Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFarm Animals
IN THE NEWS

Farm Animals

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Ted Shelsby | October 15, 2006
As rescue workers saw during Hurricane Katrina, the bond between people and their pets can be a powerful one. In many cases, people refused to be rescued from their homes and taken out of harm's way if it meant leaving their cat, dog or herd of farm animals behind. Avoiding that scenario in the future was the impetus behind federal legislation signed this month by President Bush requiring states to establish plans for the evacuation of pets and farm animals as part of their emergency response procedures.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
December 12, 2013
The rise of drug-resistant bacteria is one of the more alarming health threats of the past several decades. Some of the nation's top hospitals, including one operated by the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, have experienced deadly outbreaks. Altogether, such infections kill an estimated 23,000 Americans each year, which is more than die of leukemia, Parkinson's disease or HIV/AIDS, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. One factor thought to be contributing to the deadly trend is the use of antibiotics in farm animals.
Advertisement
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | November 18, 2005
You say the cat's gone missing, and your nights are haunted by eerie yips and howls? Could be coyotes, pardner. Eastern coyotes - descendants of familiar Western varmints who picked up some weight and wolf genes on their century-long trot eastward - have become a growing nuisance in Maryland. Truth be told, coyotes have been here for more than two decades. But their range and numbers are increasing. They're active in every Maryland county now, especially Washington's suburbs. They've settled Rock Creek National Park and roam nearby streets in the capital itself.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | November 19, 2013
More than four years after Maryland first moved to regulate its largest poultry and livestock farms, nearly 30 percent, or 169 operations, still do not have required state permits mandating measures to control polluted runoff from their chicken houses or feedlots. An environmental watchdog group, the Center for Progressive Reform, contends the state is lagging in protecting the Chesapeake Bay from pollution from such large-scale farms. The Washington-based center said in a new report that the state's regulatory effort is hampered by a lack of staff and skimpy inspections.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | July 23, 1995
Within the next week, please send old photos of kids with farm animals to Way Back When, Sun Magazine, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimoire, Md. 21278. You must include caption information and your daytime phone number. Also, enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope if you'd like your photo returned. If your photo is your only copy, please send a good-quality duplicate, not the origional. No faxes or newspaper clippings, please.
NEWS
By Lisa Respers and Lisa Respers,SUN STAFF | November 4, 1998
It's a jungle out there in Harford County.The rolling hills usually reserved for cows and sheep are home to exotic animals such as zebras, llamas and bison -- some as pets, others as part of an evolving agricultural community struggling to hang on amid housing developments and businesses."
FEATURES
May 26, 1991
The Carroll County Farm Museum in Westminster will be the site of the annual Antique/Craft Fair and Farm Show next Sunday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.Attractions will include farm animals, exhibits of farm equipment and machinery and demonstrations of sheep shearing and goat milking, 180 antique and craft dealers , Square dancers and country music groups. Country food, including fried chicken, fresh lemonade, will be on sale. There will also be tours of the farmhouse conducted by costumed guides and traditional craft demonstrations.
NEWS
September 30, 2013
Looking through my calendar of national observances, it appears that October is turning into "food month," beginning with World Vegetarian Day and World Day for Farm Animals Oct. 1-2, continuing with National School Lunch Week, Oct. 14-18 and World Food Day on Oct. 16, and culminating with Food Day, Oct. 24. World Day for Farm Animals Day (www.WFAD.org), on Oct. 2, is perhaps the most dramatic of these. It celebrates the lives, exposes the abuses, and memorializes the slaughter of billions of sentient animals raised for food.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | August 4, 2006
Barnyard stars a bunch of farm animals that look like those cheap plastic toys you can buy for a buck at any neighborhood convenience store, trinkets that will at least keep the kids amused for a few minutes. How appropriate, for that's about the best that can be said about this movie. It includes a few moments that might make the kids chuckle, but, for the most part, it's uninspired, not much to look at and laugh-free - as though the creators dreamed up the film's tagline, "The original party animals," and figured that was enough.
NEWS
October 8, 2013
Susan Reimer 's column regarding the National Football League ( "The moral consequences of watching football," Oct. 7) made a lot of sense, as usual, until she compared the plight of farm animals with that of professional football players. Football players are willing volunteers to play a violent game, eager to do what they do for their salaries. Animals, completely innocent and at the mercy of humans, are forced to live a life of pure hell on factory farms until the day they are slaughtered.
NEWS
October 8, 2013
Susan Reimer 's column regarding the National Football League ( "The moral consequences of watching football," Oct. 7) made a lot of sense, as usual, until she compared the plight of farm animals with that of professional football players. Football players are willing volunteers to play a violent game, eager to do what they do for their salaries. Animals, completely innocent and at the mercy of humans, are forced to live a life of pure hell on factory farms until the day they are slaughtered.
