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By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | April 24, 1993
Cable television's identity as a "narrowcast" medium, with the ability to target its programming to relatively specific audiences, gets a double demonstration this weekend.From 4 p.m. to midnight today, seen live on the Nashville Network of basic cable, top country music figures perform in Ames, Iowa, in "Farm Aid VI." The benefit, co-founded by Willie Nelson, John Mellencamp and Neil Young, raises funds for U.S. farm families.And at noon tomorrow, the ESPN all-sports service plans 6 1/2 hours of live coverage of the annual National Football League draft.
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By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2012
When a deadly earthquake struck Haiti in 2010, and Hurricane Katrina hit Louisiana seven years ago, humans weren't the only creatures in distress. Countless horses and other animals also needed help, and emergency teams from the Woodbine-based Days End Farm Horse Rescue came to their aid. The 58-acre farm in Woodbine, established in 1989, has carved out an international reputation for its work training first responders, animal control officers,...
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 12, 1999
Willie Nelson is tired of Farm Aid.Nor is he the only one. "I think that Neil agrees with me," he says, referring to Farm Aid co-founder Neil Young. "We're sick and tired of Farm Aid. We don't think there should have been the first one, much less that we should have to still be doing it years later."Unfortunately, he can't quit just yet. Because even after 14 years of fund- and consciousness-raising by some of the biggest names in pop music, American farmers are still struggling. So Nelson and Young are gearing up for Farm Aid 15, which takes place today at the Nissan Pavilion in Bristow, Va.Inspired by an offhand remark Bob Dylan made at a benefit for African famine victims, Live Aid -- "Wouldn't it be great if we did something for our own farmers right here in America?"
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | May 20, 2007
For decades, the specter of the infamously powerful farm lobby has loomed over an ongoing debate about the future of American agriculture. While the farms that supply the food we eat have grown larger, more efficient and more distant from the consumers they serve, smaller family farms closer to home have found it more difficult to compete and easier to sell their land for residential development and other uses. Most federal agricultural aid tends to go to the larger producers, while the smaller farms struggle.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 15, 2000
Back in the 1980s, pop musicians believed that the best way to save the world - or at least to help solve a specific problem - was to hold a benefit concert. Perhaps the biggest and splashiest was 1985's Live Aid, which found some 1.5 billion people watching concert action broadcast from London and Philadelphia. Things have changed a lot since then. The last attempt to unite the world in song was 1999's Net Aid, which presented concerts on three continents to general indifference. Obviously, the era of the media- saturated mega-benefit is long past.
NEWS
January 17, 1994
Graham urges Japanese to spread the gospelEvangelist Billy Graham told the Japanese their business know-how could help spread Christianity worldwide.The 45,000-strong crowd at the Tokyo Dome on Saturday was a record for a Christian gathering in Japan. More than 36,000 came to see Pope John Paul II in 1981.Mr. Graham, 75, said one reason for coming to Japan was that "you have businessmen all over the world selling Japanese products. You can do the same with the gospel."Former police chief says radio station robbed himCall the police!
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Contributing Writer | December 30, 1993
I'm so tired of writing the word "repeats" when describing the night's TV offerings, my brain is scrambled. Which reminds me: If you scramble the word "repeats," it comes out "see part," or "trap, see?," either of which makes perfect sense.* "The Simpsons." (8-8:30 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- The best scene in tonight's delightful "Simpsons" repeat comes when Homer ends up at the same party as George Harrison, and gets all excited -- but not by Mr. Harrison. David Crosby, as well as Mr. Harrison, supplies his own voice in this wonderful satire, which tells of Homer's days as a barbershop-quartet superstar, and ranks as the best Beatles spoof since "The Rutles."
BUSINESS
August 24, 1993
Delta offers early retirementDelta Air Lines, in the latest of several moves to rebound from a prolonged financial slump, said it was offering early retirement to 3,000 employees.Though the program is expected to save the Atlanta-based airline money in the long run, each worker who accepts the early retirement offer will cost Delta $70,000, the company said yesterday. If all the eligible workers participate, that would amount to $210 million.Prospects good for farm aid to Md.U.S. Secretary of Agriculture Mike Espy said yesterday that Maryland farmers stand a good chance of receiving federal drought relief.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Anne Haddad and Mary Gail Hare and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1999
An ecumenical drought conference today at the Brethren Service Center in New Windsor will focus on how to help farm families in Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia.Agencies, including Farm Aid, Orphan's Grain Train and Church World Services, are joining the Church of the Brethren in the effort, said conference coordinator Stan Noffsinger, manager of the Brethren Center's Emergency Response Services Ministry."People will consider the drought's impact on a heavily populated area with hundreds of family farmers," said Noffsinger.
NEWS
October 30, 2005
Farm subsidies, a mainstay of economic, political and trade policy for generations, might be about to collapse of their own gluttonous weight. The trick will be convincing farm-state lawmakers that most of their constituents as well as the nation will be better served if the agriculture safety net is no longer tied to production but to protecting green space and preserving the family farm as a viable means to make a living. Pressure for change is coming most powerfully from a successful World Trade Organization challenge by Brazil to U.S. cotton subsidies, setting a precedent sure to apply to other commodities.
