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By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | June 10, 1997
Farming the land has been an American dream since before the first Thanksgiving.But it is becoming increasingly difficult -- nearly impossible -- for a new generation to earn its living on the farm."
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NEWS
By Thomas Firey | May 15, 2009
Some argue that Maryland government should intervene further in state horse racing, perhaps by providing regular subsidies, buying tracks and controlling races. I suggest an alternative: Do nothing. I say this not because I don't value the environmental impact of horse farms or the tracks' economic benefits. Rather, Maryland horse farms face little threat from racing's decline, and a horse racing industry that needs ongoing government support offers little economic benefit. There are more than 3,000 horse farms in Maryland.
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NEWS
By Thomas Firey | May 15, 2009
Some argue that Maryland government should intervene further in state horse racing, perhaps by providing regular subsidies, buying tracks and controlling races. I suggest an alternative: Do nothing. I say this not because I don't value the environmental impact of horse farms or the tracks' economic benefits. Rather, Maryland horse farms face little threat from racing's decline, and a horse racing industry that needs ongoing government support offers little economic benefit. There are more than 3,000 horse farms in Maryland.
NEWS
By Mike Tidwell | December 26, 2007
With ominous global warming accelerating year after year, why can't Maryland construct a single clean-energy wind farm within its borders? Gov. Martin O'Malley's blue-ribbon commission says we must get off fossil fuel very soon. But our state - one of the most vulnerable in America to global warming and one of the most politically liberal - can't achieve even the baby step of a single commercial wind farm. What's the problem? West Virginia has dozens of wind turbines; Pennsylvania even more.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | October 29, 2006
With their shiny black and red shells, harlequin beetles look a lot like ladybugs, but when Beckie Gurley sees them on the leaves of the broccoli she's growing at Calvert's Gift Farm, she quickly smashes them between her fingers. Because Calvert's Gift is an organic farm, she and her husband, Jack, don't use any pesticides to keep creatures like the beetles at bay. They just pick them off with their hands, one at a time. The 5-acre parcel, nestled in rolling countryside in Sparks, produces heirloom tomatoes with mouthwatering names - Brandywine, Persimmon and Pineapple - as well as radishes, turnips, squash, beets, lettuce, broccoli and many other vegetables.
NEWS
By Kate Shatzkin and Kate Shatzkin,SUN STAFF | July 16, 1999
Gov. Parris N. Glendening has decided to appoint a task force to study the economic and environmental effects of large, factory-style hog farms in Maryland.Responding to a request from House Speaker Casper R. Taylor Jr., Glendening said he has directed his secretaries of agriculture and environment to pick "qualified individuals" to conduct the inquiry."We must avoid the well-publicized mistakes that have been made in other states," the governor wrote in a July 6 letter to Taylor. "Ultimately, we want our farmers to have the opportunity to profit from this agricultural enterprise without compromising our commitment to environmental excellence."
NEWS
October 12, 1993
For decades it has been a Maryland landmark. Drive out Green Spring Avenue to Worthington Road and feast your eyes on Sagamore Farm, the famed horse center where Native Dancer, one of the equine sport's great performers, once galloped. The white fences surrounding the 400-acre showplace farm and the romping thoroughbreds in the pasture came to signify all that was grand about Maryland's long racing tradition.But in recent years, Sagamore Farm has come to signify all that has gone wrong with Maryland racing.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | December 10, 2006
A growing number of health-conscious consumers are turning to beef, poultry, pork and other meats coming from pasture-raised livestock, and more Maryland farmers are striving to satisfy those appetites. The demand for grass-fed beef, lamb and other products has risen about 10 percent the past two years, according to Theo Weening, national meat coordinator for Whole Foods Market, the Austin, Texas-based company that identifies itself as the world's leading retailer of natural and organic foods.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | September 10, 2006
Cheryl DeBerry grew up on a 1,000-acre beef cattle and sheep farm in Tucker County, W. Va., where, as she put it, "There were no little towns nearby." When she moved to a tiny truck farm a mile outside Oakland, Md., a few years back, she brought her love of farming with her. On weekday evenings this time of the year, you're likely to find her in the vegetable patch picking tomatoes, peppers, kale, collard greens and extended-season strawberries, and readying them for sale at a local farmers' market.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | December 10, 2006
A growing number of health-conscious consumers are turning to beef, poultry, pork and other meats coming from pasture-raised livestock, and more Maryland farmers are striving to satisfy those appetites. The demand for grass-fed beef, lamb and other products has risen about 10 percent the past two years, according to Theo Weening, national meat coordinator for Whole Foods Market, the Austin, Texas-based company that identifies itself as the world's leading retailer of natural and organic foods.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | December 10, 2006
