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By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1995
The first exhibition game of the new kids in town, the Baltimore Bandits, will be Wednesday on the road against the vaunted Hershey Bears. Three days later, the teams will do it here. Just like the old days.Two weeks from tomorrow, it's the American Hockey League opener at the Arena against another new AHL entry, the Carolina Monarchs (cue the trumpets).Try as they might, though, the Bandits are having problems thinking about the neutral-zone trap and the power play. No wonder. The first thing resembling a full practice won't be for a couple more days.
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NEWS
By David Driver, For The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
When he was at Sunset Elementary School in Pasadena, Glynn Davis was the fastest runner in his class. He recalls that the school held a field day every year, and he was never defeated in the 100-yard dash. Davis, 22, is using that speed as a center fielder for the Frederick Keys, the Orioles' Single-A Advanced farm team in the Carolina League. "As far as I can remember, I have been a fast guy," said Davis, a graduate of Northeast High School. "That is what I have modeled my game after.
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NEWS
By David Driver, For The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2014
When he was at Sunset Elementary School in Pasadena, Glynn Davis was the fastest runner in his class. He recalls that the school held a field day every year, and he was never defeated in the 100-yard dash. Davis, 22, is using that speed as a center fielder for the Frederick Keys, the Orioles' Single-A Advanced farm team in the Carolina League. "As far as I can remember, I have been a fast guy," said Davis, a graduate of Northeast High School. "That is what I have modeled my game after.
NEWS
By Jessica Dexheimer and Jessica Dexheimer,Sun reporter | August 12, 2007
The family-friendly barbecue was supposed to be a showcase of Howard County's best produce, but it had some of the county's top officials nervous. It was the Howard County Fair's version of television's popular Iron Chef competition, but the head chefs were no professionals. Behind the grills were County Executive Ken Ulman, school Superintendent Sydney L. Cousin, Dr. Peter L. Beilenson, the county heath officer, and Tim Dowd of Circle D Farms and the Farm Bureau. Each contestant was trying hard to outdo his competition in the third annual cook-off, which took place Thursday evening.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | August 7, 1994
Among the perks of a Camden Club membership are monthly luncheons with Orioles players during the season. The format is casual -- a 45-minute lunch followed by a question-and-answer period with several people from the Orioles organization.I joined my legal-eagle buddy, Camden Club member Frances Reaves, at the luncheon, which featured O's manager Johnny Oates and O's catcher Jeff Tackett. Others at her table were Diane Bark, stockbroker; Edie Brown, public relations director at the Baltimore Arena; and Renee Ades, one of the founders of NeighborCare pharmacies.
SPORTS
By Bill Tanton | November 30, 1993
The NFL owners who met near Chicago today to vote on expansion would be surprised if they knew how Baltimoreans have come to feel about all this."I don't think anybody cares any more," says Chris Hutchins, who owns and operates Bacharach Rasin sporting goods.Hutchins is no disinterested bystander. Not ordinarily. This man loves sports.He put up his money last summer to buy club seats in case the NFL does come back. He went to the USAir Arena last Friday and was thrilled by Maryland's upset win over Georgetown in basketball -- even though he's a North Carolina grad.
NEWS
By George Grella | August 7, 1994
In the olden, golden days of baseball, before the great westward migration, artificial surfaces, designated hitters and million-dollar utility infielders, the American League conducted its business in the manner of a formal court dance.The so-called pennant race resembled a sedate minuet, a stately saraband, in which a handful of teams minced around pretending to fight for the championship, with Chicago or Cleveland or Detroit making occasional flaccid gestures toward first place, while the other participants, fatigued and neurasthenic, watched politely from the sidelines.
NEWS
June 8, 1995
The National Basketball Association holds its draft in three weeks and three college sophomores, including Maryland's Joe Smith, are expected to be top picks. Seven college juniors are also registered for the draft, and Kevin Garnett, a high school senior in Chicago.It would actually make more sense for the 18-year-old prep player to be selected than the college underclassmen. At least that wouldn't constitute the culmination of a farce. Colleges that enroll gifted athletes do so knowing education is often the least of what many of them want.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | August 21, 1992
Pieces of column too short to use:This is an example of the kind of letter I get from helpful readers who want the rest of us to be fully informed and consumer savvy: "Two things learned at the Post Office today: (1.) Letters feeling heavier than 29 cents do not require another 29-cent stamp; all that is needed for the next unit is 23 cents. (2.) First-class letters that are fatter than the usual (one-quarter inch or more) are charged an additional 10 cents. (Another rip-off)." The letter was unsigned.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee | September 1, 2002
Here's a thought that will not earn me any friends from the ranks of CART fans. Supporters of the CART series want positive things to read about their favorite open-wheel series. And I'd like to write them. But it's difficult to find the positives at a time when CART is struggling to re-establish itself as a viable major player in the sport. During a conference call with Formula One driver David Coulthard, who will be at Indianapolis Motor Speedway this month, this question was asked: Has the success of some former CART drivers in F-1 increased the regard that F-1 participants and contractors have for CART?
