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By Susan Baer and Susan Baer,Washington Bureau of The Sun | February 5, 1994
WASHINGTON -- After a week of silence over the crumbling relationship between the Nation of Islam and the nation's African-American leaders, the NAACP yesterday said it was satisfied with black Muslim leader Louis T. Farrakhan's condemnation of an aide Thursday and believes that the controversial leader is neither anti-Semitic nor racist.The nation's leading civil rights organization issued the written statement a day after Mr. Farrakhan's provocative news conference, in which he said he was disciplining his aide, Khalid Abdul Muhammad, for the "repugnant, malicious" manner in which he spoke against Jews, Catholics and whites, but stood by the "truths" of his speech.
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NEWS
By Peter Nicholas and Peter Nicholas,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 29, 2008
WASHINGTON -- At a moment when Sen. Barack Obama is struggling to win over white voters worried about the economy, a series of public appearances by his former pastor is threatening to revive a tempest over race, patriotism and religion that the Democratic front-runner hoped he had quashed. The Rev. Jeremiah A. Wright Jr. appeared at the National Press Club yesterday, delivering a defiant address in which he defended and amplified some politically- and racially-charged remarks from past sermons.
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NEWS
By Stephen Wigler | April 22, 1993
I was fascinated to read earlier this week that Louis Farrakhan loves the music of Mendelssohn and that his performance of that composer's Violin Concerto in Winston-Salem, N.C., last weekend shows, in his words, "that I am not anti-Semitic."Mr. Farrakhan, the spiritual leader of the Nation of Islam, has for years said things that have been hurtful to Jews and that have troubled their relations with African-Americans. Some of those remarks -- for example, that Judaism is a "gutter religion" and that the founders of Israel are "criminals in the sight of God" -- are already golden oldies in the history of hate.
NEWS
By Erin Aubry Kaplan | March 20, 2008
I'm mad. Let me qualify that - I'm black and mad. The mad I'm talking about I inherited from generations of black people before me. I learned early in life that this mad is not curable (not yet) but that I could manage it. But sometimes I get flare-ups of anger that defy management. I've been having such moments as Sen. Barack Obama has publicly rebuked remarks made by his longtime pastor, the Rev. Jeremiah Wright. Pastor Wright has been vilified for excerpts of sermons in which he's said some fairly outlandish things (for example, that "we" - America - started AIDS)
NEWS
By Harold Jackson and Harold Jackson,sun staff | August 3, 1997
"Looking for Farrakhan," by Florence Hamlish Levinsohn. Ivan R. Dee. 305 pages. $25. We've all had the experience. You go to a nice restaurant. Scrutinize the menu for something exceptional. The waiter brings it out. You take a bite. And your face falls in disappointment.Such is the case with "Looking for Farrakhan" by Florence Hamlish Levinsohn. Seeking an interview, she never got past minions of Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan. Lacking the ingredient should have stopped her from writing this particular book in the way she wrote it, but it didn't.
NEWS
By ARTHUR J. MAGIDA | October 11, 1995
DON'T EXPECT to see Louis Farrakhan wear a yarmulke at the Million Man March he's organizing in Washington next Monday. But there's still the slightest chance he'll put one on, a bright white one. I know. I gave him that yarmulke during dinner at his home in Chicago in mid-June.I met with Mr. Farrakhan because I'm writing a biography of him. During the meal -- and I must say he is a fine and gracious host -- he brought up the march: One million men dedicated to reforming themselves. To making amends for their trespasses.
NEWS
By GLENN McNATT | February 5, 1994
Minister Louis Farrakhan of the Nation of Islam almost turned the tables on his tormentors Thursday when he appeared at a ''press conference'' in Washington packed with his supporters to denounce the ''Jewish conspiracy'' to destroy his movement. It was a performance worthy of the original Wile E. Coyote.Mr. Farrakhan's appearance was prompted by criticism from the Congressional Black Caucus Chairman Kweisi Mfume, NAACP Director Benjamin Chavis, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, United Negro College Fund President William Gray and others regarding a virulently anti-Semitic speech delivered by one of Mr. Farrakhan's aides last November at Kean College in New Jersey.
NEWS
January 28, 1994
When the Black Caucus, the NAACP and the Rev. Jesse Jackson extended a hand of reconciliation to Nation of Islam Minister Louis Farrakhan in the name of black unity last year, we predicted the honeymoon was apt to be short. Now it appears a parting of the ways may be imminent.Last weekend, Mr. Jackson called on Mr. Farrakhan to repudiate remarks made in November at New Jersey's Kean College by Khalid Abdul Muhammad, one of Mr. Farrakhan's principal aides.Mr. Muhammad reportedly told his audience that Jews "own the Federal Reserve," control the White House "from behind the scenes," and have names like Rubenstein, Goldstein and Silverstein because they have been "stealing rubies and gold and silver all over the earth."
