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NEWS
December 23, 1997
The Carroll County Board of Zoning Appeals has conditionally approved a request for a farm equipment sales and service business near Taneytown.Samuel and Linda Battaglia asked for the conditional use on property at Brown Road and Route 194, north of Taneytown. The land is zoned agricultural.The couple purchases, repairs and sells used and new farm machinery. They bought the 54-acre property recently to relocate their business. The Battaglias estimate they will have an average of 10 customers a day, Mondays through Saturdays.
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NEWS
April 24, 2014
Local police were kept busy Thursday evening and into the night with several accidents, though none was serious, they said. The first happened around 5 p.m. on Aldino Road near Mahan Road in Churchville, according to Cpl. Monk of the Maryland State Police Bel Air Barrack. A large piece of farm equipment took out a phone pole along the road, he said. Aldino Road was closed for a short period of time, he said, and BGE was called. Harford Fire Blog reported that the wires down started a field fire.
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NEWS
January 21, 2004
Charles Wesley Tyson, a retired dairy farm equipment production executive, died of complications from West Nile virus Sunday at his Bel Air home. He was 76, and had contracted the virus in August, his family said. Born in Bel Air, he attended Harford County public schools before joining a family-owned business, Standard Equipment, in 1946. Mr. Tyson was vice president of production for the Bel Air business that produced wrought-iron railings and dairy barn equipment. He also supervised its branches in Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio and Nevada before the business ceased operations in 1984.
NEWS
Tim Wheeler | February 12, 2013
Farmers and others upset over state-imposed restrictions on septic-based rural development staged a "tractorcade" Tuesday past the State House in Annapolis. The protest comes on the day the Senate Education, Health and Environmental Affairs Committee is scheduled to hear a bill, SB391 , which would repeal the Sustainable Growth and Agricultural Preservation Act of 2012 . The law, introduced by Gov. Martin O'Malley and passed last year over rural lawmakers' objections, restricts large-scale housing development that would rely on septic systems.
NEWS
October 31, 2003
Edgar C. Hough Jr., a retired lumberyard worker who collected antique toys and vintage farm equipment, died of pneumonia Tuesday at Westminster Nursing and Rehabilitative Center. The New Windsor resident was 85. Mr. Hough was born and raised on his family's farm in Carroll County's Bark Hill Village. After graduation from the old Elmer Wolfe High School, he worked as a farmhand for several area dairy farms. He was employed for many years at Arnold's Lumber Yard in Westminster until retiring about 20 years ago. Mr. Hough retained a lifelong interest in farm machinery and had assembled a collection of tractors from 1918 to the 1930s.
NEWS
September 29, 2002
The Carroll County Farm Museum's annual Fall Harvest Days event is scheduled for 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Oct. 6. This event offers traditional autumn activities, such as stuffing a life-size scarecrow and mule- and tractor-pulled wagon rides, apple butter-making and children's games. The Mason-Dixon Historical Society will demonstrate shelling and threshing with old-time steam engines. The festival also features guided farmhouse tours and the Living History Center and exhibit buildings.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,Staff writer | September 15, 1991
Do you treat your lawn mower or tractor with proper respect?It may seem an odd question, but Harford farming and lawn equipment experts say that a little respect, and basic common sense, could prevent many of the equipment-related injuries that occur each year."
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | January 15, 2001
Drawing on its experience teaching children spinning, broom making and other traditional arts, Carroll County Farm Museum hopes to develop a rural heritage program for county students that would allow them to experience what farm life was like a century ago. "We are an educational facility. Our mission is to teach people about Carroll's rural heritage," museum Administrator Dottie Freeman said. "For years, it has been my dream, my goal, to have children spend a day at the museum and learn through first-hand experience what is was like to live on a farm in the 1800s."
NEWS
April 22, 1994
It's a sure sign of rampant suburban and exurban sprawl when government has to pass a law protecting farmers from nuisance suits filed by their indignant citified neighbors.This month, Harford County became the latest jurisdiction to pass right-to-farm legislation, defending the farmer's right to operate machinery at any time and to work his fields according to accepted agricultural practices.The noise of farm equipment and livestock in the middle of the night, the smell of manure, the menacing clouds of pesticide sprays -- these are increasingly common complaints of newcomers to the countryside who are not, and have never been, involved with agrarian production.
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 3, 1996
ONCE A YEAR the Mason-Dixon Historical Society Inc. offers young and old a chance to learn about our past with its Steam and Gas Roundup, an event that showcases antique farm equipment and machinery.Have your children ever seen a horse pull a plow? At the Roundup, held at the Carroll County Farm Museum, they can see the progress we've made from horse power to steam power to gas engines.Last year, 212 gas engines registered for the show. This year Shane Ey will return with his 1933 Ford truck.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2012
Residents and farmers in western Howard County sparred Thursday night over whether three farm families should be allowed to reclaim the development rights on their farmland - the first-ever attempt to defect from Maryland's agricultural land-preservation program. More than 100 people turned out for the hearing at the Howard County fairgrounds in West Friendship on the request by Steve, Mike and Mark Mullinix to withdraw their 490 acres from Maryland's program, which they had entered 28 years ago. The state paid $450,000 for an easement barring development - though owners who sold development rights before 2004 retain the right to ask out after 25 years if they can show that farming is no longer profitable.