A growing number of health-conscious consumers are turning to beef, poultry, pork and other meats coming from pasture-raised livestock, and more Maryland farmers are striving to satisfy those appetites. The demand for grass-fed beef, lamb and other products has risen about 10 percent the past two years, according to Theo Weening, national meat coordinator for Whole Foods Market, the Austin, Texas-based company that identifies itself as the world's leading retailer of natural and organic foods.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | December 10, 2006
A growing number of health-conscious consumers are turning to beef, poultry, pork and other meats coming from pasture-raised livestock, and more Maryland farmers are striving to satisfy those appetites. The demand for grass-fed beef, lamb and other products has risen about 10 percent the past two years, according to Theo Weening, national meat coordinator for Whole Foods Market, the Austin, Texas-based company that identifies itself as the world's leading retailer of natural and organic foods.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | December 10, 2006
A growing number of health-conscious consumers are turning to beef, poultry, pork and other meats coming from pasture-raised livestock, and more Maryland farmers are striving to satisfy those appetites. The demand for grass-fed beef, lamb and other products has risen about 10 percent the past two years, according to Theo Weening, national meat coordinator for Whole Foods Market, the Austin, Texas-based company that identifies itself as the world's leading retailer of natural and organic foods.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to The Sun | October 29, 2006
With their shiny black and red shells, harlequin beetles look a lot like ladybugs, but when Beckie Gurley sees them on the leaves of the broccoli she's growing at Calvert's Gift Farm, she quickly smashes them between her fingers. Because Calvert's Gift is an organic farm, she and her husband, Jack, don't use any pesticides to keep creatures like the beetles at bay. They just pick them off with their hands, one at a time. The 5-acre parcel, nestled in rolling countryside in Sparks, produces heirloom tomatoes with mouthwatering names - Brandywine, Persimmon and Pineapple - as well as radishes, turnips, squash, beets, lettuce, broccoli and many other vegetables.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | September 10, 2006
Cheryl DeBerry grew up on a 1,000-acre beef cattle and sheep farm in Tucker County, W. Va., where, as she put it, "There were no little towns nearby." When she moved to a tiny truck farm a mile outside Oakland, Md., a few years back, she brought her love of farming with her. On weekday evenings this time of the year, you're likely to find her in the vegetable patch picking tomatoes, peppers, kale, collard greens and extended-season strawberries, and readying them for sale at a local farmers' market.
NEWS
By SUSAN REIMER and SUSAN REIMER,SUN REPORTER | June 28, 2006
It takes a lot of sour cherries to make one very sweet pie. About 250 sour cherries, give or take a few. And you have to act fast. This delicate fruit - rarely sold in supermarkets because of its fragility - is available at a few you-pick-'em farms in Maryland during a very brief harvest at the end of June and the beginning of July. Sour-cherry trees love the cooling summer winds of the Great Lakes region and the Pacific Northwest - Michigan is considered the cherry capital of the United States - but Maryland farmers can include the popular Montmorency tree in their orchards as well.
NEWS
By Joel McCord and Joel McCord,SUN STAFF | March 21, 2000
ROCKY RIDGE -- The smell from Rodney G. Harbaugh's hog farm hasn't been so bad lately, his neighbors say. But there are good days and bad days, and the bad days are pretty awful. "Sometimes, it's horrible," says Karen Kuhn, whose two-story colonial house is less than a mile from the Frederick County barns that hold Harbaugh's hogs. "It depends on which way the wind blows." Controversy over Harbaugh's hogs combined with growing concerns over large lot feeding operations elsewhere in Maryland and reports of hog-farm related environmental disasters in North Carolina have led to efforts put the brakes on the swine industry here.
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | December 10, 2006
A growing number of health-conscious consumers are turning to beef, poultry, pork and other meats coming from pasture-raised livestock, and more Maryland farmers are striving to satisfy those appetites. The demand for grass-fed beef, lamb and other products has risen about 10 percent the past two years, according to Theo Weening, national meat coordinator for Whole Foods Market, the Austin, Texas-based company that identifies itself as the world's leading retailer of natural and organic foods.
NEWS
By TED SHELSBY | December 25, 2005
Having stuffed our burlap sacks with enough greenery and crimson to garland a dozen windows, we set about choosing a tree. "It should be," muses my friend, "twice as tall as a boy. So a boy can't steal the star." The one we pick is twice as tall as me. A brave handsome brute that survives 30 hatchet strokes before it keels over with a creaking rending cry. - Truman Capote's A Christmas Memory The joy of cutting one's own Christmas tree that so many vicariously relive each year through this author's short story was played out across Maryland in recent weeks.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | May 25, 2004
In the past four years, the state of Maryland has worked to ease itself out of the cigarette business by buying out nearly all of the farmers who grow tobacco. But the success of the program has endangered more than the brown leaf grown in the southern part of the state since the 17th century. The buyout, along with suburban sprawl into farmland, has endangered the wood-framed tobacco barns used to dry the crop, according to the National Trust for Historic Preservation. Yesterday, the trust included tobacco barns of Southern Maryland on this year's list of America's Most Endangered Historic Places.
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