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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 28, 2001
MOLINE, Ill. - Deere & Co. said yesterday that it plans to sell its money-losing Homelite lawn care-products business and reorganize its construction and forestry division to cut about 2,000 jobs, or about 4.6 percent of its payroll. Homelite makes chainsaws, blowers and trimmers. Deere, the biggest farm equipment maker, will try to sell the Homelite operation in Chihuahua, Mexico, which employs 1,200. In Charlotte, N.C., and the South Carolina cities of Greer and Columbia, some or all of the Homelite business will be closed, and 475 jobs lost.
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NEWS
By Bill Talbott and Bill Talbott,Staff Writer | January 14, 1994
A large barn in the Upperco area containing 10 tons of hay and more than a dozen pieces of farm equipment burned to the ground in a three-alarm fire Wednesday night.The fire was discovered about 8 p.m. by Bruce Davidson, son of farm owner I. Watson Davidson, as he walked out of a garage next to his house, about 500 yards from the barn in the 1100 block of Emory Church Road.Bruce Davidson operates the Davidson Christmas Tree Farm, where hundreds of people cut their own tree during the holiday season.
NEWS
September 6, 1998
Area sculptor's exhibit depicts 'social viruses'"Virus," an installation of steel creations by area sculptor Jim Roberts, appears at the Esther Prangley Rice Gallery at Western Maryland College for a two-week show beginning Tuesday.Featuring a compilation of work Roberts began last year, the show of more than 100 pieces will run through Sept. 18, with an opening reception scheduled from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. Friday.The sculptures depict what he terms contemporary social viruses, such as television, computers, fast food and telephones -- items he perceives have relentlessly attacked society.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | March 19, 2000
The weather was just about frigid enough to freeze grass, but Chris Chaney of Glen Burnie was on the prowl for a lawn mower bargain yesterday. Hundreds of other people were looking for deep discounts, too -- on everything from tires and tractors to carpet and cabinets. It might seem like an odd combination. But at the Howard County Machinery Auction, almost everything is fair game. The one-day consignment sale -- held every spring and fall at the county fairgrounds in West Friendship -- draws several thousand people, mainly men, who have a hankering for machines, tools, spare parts, building material or a combination thereof.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
Residents and farmers in western Howard County sparred Thursday night over whether three farm families should be allowed to reclaim the development rights on their farmland - the first-ever attempt to defect from Maryland's agricultural land-preservation program. More than 100 people turned out for the hearing at the Howard County fairgrounds in West Friendship on the request by Steve, Mike and Mark Mullinix to withdraw their 490 acres from Maryland's program, which they had entered 28 years ago. The state paid $450,000 for an easement barring development - though owners who sold development rights before 2004 retain the right to ask out after 25 years if they can show that farming is no longer profitable.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2001
ALLENSTOWN, N.H. - They are noisy, smelly and seemingly able to rattle the marrow right out of your bones. Hardly selling points for a new consumer product. The product is the snowmobile. And with one crazy stunt 41 years ago, Edgar Hetteen made snowmobiles a must-have item for residents of North America's snow belt, and launched a $9 billion-a-year industry. There are an estimated 3 million snowmobiles in the United States and Canada. Twenty-six states have snowmobile associations that help maintain 135,000 miles of groomed trails, more than triple the miles in the Interstate Highway System.
NEWS
By Meg Tully, For The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
It was the first time Kai D'Angelo had ever picked a pumpkin, and the 4-year-old knew just what he was looking for. As he ran to hop onto a cow train ride at Clark's Elioak Farm in Ellicott City this week, he said his pumpkin would be a small one, and orange. Kai and his father planned to carve the pumpkin into a jack-o'-lantern for the front porch of their Columbia house. His mother said she was happy they had something fun to do together as they roamed over the farm. "He is fascinated with tractors and farms and farm equipment," said Jennifer D'Angelo.
NEWS
September 10, 1996
A barn and farm equipment on Maple Lawn Farms in Fulton were destroyed Sunday by a fire, the Howard County Fire and Rescue Services said.A Holstein bull was killed, and a diesel tractor and about 120 bales of hay worth a combined $30,000 wee burned. Damage to the barn was estimated at $40,000.The cause of the fire is under investigation.Girl found unconscious in parents' poolA 12-year-old Lisbon girl was pulled unconscious from her parent's pool Saturday in the 3000 block of Shady Lane after nearly drowning, fire officials said.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | May 18, 1999
RACINE, Wis. -- New Holland NV, the world's second-biggest farm-equipment maker, said yesterday that it will buy Case Corp. for $4.3 billion in cash to cut costs and compete better with market leader Deere & Co.New Holland will sell debt and equity to pay for the $55-a-share purchase, which is 23 percent higher than Case's closing price Friday and 51 percent more than a week ago. Fiat SpA, Italy's largest industrial company, owns 69 percent of New Holland...
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | November 30, 1991
Longshoremen in the port of Baltimore loaded 90 large pieces of agricultural equipment onto the NOSAC Sun this week, a shipment that maritime executives hope will persuade the Midwestern manufacturer of the machinery, J. I. Case, to become a regular user of the port."
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