Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFarmland Preservation Program
IN THE NEWS

Farmland Preservation Program

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 12, 2001
The county commissioners agreed yesterday to add nine farms with more than 650 acres to the state's farmland preservation program, which pays landowners not to develop agricultural land. Commissioners Donald I. Dell and Robin Bartlett Frazier voted in favor of the petitions after a brief meeting yesterday. Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge was not present. "I'm real happy with what is happening right now," Dell said. "All the farmers seem to be getting interested in the program." Situated mostly near Taneytown and Lineboro, the farms will be officially enrolled in the Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Program if they get final approval from the board of the state Agricultural Land Preservation Foundation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
March 6, 2014
Maryland citizens who enjoy preserved farmland and open space should oppose legislation in the General Assembly that would take land out of agricultural preservation and allow commercial solar or wind power infrastructure to be built there. When the Maryland legislature created the state's farmland preservation program in 1977 it had a mission that should remain unchanged: To preserve good land for farmers and preserve open space for all Marylanders to enjoy. The proposed legislation embraces alternative energy, and there's nothing wrong with that.
Advertisement
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
Commissioner W. Benjamin Brown outlined an aggressive plan yesterday to nearly double the county's farmland preservation program -- a plan he says is crucial if Carroll is to reach its goal of preserving 100,000 acres by 2020.Under his proposal, county and state annual spending on Carroll's preservation program would grow to about $7 million, up from current spending of about $4 million.The money would allow the county to permanently set aside 3,500 acres of farmland a year, 1,500 acres more than it is able to preserve now."
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2003
The Carroll commissioners approved only a few tweaks to their proposed 2004 budget yesterday during the final scheduled work session on the spending plan, which still could be scrambled by impending state cuts. The most significant change approved yesterday would add $3 million to the county's agricultural land-preservation program to offset a lack of state funding for preservation. The commissioners said they were satisfied overall with the budget, which includes $245 million in operating money and $62 million in capital expenses.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | May 24, 1998
The seeds Carroll officials planted three years ago to revitalize the county's then-barren farmland preservation program are beginning to bear fruit.The number of rural landowners willing to put their property into agricultural land preservation districts had dropped from 50 a year to zero earlier this decade.But last year -- for the first time since 1991 -- the number of people willing to enter the program became more than a trickle. Seventeen property owners put 2,000 acres into preservation districts last year, and another 20 are putting 2,200 acres into districts this year.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | March 22, 1991
In a setback for Howard County's farmland preservation program, the University of Maryland has backed away from its plan to sell the government development rights to its 900-acre research farm in the heart of the county.Ray Miller, vice chancellor for agriculture and natural resources, said yesterday that "it became very obvious that certain political forces are not interested in funds going from one governmental agency to another." He declined to elaborate.In addition, he said, the university was informed by its lawyers that the county's farmland preservation program might place restrictions on future expansion of the university's Central Maryland Farm Research and Education Center.
NEWS
By Amy Worden and Amy Worden,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 11, 2001
HARRISBURG, Pa. - Long criticized for failing to slow down suburban sprawl, Pennsylvania now has something to brag about: national recognition of its farmland-preservation program. The state received an achievement award last week from American Farmland Trust, a nonprofit farmland-conservation group, for protecting more farmland than any other state. Since its creation in 1989, Pennsylvania's publicly funded Farmland Preservation Program has protected more than 1,400 farms and 180,000 acres of farmland from development.
NEWS
March 6, 2014
Maryland citizens who enjoy preserved farmland and open space should oppose legislation in the General Assembly that would take land out of agricultural preservation and allow commercial solar or wind power infrastructure to be built there. When the Maryland legislature created the state's farmland preservation program in 1977 it had a mission that should remain unchanged: To preserve good land for farmers and preserve open space for all Marylanders to enjoy. The proposed legislation embraces alternative energy, and there's nothing wrong with that.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2001
In an unprecedented action, the state of Maryland has issued an ultimatum to Carroll County commissioners: Repeal a contentious new zoning law by Jan. 15 or funds for your vaunted farmland preservation program will be cut. The zoning law, now 3 months old, counters the goals of the state's farmland preservation program and, more broadly, Gov. Parris N. Glendening's Smart Growth agenda, said Roy W. Kienitz, Maryland's secretary of planning. "Indeed, this appears to be the single largest step backward in rural land protection in Maryland in recent memory," he wrote in the letter dated yesterday to the commissioners.
NEWS
By Dan Morse and Dan Morse,SUN STAFF | March 21, 1996
Mary Zepp knows the pressures that western Howard County farmers face. Real estate agents started calling her 10 years ago right after her husband died."
