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By Carl Schoettler | August 25, 1997
She spent her last hours of royalty handing out ribbons to young equitation riders, dipping homemade ice cream at the dairy bar and posing with Guernseys for the last of about a million photos taken of her in the past year.Then last night, a little sadly, Gina Rende ended her reign as 1996 Maryland Farm Queen, crowning her successor at the 116th Maryland State Fair.Fresh and unspoiled, lively and pretty, bright and athletic, Gina has been just about everything the Farm Queen's supposed to be -- and then some.
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NEWS
August 17, 2005
THE ISSUE The Howard County Fair celebrated its 60th anniversary this year, still clinging to reminders of the county's rural heritage. Visitors could watch such traditional events as the horse, mule and tractor pull, the cow-milking competition - even the "Farm Queen" (Miss Howard County Farm Bureau) contest, complete with tiara. But in an era of online video games and instant messaging, how long can such quaint amusements draw the young people who make up an ever-increasing part of the county's suburban population?
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NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | August 2, 1994
Amid whistles and cheers, Mary Ellen Seraydian accepted another crown last night.The Francis Scott Key High senior, who served as Carroll County's Dairy Princess this past year, was crowned Carroll County's Farm Queen."
FEATURES
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 30, 2004
She'd grown up on a 230-acre dairy farm, in a family that had been farming in Maryland for six generations. But even with those credentials, Michele Robinson looked astonished when, on the opening night of the 2004 state fair, she was chosen over 19 other young women to be the first-ever Miss Maryland Agriculture. Along with honest surprise, there was also a bit of irony for 19-year-old Robinson, who admitted before the contest: "If you would have told me I was doing this five years ago, I would have laughed.
NEWS
June 5, 1991
Lisa Messenger, a junior at Old Mill Senior High School, has been crowned queen of the Anne Arundel County Farm Bureau for 1991.The 4-H member will represent Anne Arundel County for the second consecutive year at events such as the state Farm Bureau convention in December. As queen, she will promote farm education and bureau work and act as a goodwill ambassador to the farm community.Messenger, who lives on a small farm in Severn, helps her family raise and train quarter horses and grow vegetables.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,Contributing Writer Amy Miller contributed to this article | August 4, 1993
At the Carroll County 4-H and FFA Fair Monday night, six young women put aside their farm chores and pulled on their sequined-satin prom night finest.This was the Carroll County Farm Queen contest, for farm women 16 through 18. They had been invited to talk about agriculture.None was more electrifying than Marie Speak, 18, recently returned from a two-week tour of European farms with the United States Dairy Judging Team."From the rolling hills of Carroll County to the alpine peaks of Switzerland," she said, "I've learned a lot about the methods of agriculture.
NEWS
By Lorraine Gingerich and Lorraine Gingerich,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 10, 2000
THE THIRD time is a charm for this year's Howard County Farm Queen winner, Jamie Bullock of Ellicott City. "It's a huge honor, said Jamie, 18. "I'm just excited that I was chosen."
NEWS
By Shanon D. Murray and Shanon D. Murray,Staff Writer | August 17, 1992
It didn't matter that Brandi Nicole Schwinn is from Brooklyn Park, the most urban part of the county, nor that she lives on a 5-acre "farmette."It also made no difference to the Anne Arundel County Farm Bureau that the 17-year-old was the only contestant vying for the title of County Farm Queen.What was important to the bureau's judges was her knowledge of farming and her desire to promote the role of agriculture and the farming community."I don't want people to think I won because I was the only one competing," said the North County High School senior.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,SUN STAFF | August 11, 1996
The farm queen to be crowned today at the 51st Annual Howard County Fair may actually turn out to be the suburban farm queen.Only one of the six contestants in this year's competition actually lives on a farm. The rest are 4-H members from "minifarms" -- or "farmettes," as organizers put it -- raising rabbits or riding horses in the suburbs."There used to be at least one girl from a dairy farm, another maybe from a grain farm and one who raised sheep or goats on her folks' farm," said Annette Fleishell, secretary of the Howard County Farm Bureau Women's Committee, which organizes the event.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
The Maryland Farm Bureau wants to bring royalty back to county fairs. After renaming the six-decade-old competition last year to the Agricultural Ambassador Contest and giving up crowns and formal gowns in favor of businesslike blazers, the farm bureau's board of directors decided Tuesday to return to the tradition. The blazers are out. The tiaras are back. The winners will again be named farm queen. "Last year, we made a change, we tried it out," said state bureau President Earl Hance.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2004
