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Farm Aid

NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | May 20, 2007
For decades, the specter of the infamously powerful farm lobby has loomed over an ongoing debate about the future of American agriculture. While the farms that supply the food we eat have grown larger, more efficient and more distant from the consumers they serve, smaller family farms closer to home have found it more difficult to compete and easier to sell their land for residential development and other uses. Most federal agricultural aid tends to go to the larger producers, while the smaller farms struggle.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2012
When a deadly earthquake struck Haiti in 2010, and Hurricane Katrina hit Louisiana seven years ago, humans weren't the only creatures in distress. Countless horses and other animals also needed help, and emergency teams from the Woodbine-based Days End Farm Horse Rescue came to their aid. The 58-acre farm in Woodbine, established in 1989, has carved out an international reputation for its work training first responders, animal control officers,...
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 3, 1994
Federal investigators have uncovered far-reaching fraud and mismanagement in the Agriculture Department aid program that provides billions of dollars to farmers who suffer crop losses in disasters such as the Midwest floods of 1993 and Hurricane Andrew in 1992.Many farmers have collected excessive payments by inflating crop losses, misstating the acreage they planted or failing to harvest crops when market prices fell below the amount paid in disaster assistance, according to sweeping new reports by the Agriculture Department and Senate investigators.
NEWS
By Tim Baker | October 16, 2001
IN THIS hour of national crisis, America's true-blue farmers have stepped forward to defend our country from terrorism and economic collapse. To help preserve our way of life, their lobbyists and allies in Congress are pushing the Farm Security Act. That's what they renamed the agricultural subsidy bill after Sept. 11. The House passed the legislation 291-120 Oct. 5. It budgets $170 billion for farm subsidies over the next 10 years - a $73 billion increase in payments to farmers and other agricultural interests.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,U.S. Department of Agriculture's Maryland Emergency BoardStaff Writer | August 18, 1993
The summer drought -- one of the worst some Maryland farmers can remember -- is almost certain to bring federal disaster relief to the entire state, the head of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Maryland Emergency Board said yesterday.The hot, dry summer has destroyed $50 million in corn and soybean crops, state agriculture officials estimate. And it could lead to higher grocery prices for chicken. Most Maryland-grown grain is used by the Eastern Shore's poultry industry."Quite frankly, this is the worst drought I've ever seen," said 60-year-old James M. Voss, executive director of the Maryland Agricultural Stabilization Conservation Service office in Columbia and chairman of the emergency board.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 9, 2002
WASHINGTON - Driven by election-year fervor, the Senate gave final approval yesterday to an agriculture bill that guarantees farmers a predictable flow of taxpayer-subsidized income for the next six years. The bill marks a reversal from the current U.S. farm law, enacted in 1996, which was intended to wean farmers from dependence on federal crop subsidies. But the measure's political appeal was potent in a year when several of its chief advocates, who represent farm states, face tough re-election races.
FEATURES
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | October 17, 2005
Inside an Eastern Shore greenhouse the size of a football field, a chop saw shrieks discordantly as it slices miles of metal guttering into portable lengths. All 50,000 feet of the metal trough is being moved, truckload by truckload, to a new home, so that innovative farmer David Lankford can continue to grow the lush herbs, fruits and vegetables he supplies to numerous choice restaurants. The crews that have spent the last several weekends doing this dirty work at Lankford's Hurlock farm might be called a Save the Baby Peas Corps.
NEWS
June 17, 1994
The William Snyder Foundation for Animals in Baltimore, formerly the Foundation for Animal Information, has awarded $5,000 to Days End Farm Horse Rescue, Inc. in Mount Airy to help the farm aid abused and neglected horses.Last year, the foundation helped the farm establish a critical care unit to treat serious cases of horse abuse.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | October 9, 1996
Fill the year with pastaDecember is fettucia riccia, "curly ribbons," March is green nidi verdi, June honors wedding season with anelli, pasta rings -- those and nine others are among the goodies packed in a La Pace Imports Pasta-of-the-Month Club. December offers pasta, bread sticks, tomato sauce and a copy of "The Pasta Book," by Julia della Croce. After that, packages bring four pounds of pasta every month. A subscription or gift costs $149. Call (800) 44-PASTA."Fresh from the Family Farm" is the title of a new video for kids ages 3 to 10 that shows where food comes from and how it is grown.
NEWS
February 8, 2005
DESPERATE TIMES call for desperate measures, which may explain why President Bush seems to have turned on his rural, red-state supporters, proposing to slash farm aid in his drive to shrink the gaping federal budget deficit. No matter what his motives, though, cracking down on the much-abused agriculture subsidy program is a very good idea. Critics are already complaining that the president has launched a frontal assault on that most sacred of cows - the family farm. But Mr. Bush is actually proposing to do quite the opposite.
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