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NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 30, 1997
City kids -- from Shanghai and Beijing -- came to the country yesterday, visiting the Carroll County 4-H Fair and gushing in Chinese over farm animals.For the first time, the People's Republic of China has allowed children of its diplomatic corps to visit the United States.Embassy staff members in Washington traditionally leave their children with relatives in China during tours of duty. "This is really enjoyment for the children, their first holiday spent in the U.S.," said Jing Hua Cao, embassy staff member and translator.
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NEWS
By Judy Reilly and Judy Reilly,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 27, 1997
WHEN HE WAS a boy growing up on a dairy farm in Keysville, Don Shoemaker looked forward to his parents' return from the Great Frederick Fair with a new toy for him.Shoemaker has saved these toys -- tractors, farm equipment and other models of farm life in the 1940s and 1950s -- and created a collection that numbers 1,000. This childhood hobby has grown into a passionate search for rare and beautiful toys.Shoemaker and his son Andrew, 16, a student at Francis Scott Key High School, travel to a dozen toy shows a year in search of an item that might complete an aspect of their collection, or the show-stopping piece that might start something new.Their John Deere, International Harvester, Oliver, and Massey Harris toys, designed to one-16th scale, are in their original condition or restored and fill a room the two built last year.
NEWS
By Nora Koch and Nora Koch,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 7, 1997
"On the Land: Three Centuries of American Farm Life" documents five of the oldest family-owned farms in America. The exhibit of Stan Shearer's photographs, with text by Michael Geary, depicts families performing daily tasks that regulate their lives.Shearer's work, which will remain on display at Carroll County Arts Council Gallery in Westminster through Feb. 21, should strike a chord in a community with deep farming roots, said Hilary Hatfield, the arts council's executive director."I think the exhibit talks about the importance of family and how the family unit runs a farm," Hatfield said.
BUSINESS
By Sherry Graham and Sherry Graham,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 14, 1996
It seems fitting that the town of Woodbine straddles a slowly meandering portion of the Patapsco River.It seems right that the community is part of both Carroll and Howard counties.Tucked along the southwest corner of Carroll and a northwest section of Howard County, Woodbine is a mix of the past and the present. The railroad tracks that follow the Patapsco's flow once routinely brought freight trains to a thriving agricultural village.In the first half of this century, area farmers brought their produce to the weigh station near the tracks.
NEWS
By Lisa T. Hill and Lisa T. Hill,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 8, 1996
For generations, farm women have been the unsung heroines, quietly forming the foundation for Carroll's agricultural growth.Yesterday, 31 such women were honored at a reception for "Women in Agriculture: Yesterday and Today" at Carroll Community College -- all timed to coincide with Women's History Month."
FEATURES
By Eileen Ogintz and Eileen Ogintz,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | January 14, 1996
All year long, the Tussins plan their trip home to the farm, excitement building as the trip nears. The fact that this suburban couple didn't grow up anywhere near a farm makes no difference.After four visits in as many years, the Tussin children can gather eggs, milk cows and feed goats with the best of them at New Hampshire's Inn at East Hill Farm, a working farm and informal resort in Troy that has been welcoming families for 50 years from around the country."Going to the farm is the best of what your childhood was," explains Naomi Tussin, a creative director who grew up on Long Island, N.Y., and now lives near Hartford, Conn.
FEATURES
By Mike Shoup and Mike Shoup,KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | November 19, 1995
KENLY, N.C. -- The trail through the tobacco heartland of America leads inevitably to this quiet little town in eastern North Carolina.Half of the nation's annual harvest of cigarette tobacco, nearly 1 billion pounds, is grown within 50 miles of Kenly, and it is here that the state's tobacco farmers have built a museum to enshrine their values and culture.The Tobacco Farm Life Museum is hardly a Smithsonian-level institution. But it is a good starting point for anyone following what might be called the Tobacco Trail in North Carolina, because the museum speaks to a way of life that's rapidly changing and, at least some farmers say, is even threatened with extinction.
FEATURES
December 25, 1994
The theme for the Christmas show at the U.S. Botanic Garden is holiday dreams. The show is open daily through Jan. 8, including Christmas and New Year's Day, from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The display includes more than 1,000 poinsettias, along with other holiday plants, two large topiary bears and toys. The East Gallery features a model train. Free. The garden is at 100 Maryland Ave. S.W. Call (202) 225-7099.*"Farm Day During the Winter" exposes children ages 6 to 12 to farm life during winter months at the Old Maryland Farm in Upper Marlboro Tuesday from 7 a.m. to 5 p.m. The cost is $15 and includes all activities, snacks and lunch cooked over an open fire.
NEWS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Staff Writer | May 15, 1994
The door of the milking barn rattles open at dawn, alerting the herd at Rocky Glade Farms.Cows, 160 of them, have gathered outside, languidly chewing on whatever cows chew before breakfast, their breath billowing into the cool spring air.They look like chubby customers waiting for a bank to open. Mothers, daughters and cousins carrying liquid assets.Nevin Hildebrand, 33, peers first at the herd, then at the tree line, as he enjoys the sunrise on his family's 230-acre farm an hour's drive west of Baltimore.
NEWS
By JoAnne C. Broadwater and JoAnne C. Broadwater,Contributing Writer | May 16, 1993
The group of Harford County pre-schoolers giggled wit delight when an energetic 6-week-old heifer guzzled milk from a specially designed bucket with a nipple."
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