NEWS
By Meg Tully, For The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
It was the first time Kai D'Angelo had ever picked a pumpkin, and the 4-year-old knew just what he was looking for. As he ran to hop onto a cow train ride at Clark's Elioak Farm in Ellicott City this week, he said his pumpkin would be a small one, and orange. Kai and his father planned to carve the pumpkin into a jack-o'-lantern for the front porch of their Columbia house. His mother said she was happy they had something fun to do together as they roamed over the farm. "He is fascinated with tractors and farms and farm equipment," said Jennifer D'Angelo.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2012
Drive west on Mile Lane in Allegany County, then crest the ridge in the road, and all of a sudden, the big barn on Leaning Pine Farm bursts out of the surrounding countryside like a display of fireworks. Eight-sided stars wheel exuberantly against the weathered boards in hues reflecting the natural surroundings: water blue and grass green, sunset orange and the brown of turned furrows. Passing motorists honk or slow down. A few get out to chat with artist Bill Dunlap, who is about a third of the way through a project to paint a large-scale mural on at least one barn in each of the state's 23 counties.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2011
The port of Baltimore, long a source of pollution from ships, trucks and heavy equipment, is starting to clean up. While port businesses and environmentalists often clashed in the past, terminal operators and marine businesses say they are stepping up efforts to minimize the harmful effects of port operations on the air, water and soil. They are working to make everything from cranes to yard equipment to warehouse lighting more efficient and environmentally friendly. "The port is becoming the last line of defense in keeping stuff out of the bay," said Richard L. Sheckells Jr., chief of environmental initiatives for the Maryland Port Administration.
NEWS
January 21, 2004
Charles Wesley Tyson, a retired dairy farm equipment production executive, died of complications from West Nile virus Sunday at his Bel Air home. He was 76, and had contracted the virus in August, his family said. Born in Bel Air, he attended Harford County public schools before joining a family-owned business, Standard Equipment, in 1946. Mr. Tyson was vice president of production for the Bel Air business that produced wrought-iron railings and dairy barn equipment. He also supervised its branches in Missouri, North Carolina, Ohio and Nevada before the business ceased operations in 1984.
NEWS
October 31, 2003
Edgar C. Hough Jr., a retired lumberyard worker who collected antique toys and vintage farm equipment, died of pneumonia Tuesday at Westminster Nursing and Rehabilitative Center. The New Windsor resident was 85. Mr. Hough was born and raised on his family's farm in Carroll County's Bark Hill Village. After graduation from the old Elmer Wolfe High School, he worked as a farmhand for several area dairy farms. He was employed for many years at Arnold's Lumber Yard in Westminster until retiring about 20 years ago. Mr. Hough retained a lifelong interest in farm machinery and had assembled a collection of tractors from 1918 to the 1930s.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 28, 2001
MOLINE, Ill. - Deere & Co. said yesterday that it plans to sell its money-losing Homelite lawn care-products business and reorganize its construction and forestry division to cut about 2,000 jobs, or about 4.6 percent of its payroll. Homelite makes chainsaws, blowers and trimmers. Deere, the biggest farm equipment maker, will try to sell the Homelite operation in Chihuahua, Mexico, which employs 1,200. In Charlotte, N.C., and the South Carolina cities of Greer and Columbia, some or all of the Homelite business will be closed, and 475 jobs lost.
NEWS
April 24, 2014
Local police were kept busy Thursday evening and into the night with several accidents, though none was serious, they said. The first happened around 5 p.m. on Aldino Road near Mahan Road in Churchville, according to Cpl. Monk of the Maryland State Police Bel Air Barrack. A large piece of farm equipment took out a phone pole along the road, he said. Aldino Road was closed for a short period of time, he said, and BGE was called. Harford Fire Blog reported that the wires down started a field fire.
NEWS
September 29, 2002
The Carroll County Farm Museum's annual Fall Harvest Days event is scheduled for 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Oct. 6. This event offers traditional autumn activities, such as stuffing a life-size scarecrow and mule- and tractor-pulled wagon rides, apple butter-making and children's games. The Mason-Dixon Historical Society will demonstrate shelling and threshing with old-time steam engines. The festival also features guided farmhouse tours and the Living History Center and exhibit buildings.
BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 28, 2001
MOLINE, Ill. - Deere & Co. said yesterday that it plans to sell its money-losing Homelite lawn care-products business and reorganize its construction and forestry division to cut about 2,000 jobs, or about 4.6 percent of its payroll. Homelite makes chainsaws, blowers and trimmers. Deere, the biggest farm equipment maker, will try to sell the Homelite operation in Chihuahua, Mexico, which employs 1,200. In Charlotte, N.C., and the South Carolina cities of Greer and Columbia, some or all of the Homelite business will be closed, and 475 jobs lost.
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