The glamour was back at the Howard County Fair this year as three young women wore formal gowns and high-heeled shoes into the show ring to compete to be the county's spokeswoman for agriculture. Organizers put a new name - the Miss Howard County Farm Bureau Contest - on a competition that looked a lot like the Farm Queen contest that was held for six decades until last summer. Emma Bullock of Ellicott City won the competition yesterday, which welcomed back dressy gowns after the women wore less formal dresses last year.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2004
The Maryland farm queen standoff has been peacefully resolved. In one camp were those who thought farm queens seemed too old-fashioned in their tiaras and gowns. Their opponents thought the queens' updated successors, the agricultural ambassadors, were uninspiring in their businesslike blazers. As a compromise, young women will compete this year at the State Fair to be Miss Maryland Agriculture. The Maryland Farm Bureau and the Maryland State Fair reached an agreement yesterday after splitting over the best way to run the annual competition for agriculture spokeswomen ages 16 to 19. "We had to work it out," said Andy Cashman, assistant general manager of the fair.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2004
Farm queens are returning to Maryland, but they will not reign at the Maryland State Fair. Two days after the Maryland Farm Bureau restored the traditional formal dress, shiny tiaras and royal title to its annual competition, the fair's board of directors voted to end its six-decade association with the contest. The fair's board unanimously decided Thursday night that the right decision was made last year when the fair and the farm bureau abandoned the farm queen for the more modern, inclusive title of agricultural ambassador.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2004
The Maryland Farm Bureau wants to bring royalty back to county fairs. After renaming the six-decade-old competition last year to the Agricultural Ambassador Contest and giving up crowns and formal gowns in favor of businesslike blazers, the farm bureau's board of directors decided Tuesday to return to the tradition. The blazers are out. The tiaras are back. The winners will again be named farm queen. "Last year, we made a change, we tried it out," said state bureau President Earl Hance.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander | August 7, 2003
Howard County's new Farm Bureau agricultural ambassador, Anna Marie Schlicht, will spend her 17th birthday today as she has spent many others - at the Howard County Fair. Schlicht raises beef, swine and poultry on a 1-acre farm in Clarksville and has been active in 4-H since she was 10 years old. So she is usually at the fair in early August. This was the first year Schlicht was old enough to enter the ambassador contest - sponsored by the Howard County Farm Bureau Women and previously called the Farm Queen Contest.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | July 21, 2003
For the first time in six decades, there will be no Farm Queen at the Maryland State Fair. Gone are the crowns and the gowns. And the fate of the traditional sashes is in question. Beginning this year, the young woman who most impresses the judges with her poise and her knowledge of farming in Maryland will be named the Maryland Farm Bureau Agricultural Ambassador. And she will accept the title wearing a black blazer with a Farm Bureau insignia instead of a formal dress. The state Farm Bureau and the fair are attempting to modernize the longstanding Farm Queen contest and draw more participants with the new name and other changes.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | August 9, 2004
The glamour was back at the Howard County Fair this year as three young women wore formal gowns and high-heeled shoes into the show ring to compete to be the county's spokeswoman for agriculture. Organizers put a new name - the Miss Howard County Farm Bureau Contest - on a competition that looked a lot like the Farm Queen contest that was held for six decades until last summer. Emma Bullock of Ellicott City won the competition yesterday, which welcomed back dressy gowns after the women wore less formal dresses last year.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | May 15, 2004
The Maryland farm queen standoff has been peacefully resolved. In one camp were those who thought farm queens seemed too old-fashioned in their tiaras and gowns. Their opponents thought the queens' updated successors, the agricultural ambassadors, were uninspiring in their businesslike blazers. As a compromise, young women will compete this year at the State Fair to be Miss Maryland Agriculture. The Maryland Farm Bureau and the Maryland State Fair reached an agreement yesterday after splitting over the best way to run the annual competition for agriculture spokeswomen ages 16 to 19. "We had to work it out," said Andy Cashman, assistant general manager of the fair.
NEWS
By Jean Marie Beall and Jean Marie Beall,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 22, 2002
TANEYTOWN resident Angie Rasche is this year's Carroll County Farm Bureau's Farm Queen. "It's a huge honor and I take a lot of pride in it," said Angie, the daughter of Mary and Bill Rasche. "I know the title will give me a lot of opportunities." The 17-year-old was named Farm Queen during the Carroll County 4-H/FFA Fair last month. She became involved with 4-H when she joined Rolling Clover 4-H Club nine years ago. Initially, Angie was involved in crafts, baking and photography. The past four years she has been involved with livestock.
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