NEWS
By Michael Kelly | April 18, 1997
WASHINGTON -- Nuts is not the same as stupid. Louis Farrakhan is a smart man, and he knows a good deal about the world in which he wishes to play a conspicuous part. He knows that politicians are greedy for any support they can get. He knows that journalists are easy to gull and to bully.He knows that many white people regard black people with fear and guilt, and will go to great lengths to avoid conflict with them. He knows that many white people also regard black people as their mental inferiors, and are therefore willing to be impressed .. by an intellectual performance from a black person that they would not find impressive from a white person.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 20, 1997
After parking on the Palladium catering hall lot Friday evening, I slipped on my tie and sports jacket. I bought a copy of the Final Call from a kid who couldn't have been more than 10 and then headed indoors.In about another hour Louis Farrakhan, the leader of the Nation dTC of Islam, would be at this Baltimore hall to give a speech. What was an ornery, Farrakhan-bashing columnist doing in a place like this? And what was up with these Nation of Islam members, greeting me politely and calling me by name, as if they were glad to see me?
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Sun reporter | February 27, 2008
Barack Obama fended off renewed attacks from Hillary Clinton over campaign tactics, health care and trade last night, but their third and possibly last head-to-head debate ended on a harmonious note. The 90-minute faceoff did not appear to deliver a turnaround moment for Clinton, who is losing the contest for delegates and could be pushed from the race if she loses Texas and Ohio on Tuesday. Clinton said near the outset that she intended to "stand up" for herself when Obama distorts her positions and at another point declared that "it takes a fighter" to bring about change in Washington.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | March 2, 2007
His speech in Detroit last weekend was billed as his last major public address, but associates of Minister Louis Farrakhan won't say the ailing Nation of Islam leader is retiring. I understand their disbelief. Mr. Farrakhan has been written off before, yet managed to stage enough encores to rival the late James Brown. Nevertheless, this time I take him at his word. "My time is up," he declared. "The Final Call can't last forever." I thought Mr. Farrakhan's time was up in 1975 after the Honorable Elijah Muhammad, the Nation of Islam's co-founding leader, died.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | September 7, 2005
MINISTER Jamil Muhammad, the national spokesman for the Nation of Islam, pointed last Friday night to Minister Farajii Muhammad as a prime example of what their leader, Minister Louis Farrakhan, is trying to accomplish. "He's the youth minister for Mosque Six," said Jamil Muhammad, who at one time was the minister in charge of that mosque, which sits on Garrison Boulevard near Liberty Heights Avenue. Farajii Muhammad is 26 years old. He wore a bow tie, a sharp dark suit and a white shirt.
NEWS
May 22, 2005
On May 16, 2005, ARNITA ELIZABETH SHORTER, loving mother of Jacob M. Farrakhan and Shirley M. Jones. Also survived by 13 grandchildren, 28 greatgrandchildren, 13 great-great grandchildren and a host of other relatives and friends. Visitation at 2140 N. Fulton Ave. on Sunday 10 am to 6 pm. The family will receive friends at Ebenezer A.M.E. Church, 20 W. Montgomery St., on Monday at 11 AM. Funeral at 12 PM.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 9, 2003
DALLAS - Those at the National Association of Black Journalists who stood and gave National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice a standing ovation Thursday were few and far between in the Landmark Ballroom of this city's downtown Hyatt Regency Hotel. Rice strode into the ballroom after Gwen Ifill of PBS introduced her. There were no boos, catcalls or jeers as the audience applauded, but there wasn't the thunderous, almost unanimous standing ovation given another NABJ speaker seven years ago. It was in 1996 that Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan spoke at the NABJ convention in Nashville, Tenn.
NEWS
By Teresa Watanabe and Teresa Watanabe,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2002
LOS ANGELES - Islam's two pre-eminent African-American leaders, separated by two decades of rivalry before reconciling two years ago, reaffirmed unity Friday in their first joint appearance in Los Angeles. Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan and W.D. Muhammad of the Muslim American Society offered stark contrasts - one a fiery orator of political polemics and black empowerment, the other a low-key leader who resolutely sticks to religion. Once united under Nation founder Elijah Muhammad, they split 25 years ago over doctrine, with W.D. Muhammad rejecting his father's blend of Islam and black nationalism and moving into orthodox Sunni Islam.
NEWS
By Gregory Kane | October 18, 2000
SO THERE WAS one Louis Farrakhan, the Nation of Islam leader, standing on a podium in front of the U.S. Capitol on Monday, delivering the keynote address at the Million Family March his sect had organized. It was the fifth anniversary of the Million Man March, when more than 1 million black men - depending on whose estimate you believe - gathered in the nation's capital. Atonement was the theme then. On Monday, atonement, family, ecumenicalism and brotherhood were the themes. The Nation of Islam leader mentioned all four frequently in his three-hour peroration.
NEWS
By Del Quentin Wilber and Del Quentin Wilber,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | October 17, 2000
WASHINGTON - Hundreds of thousands of men, women and children gathered at the National Mall yesterday to celebrate family unity and racial and religious harmony in a Million Family March organized by Louis Farrakhan, leader of the Nation of Islam. Spread from the U.S. Capitol to the Lincoln Memorial, families listened as Farrakhan delivered a rambling three-hour speech that touched on a variety of issues but mostly sounded a theme of the importance of family. "The family is the basic unit of civilization," Farrakhan told the crowd.
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