Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFarrakhan
IN THE NEWS

Farrakhan

NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | March 2, 2007
His speech in Detroit last weekend was billed as his last major public address, but associates of Minister Louis Farrakhan won't say the ailing Nation of Islam leader is retiring. I understand their disbelief. Mr. Farrakhan has been written off before, yet managed to stage enough encores to rival the late James Brown. Nevertheless, this time I take him at his word. "My time is up," he declared. "The Final Call can't last forever." I thought Mr. Farrakhan's time was up in 1975 after the Honorable Elijah Muhammad, the Nation of Islam's co-founding leader, died.
Advertisement
NEWS
By MICHAEL LERNER | June 8, 1994
New York -- When Louis Farrakhan participates in the ''National Leadership Conference'' of the NAACP in Baltimore Sunday afternoon, many Jews and others sensitive to anti-Semitism will be demonstrating outside.Mr. Farrakhan's anti-Semitism and homophobia are well documented. They are not matters of the distant past when he was talking about Judaism as a ''gutter religion.'' Although he flirted briefly with lowering his anti-Semitic profile, and tried to dissociate from the worst excesses of his lieutenant Khallid Abdul Muhammad, in a recent TV call-in show in California he reverted his old hateful ways, suggesting that the Jews had set up the Federal Reserve and retained control over its money.
NEWS
By James Bock and James Bock,Sun Staff Writer | June 13, 1994
Black leaders vowed yesterday to rise above their philosophical differences to help their people, as a national summit opened under heavy security at NAACP headquarters in Northwest Baltimore."
NEWS
By Peter A. Jay | October 19, 1995
HAVRE DE GRACE -- A week ago, in the midst of the din that arose upon O. J. Simpson's acquittal, I wrote that while the verdict was certainly a blow to race relations in the United States, it wasn't the apocalyptic moment it seemed to some. Good sense on both sides would eventually prevail, I said.The piece seemed to astound some readers. One whose judgment I usually consider reliable politely called me an ostrich. If I couldn't see that the racial divide in our country was now just about unbridgeable, he suggested, I must have my head wedged.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers | January 27, 1994
I WONDER if Nation of Islam spokesman Khalid Abdul Muhammad has seen the movie "Schindler's List" or visited the National Holocaust Museum in Washington.My guess would be that even if he had, it would not change his racist beliefs. Recently, during a speech at New Jersey's Kean College, Mr. Muhammad blamed European Jews for the Holocaust because "they went in there to Germany, the way they do everywhere they go, and they supplanted, they usurped. . ." His speech reportedly elicited applause and cheers from the audience of faculty and students.
NEWS
By Andrew M. Greeley | October 26, 1995
THE AFRICAN-AMERICAN varieties of Islam play a role in the black community that's not unlike that which the nationality parishes played for Catholic immigrants early in this century.They provide a sheltered environment with strong community support in which members can acculturate into the ways of middle-class American life while protected from the negative effects of racism and the unstable elements in their own community.In one of the first studies of the so-called ''Black Muslims,'' T. Eric Lincoln emphasized this role of creating sober, responsible, respectable middle-class norms in a protected environment for blacks who wanted to break out of the street culture.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | June 30, 1994
Havre de Grace -- Unscrambling the torrent of confused messages emanating from the movement led by Louis Farrakhan isn't easy, but in the wake of his visit to Baltimore the effort needs to be made, and some hard distinctions need to be drawn.Like most charismatic leaders of mass movements, Mr. Farrakhan is a deliberate and intelligent polarizer. He draws his strength from division, not from unity. The fervor of his followers, those within the tent, is reinforced by the hostility displayed toward him by those without.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 29, 1998
Some 33 years after he was dragged unwillingly into infamy, Norman 3X Butler is in the news again.Butler is now known as Muhammad Abdul-Aziz. On Feb. 25, 1965, police arrested him at his home and charged him with being one of the three men who had, four days earlier, shot and killed Malcolm X in Harlem's Audubon Ballroom. Abdul-Aziz was convicted, sentenced to life in prison and paroled in 1985.Abdul-Aziz is a member of the Nation of Islam. Minister Louis Farrakhan recently appointed Abdul-Aziz the Fruit of Islam captain of the Nation of Islam's Harlem mosque.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | April 30, 1993
Washington. -- Most people probably don't know it but, long before Black Muslim Minister Louis Farrakhan began to make news for baiting Jews, he was a popular professional calypso performer known as ''the Charmer.''Before that, he was a child violinist who performed impressively on the ''Ted Mack Amateur Hour'' in 1946 when he was only about 13.Now the controversial Nation of Islam head says he hopes his music will have enough charm to smooth relations between blacks and Jews.Surrounded by his bodyguards, he surprised the audience after an April 17 orchestral concert in Winston-Salem, North Carolina, by walking onstage and playing the Mendelssohn Violin Concerto.
NEWS
By Clarence Page | June 25, 1996
WASHINGTON -- The challenge came from Nation of Islam Minister Louis Farrakhan, and it has been answered.The challenge came back in March at the end of a press conference in Washington, where Mr. Farrakhan was presented with an award by the black-oriented National Newspaper Publishers Association.He was on his way out the door after answering questions about his earlier Africa tour, which included visits to Libya, Sudan and other countries opposed to the U.S. when someone shouted a question to him about slavery in Sudan.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.