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By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1996
A decision by the Baltimore County government shifting $2 million from its agricultural preservation program to school construction will be a setback to the effort to save the dwindling supply of farmland from development."
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NEWS
March 6, 2014
Maryland citizens who enjoy preserved farmland and open space should oppose legislation in the General Assembly that would take land out of agricultural preservation and allow commercial solar or wind power infrastructure to be built there. When the Maryland legislature created the state's farmland preservation program in 1977 it had a mission that should remain unchanged: To preserve good land for farmers and preserve open space for all Marylanders to enjoy. The proposed legislation embraces alternative energy, and there's nothing wrong with that.
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NEWS
November 24, 1993
Howard County's newly revived farm preservation program hit the ground running, with an advisory board's recent recommendation to buy development rights from all 10 property owners who wish to sell.Among the tracts to be acquired is a real prize, the 723-acre Holly House Farm near West Friendship. It's the largest property ever considered for the program.The county government has $11.5 million in its preservation fund -- an amount deemed more than enough to purchase the properties. If County Executive Charles Ecker agrees to make the offers and the owners accept, 1,910 acres of county land would be saved in perpetuity from development.
EXPLORE
December 19, 2012
For those folks seeking to leave the state's farm preservation program because they feel that  they are incapable of financially succeeding in modern day Howard County,  perhaps they should simply sell their farm property at fair agricultural value to those capable of being successful in these present circumstances. They would probably find a number of potential buyers in that process and preserve the integrity of the preservation program as well. Of course they would not make nearly as much money that way.  Steve Curtis Dayton
NEWS
December 12, 1990
WESTMINSTER - The Carroll County Commissioners approved 23 properties for the farmland preservation program last week, but only after Commissioner Julia Gouge first expressed concerns over two farms.One of the farms, a 50-acre property south of Shiloh Road near Hampstead, had been subdivided in the past, Gouge said. Bill Powel, county administrator for farm preservation, said some lots north of Shiloh Road had been sold, but the south parcel was considered separate.A second property, 60 acres near Wakefield Valley Road, is contiguous to New Windsor, and Gouge expressed concern about sealing the town's corporate borders.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | March 22, 2002
Julia Walsh Gouge told a crowd of about 50 gathered on the steps of the County Office Building yesterday that she wants to keep her job as county commissioner and will seek a fourth term. Gouge, 61, was the first woman elected to the board in 1986 and was re-elected in 1990. After a four-year hiatus from politics, she ran again in 1998 and won by the largest majority. She has served as president of the three-member board this term. With an American flag scarf pinned on her lapel and her sculpted red, white and blue elephant in the background, Gouge made pitches for growth control, improved communication with the state and the county's eight towns, strong economic development and farm preservation.
NEWS
March 25, 1996
MARYLAND HAS been a pioneer in farmland preservation. Its 146,500 acres protected since 1980 is more than double any other state, and its $128 million investment in agricultural easements is one-fifth of the U.S. total.So a story last week that Howard County was running out of money to continue purchasing development rights from farmers set off alarm bells. That, coupled with reports out of Carroll County about legislative mischief to ease development of farmland, was enough to stir speculation that Maryland was about to lead farm preservation on its way down.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff Writer | November 16, 1993
The county's farm preservation program got a roaring kick-start last night as its advisory board recommended making offers to buy development rights from all 10 property owners who wanted them.And among the properties the Agricultural Land Preservation Advisory Board recommended for approval was the largest ever to be considered for inclusion in the program. The nine members of the Beck family who own the 723-acre Holly House Farm, between Triadelphia and Folly Quarter roads near West Friendship, would be offered nearly $4.8 million to for their development rights.
NEWS
April 24, 1998
IF FARM preservation is to remain a priority for Carroll County, the commissioners are doing the right thing in honoring the bonus promised landowners who put acres into the program about a decade ago.The unwritten pledge of the county to pay a 5 percent bonus to those who entered the farm preservation program before 1992 will stand, though it may cost $1 million. An advisory board had urged that the money be used to buy more farm easements.The basic issue is trust in government. Many farmers feel their land development rights were unfairly reduced when Carroll in 1978 drastically limited the number of homes that could be built on farms.
NEWS
June 24, 2005
CARROLL COUNTY Farm Preservation program may grow by about 200 acres Carroll County's farm preservation program could grow by nearly 200 acres after commissioners recommended yesterday that farms in Uniontown and Manchester be added to existing agricultural preservation districts. The landowners can apply for placement in the Critical Farms Program, which permanently safeguards agricultural land from development. Seventy-four acres on Basehores Mill Road near Uniontown will become part of nearly 9,000 preserved acres in western Carroll, and a 100-acre farm on Maple Grove Road in Manchester is contiguous to several preserved parcels in the northern area of the county.