NEWS
October 30, 2005
Farm subsidies, a mainstay of economic, political and trade policy for generations, might be about to collapse of their own gluttonous weight. The trick will be convincing farm-state lawmakers that most of their constituents as well as the nation will be better served if the agriculture safety net is no longer tied to production but to protecting green space and preserving the family farm as a viable means to make a living. Pressure for change is coming most powerfully from a successful World Trade Organization challenge by Brazil to U.S. cotton subsidies, setting a precedent sure to apply to other commodities.
FEATURES
By STEPHANIE SHAPIRO and STEPHANIE SHAPIRO,SUN REPORTER | October 17, 2005
Inside an Eastern Shore greenhouse the size of a football field, a chop saw shrieks discordantly as it slices miles of metal guttering into portable lengths. All 50,000 feet of the metal trough is being moved, truckload by truckload, to a new home, so that innovative farmer David Lankford can continue to grow the lush herbs, fruits and vegetables he supplies to numerous choice restaurants. The crews that have spent the last several weekends doing this dirty work at Lankford's Hurlock farm might be called a Save the Baby Peas Corps.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 9, 2002
WASHINGTON - Driven by election-year fervor, the Senate gave final approval yesterday to an agriculture bill that guarantees farmers a predictable flow of taxpayer-subsidized income for the next six years. The bill marks a reversal from the current U.S. farm law, enacted in 1996, which was intended to wean farmers from dependence on federal crop subsidies. But the measure's political appeal was potent in a year when several of its chief advocates, who represent farm states, face tough re-election races.
NEWS
By Tim Baker | October 16, 2001
IN THIS hour of national crisis, America's true-blue farmers have stepped forward to defend our country from terrorism and economic collapse. To help preserve our way of life, their lobbyists and allies in Congress are pushing the Farm Security Act. That's what they renamed the agricultural subsidy bill after Sept. 11. The House passed the legislation 291-120 Oct. 5. It budgets $170 billion for farm subsidies over the next 10 years - a $73 billion increase in payments to farmers and other agricultural interests.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 15, 2000
Back in the 1980s, pop musicians believed that the best way to save the world - or at least to help solve a specific problem - was to hold a benefit concert. Perhaps the biggest and splashiest was 1985's Live Aid, which found some 1.5 billion people watching concert action broadcast from London and Philadelphia. Things have changed a lot since then. The last attempt to unite the world in song was 1999's Net Aid, which presented concerts on three continents to general indifference. Obviously, the era of the media- saturated mega-benefit is long past.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | September 12, 1999
Willie Nelson is tired of Farm Aid.Nor is he the only one. "I think that Neil agrees with me," he says, referring to Farm Aid co-founder Neil Young. "We're sick and tired of Farm Aid. We don't think there should have been the first one, much less that we should have to still be doing it years later."Unfortunately, he can't quit just yet. Because even after 14 years of fund- and consciousness-raising by some of the biggest names in pop music, American farmers are still struggling. So Nelson and Young are gearing up for Farm Aid 15, which takes place today at the Nissan Pavilion in Bristow, Va.Inspired by an offhand remark Bob Dylan made at a benefit for African famine victims, Live Aid -- "Wouldn't it be great if we did something for our own farmers right here in America?"
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1998
The U.S. Department of Agriculture released its latest forecasts on the fall harvest yesterday, and there was nothing comforting in the numbers for Maryland grain farmers suffering through a second consecutive year of serious drought."
FEATURES
By Dan DeLuca and Dan DeLuca,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 13, 1995
It was the biggest charity event ever, and certainly history's most outsized rock concert.On July 13, 1985 -- 10 years ago tomorrow -- 90,000 people at JFK Stadium in South Philadelphia and 72,000 more at Wembley Stadium in London were eyewitnesses to Live Aid, the African hunger-relief benefit seen by an additional 1.5 billion television viewers in 160 countries.The philanthropic effort -- initiated by Irish musician Bob Geldof, who wrote the all-star Band-Aid single "Do They Know It's Christmas?"
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Anne Haddad and Mary Gail Hare and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | August 26, 1999
An ecumenical drought conference today at the Brethren Service Center in New Windsor will focus on how to help farm families in Maryland, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia.Agencies, including Farm Aid, Orphan's Grain Train and Church World Services, are joining the Church of the Brethren in the effort, said conference coordinator Stan Noffsinger, manager of the Brethren Center's Emergency Response Services Ministry."People will consider the drought's impact on a heavily populated area with hundreds of family farmers," said Noffsinger.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 10, 1998
The U.S. Department of Agriculture released its latest forecasts on the fall harvest yesterday, and there was nothing comforting in the numbers for Maryland grain farmers suffering through a second consecutive year of serious drought."
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