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By WAYNE HARDIN | November 29, 1992
A John Deere combine, forked teeth raised and extended, blasts straight ahead, taking up most of Main Street in west Townsend, Del. It roars by the butcher shop and several other small businesses, bounces over the Conrail tracks and turns off into a farm across from 17 ConAgra grain bins that dwarf everything within miles.It is a lingering image of a still-rural town, but a town possibly facing a new role.At the Townsend Fire Company hall, at the other end of Main Street, Dave Bailey walks among the equipment, reeling off year, make, model and nomenclature of each vehicle.
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By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 31, 2003
KINSTON, N.C. - Eddie Gray couldn't see, stand or tell what had happened. One second he was watching a machine churn out sheets of synthetic rubber to be molded into medical instruments, the next the room darkened, his ears rang and his knees scraped as he desperately cleared away the fallen chunks of cement that trapped him. "I remember looking out the corner of my eye and debris flying," Gray recalled, a bandage wrapped around his head where he received...
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By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 28, 1996
HAROUF, Lebanon -- The people of this town had abandoned their stony fields when the air grew thick with steel. Yesterday, they returned to a harvest of bitterness.They came back to their town in cars crowded with children and piled high with foam mattresses, and along the way skirted bomb craters and pieces of buildings. They came to see the results of 16 days of rocket and artillery duels between Israel and Hezbollah guerrillas that ended at dawn with a limited cease-fire.Harouf awaited them with blackened eyes and fresh scars.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 1996
CAMERON, Mo. -- At a topping-off party for Cameron's nearly completed new industrial plant -- over a long buffet table loaded with ribs, cured ham and smoked turkey-- more than 400 people were celebrating the return of bright times.Granted, local officials agree, this is not a prestigious deal like landing IBM or AT&T, but the plant is another sign that rural America is recovering from the economic downturn that struck in the 1980s.When the facility opens, it will bring 250 jobs and increase Cameron's population by 1,000.
NEWS
By Linda S. Wallace and Linda S. Wallace,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 2, 1992
FREDERICK, Okla. -- A dilapidated shell on the west side of town bore the first cryptic advertisement that something was amiss in rural America.It simply said, "Bloods."Then came graffiti on wooden barns, rickety tool sheds and the backs of stores on Main Street.One scribble in black paint said, "Police 187." Most folks in this tranquil town of 5,200 figured it was just juvenile gibberish.But Police Chief Jack Whitson read it as a warning that trouble was moving into this farming community, which lives off the deep, rich red Oklahoma earth.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 8, 1995
MARENGO, Ill. -- On a brisk fall day, months before the Pacific War ended, Sakaye Kometani arrived at her new home to find a ramshackle farmhouse overgrown with 5-foot ragweed, an outhouse in the yard, no running water. The four Kometani children never forgot that day -- it was the first time they saw their mother cry."Dad," they remember her tearfully saying, "how can you bring us to a place like this?"Freed from the barbed wire confinement of an internment camp, Mrs. Kometani and the children traveled from Wyoming to Chicago, then northwest to Marengo and a reunion with her husband.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1996
The County Commissioners, on a 2-1 vote, set the stage yesterday for Taneytown to move forward with the proposed rezoning of a 117-acre tract for industrial and residential development.The commissioners granted a waiver of zoning, allowing Taneytown officials to rezone the former Bollinger farm. Under state law, municipalities annexing land cannot rezone the property for five years -- without county approval -- if the proposed use "substantially" differs from the county's master plan.The tract is designated for agricultural use in Carroll's master plan.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 5, 1991
BELLE GLADE, Fla. -- Isaac Fulton, a 28-year-old truck driver, pulls the blue document out of his wallet and smiles like he's just won the lottery. It's the result of his AIDS test: negative."
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 31, 2003
KINSTON, N.C. - Eddie Gray couldn't see, stand or tell what had happened. One second he was watching a machine churn out sheets of synthetic rubber to be molded into medical instruments, the next the room darkened, his ears rang and his knees scraped as he desperately cleared away the fallen chunks of cement that trapped him. "I remember looking out the corner of my eye and debris flying," Gray recalled, a bandage wrapped around his head where he received...
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 12, 1996
CAMERON, Mo. -- At a topping-off party for Cameron's nearly completed new industrial plant -- over a long buffet table loaded with ribs, cured ham and smoked turkey-- more than 400 people were celebrating the return of bright times.Granted, local officials agree, this is not a prestigious deal like landing IBM or AT&T, but the plant is another sign that rural America is recovering from the economic downturn that struck in the 1980s.When the facility opens, it will bring 250 jobs and increase Cameron's population by 1,000.
