what the ugly, pinched face of America looks like, just turn on the television, open a newspaper or fire up your laptop. Public mayhem, scare-mongering, and even a warning from the 2008 Republican vice presidential nominee about a fictitious "death panel" are, apparently, what constitutes thoughtful discourse about health care coming from the darker corners of American conservatism. And naturally, any serious national conversation on a major policy issue must begin with a thorough discussion ... of the president's birth certificate.
NEWS
By Victor Davis Hanson | October 20, 2006
Why do Republicans drive leftists so crazy these days? Liberal Democrats are beginning to sound like rowdy students on spring break, shrieking and exhibiting themselves on camera. Consider some of the recent rabid outbursts by once sober, old-guard politicians. West Virginia Sen. John D. Rockefeller IV insists that the world would be better off if Saddam Hussein were still running Iraq. Rep. John P. Murtha of Pennsylvania rushed to announce that our Marines were guilty of killing Iraqis in "cold blood" before they were tried.
NEWS
By Victor Davis Hanson | September 8, 2006
President Bush recently declared that we are at war with "Islamic fascism." Muslim-American groups were quick to express furor at the expression. Middle Eastern autocracies complained that it was provocative and insensitive. Critics of the term chosen by the president, however, should remember what al-Qaida, the Taliban, Hezbollah, Hamas and other extremist Muslim groups have said and done. Like the fascists of the 1930s, the leaders of these groups are authoritarians who brook no dissent in their efforts to impose a comprehensive system of submission upon the unwilling.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | August 29, 2006
PHILADELPHIA -- Are we "at war with Islamic fascists"? That's what President Bush said right after British police broke up a plot to blow up aircraft crossing the Atlantic. The term "Islamo-fascism" is being used with increasing frequency in the blogosphere and in conservative journals as an all-purpose label for extremist Muslims. The label provides a rallying cry for those who want to cast themselves in the mantle of Winston Churchill fighting World War II. But does raising the specter of Islamic fascists aid the antiterrorist struggle?
NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | April 25, 2013
"If history were to repeat itself," warned President Franklin D. Roosevelt in his 1944 State of the Union address, "and we were to return to the so-called normalcy of the 1920s, then it is certain that even though we shall have conquered our enemies on the battlefields abroad, we shall have yielded to the spirit of fascism here at home. " The "normalcy" of the 1920s that Roosevelt referred to was a time of peace and prosperity. The decade began with Republican President Warren Harding commuting the sentences of political prisoners jailed by the Wilson administration, including the socialist leader Eugene Debs.
NEWS
By GWYNNE DYER | November 9, 1991
London -- Even now, while the corpse is still warm and the family of the deceased are stumbling around with dazed looks on their faces, it's time to talk about the real meaning of what has just happened. Because it may be more than the collapse of ''totalitarianism;'' it may be the end of utopias.The communist experiment is over (despite a few hold-outs that haven't got the news yet), and it has been an unmitigated failure. Seventy years of theory and plotting, and another 70 years in which the theory was ruthlessly put into practice, have just gurgled down the drain.
NEWS
By Molly Ivins | November 28, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas -- Readin' the newspapers is eerily reminiscent of all those bad novels warning of the advent of fascism in America. It Can't Happen Here by Sinclair Lewis was a bad book, and the genre shades off into right-wing paranoia about black helicopters, including the memorably awful Turner Diaries. I don't use the F-word myself -- in fact, for years, I've made fun of liberals who hear the approach of jackbooted fascism around every corner. But to quote a real authority on the subject, "Fascism should more properly be called corporatism, since it is the merger of state and corporate power."
NEWS
By Richard Boudreaux and Richard Boudreaux,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 1, 2002
PREDAPPIO, Italy - It began quietly, without warning. One morning, three young skinheads on a secret mission entered the crypt, donned black capes and took turns standing at grim attention by their hero's tomb. The next day, another stone-faced trio took up the 11-hour watch; and before many people noticed, the stealth vigil had become a daily routine. Today, nearly a year later, the ritual is an established fact: Benito Mussolini, the long-disgraced Fascist dictator, has a posthumous honor guard.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.