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | April 6, 2006
The Orioles' farm system has been drawing its best reviews in years, and with four teams starting play this week, prospect watchers should have plenty to talk about. The three teams within easy driving distance of Baltimore - low Single-A Delmarva, high Single-A Frederick and Double-A Bowie - all feature players considered vital to the Orioles' future. "We very strongly expect this to be a very exciting year," said David Stockstill, the Orioles' director of minor league operations. Triple-A Ottawa lies farther from reach but is stocked with major league veterans who could be called up quickly if the club's bullpen or utility players falter.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee | September 1, 2002
Here's a thought that will not earn me any friends from the ranks of CART fans. Supporters of the CART series want positive things to read about their favorite open-wheel series. And I'd like to write them. But it's difficult to find the positives at a time when CART is struggling to re-establish itself as a viable major player in the sport. During a conference call with Formula One driver David Coulthard, who will be at Indianapolis Motor Speedway this month, this question was asked: Has the success of some former CART drivers in F-1 increased the regard that F-1 participants and contractors have for CART?
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | August 8, 1999
The underside of a freeway ramp doesn't seem the most likely spot for a colorful profusion of flowers, fruits, vegetables and crafts, but the Baltimore Farmers' Market flourishes there every Sunday morning from June until December.Steamy or sleety, the day begins early. Vendors arrive at Saratoga and Holliday streets under the Jones Falls Expressway as early as 4:30 a.m. or 5 a.m. to set up for the 8 a.m. opening. Preparations at home begin even earlier."We start picking on Friday and pick all day Saturday," says Richard Seletzky, who, with his son Ian, sells vegetables and flowers.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,SUN STAFF | September 21, 1995
The first exhibition game of the new kids in town, the Baltimore Bandits, will be Wednesday on the road against the vaunted Hershey Bears. Three days later, the teams will do it here. Just like the old days.Two weeks from tomorrow, it's the American Hockey League opener at the Arena against another new AHL entry, the Carolina Monarchs (cue the trumpets).Try as they might, though, the Bandits are having problems thinking about the neutral-zone trap and the power play. No wonder. The first thing resembling a full practice won't be for a couple more days.
NEWS
June 8, 1995
The National Basketball Association holds its draft in three weeks and three college sophomores, including Maryland's Joe Smith, are expected to be top picks. Seven college juniors are also registered for the draft, and Kevin Garnett, a high school senior in Chicago.It would actually make more sense for the 18-year-old prep player to be selected than the college underclassmen. At least that wouldn't constitute the culmination of a farce. Colleges that enroll gifted athletes do so knowing education is often the least of what many of them want.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | August 7, 1994
Among the perks of a Camden Club membership are monthly luncheons with Orioles players during the season. The format is casual -- a 45-minute lunch followed by a question-and-answer period with several people from the Orioles organization.I joined my legal-eagle buddy, Camden Club member Frances Reaves, at the luncheon, which featured O's manager Johnny Oates and O's catcher Jeff Tackett. Others at her table were Diane Bark, stockbroker; Edie Brown, public relations director at the Baltimore Arena; and Renee Ades, one of the founders of NeighborCare pharmacies.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1994
Taking its cue from major-league baseball and hockey, the NPSL plans to create a farm system.The network will have about 40 low-budget teams, or franchises, that will play a schedule of perhaps 20 weekend games, according to Spirit owner Bill Stealey. Most of the players will be recent college graduates with full-time jobs.The Spirit's reserve teams might play out of Richmond, Va., Washington or Northern Virginia and Baltimore. Stealey might own and operate one or more of the teams. The NPSL plans for play to begin next season.
NEWS
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff | August 8, 1999
The underside of a freeway ramp doesn't seem the most likely spot for a colorful profusion of flowers, fruits, vegetables and crafts, but the Baltimore Farmers' Market flourishes there every Sunday morning from June until December.Steamy or sleety, the day begins early. Vendors arrive at Saratoga and Holliday streets under the Jones Falls Expressway as early as 4:30 a.m. or 5 a.m. to set up for the 8 a.m. opening. Preparations at home begin even earlier."We start picking on Friday and pick all day Saturday," says Richard Seletzky, who, with his son Ian, sells vegetables and flowers.
NEWS
By George Grella | August 7, 1994
In the olden, golden days of baseball, before the great westward migration, artificial surfaces, designated hitters and million-dollar utility infielders, the American League conducted its business in the manner of a formal court dance.The so-called pennant race resembled a sedate minuet, a stately saraband, in which a handful of teams minced around pretending to fight for the championship, with Chicago or Cleveland or Detroit making occasional flaccid gestures toward first place, while the other participants, fatigued and neurasthenic, watched politely from the sidelines.
SPORTS
By Doug Brown and Doug Brown,Sun Staff Writer | March 1, 1994
Taking its cue from major-league baseball and hockey, the NPSL plans to create a farm system.The network will have about 40 low-budget teams, or franchises, that will play a schedule of perhaps 20 weekend games, according to Spirit owner Bill Stealey. Most of the players will be recent college graduates with full-time jobs.The Spirit's reserve teams might play out of Richmond, Va., Washington or Northern Virginia and Baltimore. Stealey might own and operate one or more of the teams. The NPSL plans for play to begin next season.
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