NEWS
September 30, 2013
Looking through my calendar of national observances, it appears that October is turning into "food month," beginning with World Vegetarian Day and World Day for Farm Animals Oct. 1-2, continuing with National School Lunch Week, Oct. 14-18 and World Food Day on Oct. 16, and culminating with Food Day, Oct. 24. World Day for Farm Animals Day (www.WFAD.org), on Oct. 2, is perhaps the most dramatic of these. It celebrates the lives, exposes the abuses, and memorializes the slaughter of billions of sentient animals raised for food.
FEATURES
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | December 22, 2012
Jenny stepped quickly off the trailer into her new home, striding over to Jack, who seemed interested in the fresh arrival. The two donkeys leaned their gray faces toward each other for an instant, then Jack followed her around a bit before Jenny trotted off, exploring the far ends of her fenced pasture. The gray-and-white Jerusalem donkey became the 18th livestock resident of the new Burleigh Manor Animal Sanctuary and Eco Retreat in Ellicott City, but that's if you don't count the tabby cat, Barnie.
NEWS
By Gerald Winegrad | February 20, 2012
Millions of tons of one of theChesapeake Bay'slargest sources of pollution continue to be dumped onto farm lands without proper regulation. Farm animals produce 44 million tons of manure annually in the bay watershed, and most of it is collected and disposed of on farmland - or left where it falls. This ranks the bay region in the top 10 percent in the nation for manure-related nitrogen runoff, and the problem of proper management of this waste is exacerbated by the fact that three highly concentrated animal feeding operation areas contribute more than 90 percent of the manure.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | February 19, 2012
One day last winter the Balunsats carried home a gangly baby goat. They named the fuzzy thing Snowbird, cradled her while she slurped a bottle and allowed her inside to snuggle under a heat lamp. With Chesapeake City grass, hay and the occasional potato chip, Snowbird filled out into a handsome animal with a thick white coat, ridged horns that curl between her ears and lips that seem ever-pursed in an ironic smile. When she bleats "Meh, meh, meh," Lisa Balunsat - who will tell anyone she raised that goat as a child - hears, "Ma, Ma, Ma. " Cecil County officials mainly hear a zoning violation.
FEATURES
By Jill Rosen and The Baltimore Sun | January 14, 2012
Is anyone in Anne Arundel County -- or anywhere -- missing a goat? A female in very poor condition that's being called Tuscany was found wandering near Linthicum on Thursday and county officials are trying to find out who she belongs to and how she got there. Animal Control responded to a call on Friday after an 11-year-old found Tuscany on River Road in northern Linthicum. The goat had a chain weighing more than 23 pounds hanging from her neck. Though the chain wasn't tight, it was so heavy that it had become embedded in the goat's neck.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | November 26, 1993
A bitter neighborhood battle over Donald Parlett's pig farm on Bird River will not spawn a new Baltimore County law regulating farm animals.Councilman Vincent J. Gardina, D-5th, had planned to introduce legislation requiring anyone keeping large farm animals in rural waterfront areas to obtain a special zoning exception. But he gave up on the plan because he could not get any support on the council.That was a relief to the county's farmers, but not for most residents of Earls Beach, a tiny waterfront community in the eastern part of the county that is embroiled in a long-standing fight with Mr. Parlett over the use of his 72-acre farm.
NEWS
September 21, 1993
Anne Arundel has become an increasingly urban place over the past two generations, which may explain why its annual farm fair receives less fanfare than those in counties such as Carroll and Frederick. Nonetheless, the 41st edition of the fair, which ended last weekend, was evidence that county residents continue to value their agricultural heritage.Though the Anne Arundel fair boasts rides and a midway, its main draw remains the agricultural exposition itself -- the hundreds of sewing, canning, baking and craft projects, farm animals and picture-perfect garden vegetables.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2011
With the weather leapfrogging fall's cheerful chill to winter's blustery bite, the warmest person at the Howard County Conservancy's fall festival Saturday was iron man Allen Dyer. The light from a brilliant fire illuminated the Ellicott City blacksmith, who pumped a huge bellows that fed the dancing flames. Then he spun a thin metal bar in his hands as he heated it until it glowed red. A rapt audience watched Dyer as he transformed the iron into a curved workshop tool, hammering, heating and hammering again until, satisfied, he dipped it into a bucket of water.
EXPLORE
By Lindsey McPherson | August 30, 2011
Stop. Unplug. Go outside. A welcome escape from our increasingly digital world is just that easy. Reconnecting with nature could mean sinking your fingers into the soil, going “off the grid” deep in the forest or galaxy-gazing. All this and more is right in your backyard in Howard County - from the parks and lakes to working farms and nature-oriented clubs - making it easy to see just what's so great about the great outdoors. 1. Robinson Nature Center The newest environmental attraction in Howard County is the Robinson Nature Center.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.