NEWS
By Jasmine Jernberg and Steven Stanek and Jasmine Jernberg and Steven Stanek,Sun Reporters | July 9, 2008
Anne Arundel County has received state funding to preserve a 183-acre farm in Lothian and is on its way to getting money for two more properties in South County. The state Board of Public Works has approved $2 million in funding for the $2.6 million purchase of an easement on the William Hall farm on Route 2, and the Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Foundation is considering applications by two more farmers for 306 acres of rural property in Harwood. The easement - essentially an agreement that allows the state to control the land, impose development restrictions and perform regular inspections - was reviewed by the board of the MALPF and the county, which will contribute $670,000 in matching funds.
NEWS
By MARY ELLEN SLAYTER and MARY ELLEN SLAYTER,CAPITAL NEWS SERVICE | October 28, 2005
The Chesapeake Bay Foundation presented the General Assembly with its legislative wish list Tuesday, calling for the state to commit $100 million a year to preserve farmland and make agriculture more environmentally friendly. Kim Coble, Maryland executive director for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation, outlined the group's requests at a meeting of the Agricultural Stewardship Commission. She described the open-ended budget requests as "appropriate," and said they were based on a consensus of agriculture and environmental experts around the state.
NEWS
October 14, 2005
Chesapeake Fields Institute, a nonprofit research and marketing group that tries to help farmers be profitable, will be honored tonight in New York City for programs in natural food certification and alternative agriculture. The annual Harvest Awards are given by the Glynwood Center, which seeks to focus attention on preserving rural communities. Chesapeake Fields was formed on the Eastern Shore five years ago to help farmers learn to be more profitable. The institute is being honored, in part, for developing products that are being marketed in the U.S. and abroad.
NEWS
June 24, 2005
CARROLL COUNTY Farm Preservation program may grow by about 200 acres Carroll County's farm preservation program could grow by nearly 200 acres after commissioners recommended yesterday that farms in Uniontown and Manchester be added to existing agricultural preservation districts. The landowners can apply for placement in the Critical Farms Program, which permanently safeguards agricultural land from development. Seventy-four acres on Basehores Mill Road near Uniontown will become part of nearly 9,000 preserved acres in western Carroll, and a 100-acre farm on Maple Grove Road in Manchester is contiguous to several preserved parcels in the northern area of the county.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | April 16, 2005
Four years ago, in what was hailed then as the largest land preservation deal in Maryland history, officials paid $8 million to the owner of Chino Farms in Queen Anne's County to ensure that its 5,000 acres along the Chester River would remain home to bald eagles, endangered squirrels and thousands of ducks and geese. Now, 114 suburban homes are planned on a neighboring farm, and more may be on the way for Chino's other borders. The situation, playing out now before the county's planning commission, highlights the growing challenges of preserving farming in Maryland as suburbia spreads across the state.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2005
A pioneer in trying to save farms from development, Howard County has since become a leader in the opposite direction - losing a greater share of its farmland over the past decade to homes, malls and highways than any other county in Maryland. Sandwiched between Baltimore and Washington, once-bucolic Howard has become so thoroughly suburban in the past 25 years that state planners now question the value of investing more public funds in buying up the remaining farmers' development rights.
NEWS
By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,SUN STAFF | April 24, 1996
The money available to save farmland this year is less than expected, state officials said yesterday, adding new urgency to the quest to reform Maryland's agricultural land preservation program.The state will have $7.8 million to offer farmers for development rights, about $1 million less than expected, Paul W. Scheidt, executive director of the Maryland Agricultural Land Preservation Foundation, told the group's trustees at a meeting in Annapolis.Much of the shortfall results from lower-than-expected agriculture transfer taxes, which are collected when farms are sold.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | March 30, 2004
Members of Howard County's agricultural land preservation board approved four applications to preserve small farms in the county's rural west last night. The farms, all between 20 acres and 32.5 acres, became eligible for Howard's program last year when the County Council approved changes to include smaller farms adjacent to preserved property or county lands. The program now oversees more than 13,000 acres. Landowners who place their property under agricultural easements still own it, but agree not to develop the land in exchange for small payments over time.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 31, 2003
Six farms are featured on Carroll County's farm tour and open house tomorrow, an event designed to highlight the county's 25-year history of agricultural land preservation, which has saved nearly 42,000 acres from development. Visitors can tour dairy, grain and livestock operations at farms that are enrolled in the preservation effort. "We want to give the general public the opportunity to be part of our 25th anniversary by visiting the farms, talking to the owners and hearing from us about preservation," said Bill Powel, Carroll's preservation program manager.
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