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2002
The tumult surrounding a Carroll zoning ordinance passed in September has mostly died out, with county residents and state planning officials expressing satisfaction during a hearing last night at proposed amendments to the law they once reviled. "Quibbling over details aside, I think we're at a meeting of the minds here on the larger issue," said state Secretary of Planning Roy W. Kienitz, who a few months ago described the original law as one of the worst blows ever to Maryland's land preservation efforts.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2001
Carroll's share of land transfer taxes - revenue the state collects from property sales - nearly doubled last year to $654,815, which means more money for the county's farmland preservation efforts. That news arrives at the end of the county's most successful year of expanding the number of farms and acres in its farmland preservation program, one of the most productive in the country. "This is best [preservation] year we have ever had," Bill Powel, county preservation director, said in a report to the Carroll commissioners yesterday.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | December 14, 2001
Carroll's share of land transfer taxes - revenue the state collects from property sales - nearly doubled last year to $654,815, which means more money for the county's farmland preservation efforts. That news arrives at the end of the county's most successful year of expanding the number of farms and acres in its farmland preservation program, one of the most productive in the country. "This is best [preservation] year we have ever had," Bill Powel, county preservation director, said in a report to the Carroll commissioners yesterday.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | December 7, 2001
In an unprecedented action, the state of Maryland has issued an ultimatum to Carroll County commissioners: Repeal a contentious new zoning law by Jan. 15 or funds for your vaunted farmland preservation program will be cut. The zoning law, now 3 months old, counters the goals of the state's farmland preservation program and, more broadly, Gov. Parris N. Glendening's Smart Growth agenda, said Roy W. Kienitz, Maryland's secretary of planning. "Indeed, this appears to be the single largest step backward in rural land protection in Maryland in recent memory," he wrote in the letter dated yesterday to the commissioners.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | April 12, 2001
The county commissioners agreed yesterday to add nine farms with more than 650 acres to the state's farmland preservation program, which pays landowners not to develop agricultural land. Commissioners Donald I. Dell and Robin Bartlett Frazier voted in favor of the petitions after a brief meeting yesterday. Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge was not present. "I'm real happy with what is happening right now," Dell said. "All the farmers seem to be getting interested in the program." Situated mostly near Taneytown and Lineboro, the farms will be officially enrolled in the Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Program if they get final approval from the board of the state Agricultural Land Preservation Foundation.
NEWS
By Amy Worden and Amy Worden,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 11, 2001
HARRISBURG, Pa. - Long criticized for failing to slow down suburban sprawl, Pennsylvania now has something to brag about: national recognition of its farmland-preservation program. The state received an achievement award last week from American Farmland Trust, a nonprofit farmland-conservation group, for protecting more farmland than any other state. Since its creation in 1989, Pennsylvania's publicly funded Farmland Preservation Program has protected more than 1,400 farms and 180,000 acres of farmland from development.
NEWS
By Patrick Gilbert and Patrick Gilbert,Staff Writer | March 29, 1993
Baltimore County Executive Roger B. Hayden says he will introduce legislation to the County Council to create a farmland preservation program.The program would bring the county into conformance with new state regulations, although officials say they doubt it would be used much unless state agricultural preservation funds dry up.Since 1980, the county has participated in a state farmland preservation program that buys development rights to agricultural land....
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 8, 1998
RIVERHEAD, N.Y. -- Stung by criticism that he has failed to protect dwindling farmland from development, Suffolk County Executive Robert Gaffney says that he planned to revitalize a farmland preservation program that was started in the 1970s.In his annual state of the county address here to the Suffolk legislature, Gaffney said he would propose "a significant increase" in spending to buy development rights to farms on the East End, where nearly all of Suffolk's remaining 33,000 farm acres are located.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1999
The Rash brothers' farm, where gentle hills of timothy and alfalfa once supported one of the largest dairy herds in Carroll County, is more than another patch of farmland, the brothers say. It is the key to their comfortable retirement -- a 401(k) plan with fertilizer."Working people have pension plans, stocks and bonds to cash in. A farmer has land. How we sell it determines what kind of retirement we have," says Glenn Rash, 68, who owns the 400-acre farm west of Route 97 with brothers Edwin, 73, and Claude, 61.But to cash in their investment, the Rashes will need tomorrow to persuade the Carroll County commissioners to rezone more than 145 acres of farmland for an upscale golf course community with 50 homes.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | July 23, 1998
Commissioner W. Benjamin Brown outlined an aggressive plan yesterday to nearly double the county's farmland preservation program -- a plan he says is crucial if Carroll is to reach its goal of preserving 100,000 acres by 2020.Under his proposal, county and state annual spending on Carroll's preservation program would grow to about $7 million, up from current spending of about $4 million.The money would allow the county to permanently set aside 3,500 acres of farmland a year, 1,500 acres more than it is able to preserve now."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.