NEWS
By Doug Struck and Doug Struck,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 28, 1996
HAROUF, Lebanon -- The people of this town had abandoned their stony fields when the air grew thick with steel. Yesterday, they returned to a harvest of bitterness.They came back to their town in cars crowded with children and piled high with foam mattresses, and along the way skirted bomb craters and pieces of buildings. They came to see the results of 16 days of rocket and artillery duels between Israel and Hezbollah guerrillas that ended at dawn with a limited cease-fire.Harouf awaited them with blackened eyes and fresh scars.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,SUN STAFF | March 6, 1996
The County Commissioners, on a 2-1 vote, set the stage yesterday for Taneytown to move forward with the proposed rezoning of a 117-acre tract for industrial and residential development.The commissioners granted a waiver of zoning, allowing Taneytown officials to rezone the former Bollinger farm. Under state law, municipalities annexing land cannot rezone the property for five years -- without county approval -- if the proposed use "substantially" differs from the county's master plan.The tract is designated for agricultural use in Carroll's master plan.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,Sun Staff Correspondent | May 8, 1995
MARENGO, Ill. -- On a brisk fall day, months before the Pacific War ended, Sakaye Kometani arrived at her new home to find a ramshackle farmhouse overgrown with 5-foot ragweed, an outhouse in the yard, no running water. The four Kometani children never forgot that day -- it was the first time they saw their mother cry."Dad," they remember her tearfully saying, "how can you bring us to a place like this?"Freed from the barbed wire confinement of an internment camp, Mrs. Kometani and the children traveled from Wyoming to Chicago, then northwest to Marengo and a reunion with her husband.
FEATURES
By WAYNE HARDIN | November 29, 1992
A John Deere combine, forked teeth raised and extended, blasts straight ahead, taking up most of Main Street in west Townsend, Del. It roars by the butcher shop and several other small businesses, bounces over the Conrail tracks and turns off into a farm across from 17 ConAgra grain bins that dwarf everything within miles.It is a lingering image of a still-rural town, but a town possibly facing a new role.At the Townsend Fire Company hall, at the other end of Main Street, Dave Bailey walks among the equipment, reeling off year, make, model and nomenclature of each vehicle.
NEWS
By Linda S. Wallace and Linda S. Wallace,Knight-Ridder News Service | February 2, 1992
FREDERICK, Okla. -- A dilapidated shell on the west side of town bore the first cryptic advertisement that something was amiss in rural America.It simply said, "Bloods."Then came graffiti on wooden barns, rickety tool sheds and the backs of stores on Main Street.One scribble in black paint said, "Police 187." Most folks in this tranquil town of 5,200 figured it was just juvenile gibberish.But Police Chief Jack Whitson read it as a warning that trouble was moving into this farming community, which lives off the deep, rich red Oklahoma earth.
NEWS
By Ellen Uzelac and Ellen Uzelac,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 5, 1991
BELLE GLADE, Fla. -- Isaac Fulton, a 28-year-old truck driver, pulls the blue document out of his wallet and smiles like he's just won the lottery. It's the result of his AIDS test: negative."
NEWS
By los angeles daily news | July 22, 1997
GETTYSBURG, Pa. - As the fire from thousands of thundering guns outside turned the sky smoky and gray that warm morning of July 3, 1863, Jennie Wade worked the dough for biscuits for the Union soldiers, pressing and patting it on the dough table in the small kitchen of her sister's home on Baltimore Street.In the next room, her sister, Georgia McClellan, lay on a walnut bedstead near the cradle where her 5-day-old son slept.Jennie Wade, her mother and younger brother had come for the occasion of the birth from their home on Breckenridge Street some blocks away in the small southern Pennsylvania farm town of Gettysburg.
NEWS
By JEFFREY FLEISHMAN and JEFFREY FLEISHMAN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 23, 2005
BERLIN -- Angela Merkel, a pastor's daughter known for her ambition, capped a remarkable rise through German politics yesterday by becoming the nation's first female chancellor and the first to have grown up in what was then communist East Germany. The 51-year-old conservative, the youngest person to reach the chancellor's office, will lead Europe's largest economy as head of a fragile coalition that faces high unemployment, low growth and problems with the welfare state. Less a charismatic campaigner than a sober tactician, Merkel is expected to rely on her gift of persuasion to keep the government from splintering along party lines.
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