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Farm Fair

ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | July 29, 2004
Mosey on over to the 'burbs this weekend for a couple of down-home farm fairs. The Harford County Farm Fair kicks off today and runs through Sunday at the Equestrian Center in Bel Air, and the Carroll County 4-H and FFA Fair takes place Saturday through Aug. 6 at the Carroll County Agriculture Center in Westminster. The old-fashioned country farm fair in Harford County features 4-H and Future Farmers of America exhibits, as well as livestock judging and auctions. There will be live music, food and crafts for sale, pony rides, a costumed-animal parade, kids activities and games, a moon bounce and more.
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NEWS
By Elisha King and Elisha King,Evening Sun Staff | August 2, 1991
At the sound of the bell they were off. Five squealing pigs racing around an oval track, kicking up their hooves in the Dash for Mash."I understand the loser is going to be invited to my house for dinner tonight," the announcer joked as the pigs scrambled by toward a bucket of slop.Just hours after the Harford County Farm Fair opened its gates yesterday, the first of wave of visitors was trampling the grass on the Equestrian Center grounds. Fair officials said they expected record crowds.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | July 29, 2007
Amid the chaos and shrieks of hundreds of children who attended the 20th annual Harford County Farm Fair, there was one booth where all was quiet. Tucked away in a large tent on the Equestrian Center fairgrounds in Bel Air, teenagers stared intently and furrowed their brows, contemplating their next move in a game of chess. Robert Quinton, 15, came to the fair from Howard County and lost a game in less than five minutes. But it didn't faze him. "I wanted to see how they are and kind of test their skills," Robert said of his opponents.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 24, 2005
Some people attend the Harford County Farm Fair for the animals, others for the food and games. For Norman Grafton, the attraction is something big, noisy - and definitely at home on the farm. "From the first time I went to the fair I became addicted to the fellowship of the people who participate in the antique tractor pull," said Grafton, co-chairman of the antique tractor events at the 18th annual fair, which takes place Thursday through July 31 in Bel Air. "I started out as a participant, and now I run the show.
NEWS
By Artika Rangan and Artika Rangan,SUN STAFF | July 25, 2004
Fireworks, rodeo shows and pig races are some of the many events scheduled for the 17th annual Harford County Farm Fair this week. Cynthia Warner, 4-H educator for Harford County, estimates that 50,000 to 80,000 people will attend the four-day event. The money raised by the fair will be used to sponsor the program again next year, she said. The fair will begin at 10 a.m. Thursday at the Equestrian Center on Tollgate Road in Bel Air. Thursday's events will include a 4-H dog show, barnyard bingo, magic show, antique tractor pull and other activities.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 31, 2005
Conor Perkins was having the time of his life. After two years of rejection, Conor, 12, had been chosen to judge the Suewee pig races at the 18th annual Harford County Farm Fair. He joined thousands of people who turned out for Thursday's opening festivities. Attendance was high, and lines were backing up shortly after the gates opened. Parking lots were filled, and shuttle buses were running constantly to designated locations. Vendors and craftsmen showed their wares. Livestock was being cleaned and groomed in barns and taken outside to dry in the warm sun. People filed through the tents and gathered to watch the shows and events.
NEWS
August 11, 1991
From: Daniel C. GuzewichBel Air BlueRecently, 15 boys comprising the Bel Air 9-10 year old boys baseball Blue team competed in the American Amateur Baseball Congress Regional Baseball Tournament in Waterbury, Conn.Although we did not win, we did Bel Air proud.But these boys could not have participated in such a memorable experience had it not been for the generosity of several of Bel Air's businesses and individuals who made contributions toward the expenses.The Bel Air Blue 9-10 baseball team would like to thank the Lions Club of Bel Air, Auto Village, Dr. Paul D. Chizmar, Gallery Auto Sales, Jones Chrysler Plymouth, Northeastern Plumbing and Heating, Robert O. Ryan (Ryan's Meats)
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | July 27, 1997
After years of complaints that the Harford County Farm Fair was not easily accessible to the disabled, a new parking lot and ramp have been installed to aid those who have problems with mobility.Disabled visitors no longer will have to maneuver wheelchairs across a grassy area to enter the fair at the Harford County Equestrian Center in Bel Air, said Richard O. Cook, chairman of the 10th annual fair. It begins Thursday.A donation by a local businessman and his family, and the cooperation of county officials, have led to a new blacktop parking lot leading to the door of the center, Cook said.
EXPLORE
EDITORIAL FROM THE AEGIS | July 24, 2012
The weather forecast for Thursday through Sunday calls for classic Maryland summer weather: highs in the 80s and low 90s, with a chance of afternoon thunderstorms, otherwise partly cloudy to mostly sunny. In other words, just about as good as could be expected for what has become over the past quarter of a century one of Harford County's signature events, the Farm Fair. Though the county's fair tradition pre-dates the current incarnation of the Harford County Farm Fair, the event slated to open this week was organized in its early days to showcase the work of local 4-H clubs and provide an inexpensive weekend of family friendly entertainment.
NEWS
By John Dedinas and John Dedinas,Contributing Writer | July 23, 1995
More than 70,000 people are expected to attend the annual Harford County Farm Fair from Thursday through Sunday at the Harford County Equestrian Center on North Tollgate Road in Bel Air.The fair, in its eighth year, has become increasingly popular, transforming the Harford 4-H Club from a struggling group to one of the fastest-growing 4-H clubs in the state.Last year, 4-H'ers had about 2,200 exhibits, and the number is up this year, said Elke Neuberger, chairwoman of the 4-H fair committee.
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