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NEWS
September 7, 2011
Most people are aware that college football and basketball players are a major part of the professional farm system for those sports. To allow athletes to participate on a college team without being enrolled full-time academically would create multiple unforeseen problems, in my opinion. I realize there are some semi-pro football teams, but I think it would be better to develop a farm system to enable high school graduates who cannot qualify academically or simply want to enhance their athletic abilities by participating in a professional program that would hone their skills and provide a modest income.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | October 12, 2014
Sidney Anne Willson, a stellar multisport athlete who went on to help her son run a horse-breeding farm in Howard County, died in her sleep Tuesday of natural causes at Shady Grove Center in Rockville. She was 87. In addition to tennis, a sport in which she won tournaments all along the East Coast during the 1940s and 1950s, the former Sidney Adams played lacrosse and, after taking it up in middle age, excelled in golf. "I have never beaten her in golf my entire life," said her son, Art Willson, of Woodbine.
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NEWS
May 6, 2010
Fire officials say a blaze has destroyed several apartments at a congressman's farm in Frederick. The blaze at U.S. Rep. Roscoe Bartlett's farm was reported about 2:05 p.m. Thursday. Frederick County Emergency Services spokesman Michael Dmuchowski says a few residents of the apartments suffered minor injuries, but none was taken to the hospital. Dmuchowski says 14 apartments were affected in a converted barn and silo. Numerous residents were displaced. Bartlett's spokeswoman says the congressman was in Washington when the fire broke out. The cause of the blaze is under investigation.
NEWS
By Peter Crispino and For The Baltimore Sun | October 5, 2014
Two new synthetic turf fields unveiled this week at Kinder Farm Park will transform the Millersvillle facility into the new home of Severna Park High School athletics - at least for the foreseeable future. Community leaders, school officials and student athletes gathered at the complex Monday to dedicate the fields, which along with four additional grass surfaces will accommodate many of the Falcons' fall and spring sports teams while construction is underway on the new Severna Park High School.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2013
At Maggie's Farm, on a late December night, the small, square Harford Road dining room was full, with couples and foursomes along the edges, and in the middle, two separate large parties, of 12 and 18, celebrating birthdays. We were concerned about our own good time. Are these people going to get loud? Can I get my order in before they do? There was no need to worry, not at Maggie's Farm, which serves up big flavors with a mellow attitude and makes the hard work of preparing and serving good food feel effortless.
NEWS
February 24, 2013
After a lifetime in Maryland, my husband and I have come to the conclusion to put our farm on the market. Due to the burden of new regulations and the financial burden of higher taxes, we can no longer afford to live in this state. While lawmakers in Annapolis struggle to pay for their excessive spending while furthering their own political agendas, we are the ones being penalized. Whether it be higher taxes on gasoline, higher costs to citizens in order to facilitate illegal immigration, speed-camera rip-offs or new fines and penalties for lawful firearms ownership, we are watching our income dwindle.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 7, 2013
Baltimore's own Maggie's Farm will be featured on tonight's night's episode of  "Restaurant Divided," a new Food Network show hosted by Rocco DiSpirito .  The episode premieres at 10 p.m. on the Food Network. The show, which debuted in September, is a variation of the popular reality-show concept in which an expert or team of experts swoops in to help a struggling business. In "Restaurant Divided," the restaurant is literally divided into side-by-side concepts, which are judged by what publicity materials describe as "real customers and real critics.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2012
Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said one of his aims during the legislative session that starts this week is to trim Maryland's estate tax where it applies to the inheritance of family farms. Miller, a Calvert County Democrat, said that too often the heirs to family farms are forced to sell property for development because they can't afford the estate taxes. He said he'd like to get rid of the tax entirely when a parcel stays in farming and in the family but recapture the revenue if the inherited property if ever sold off for development.
NEWS
By Carly Simon | March 22, 2000
Editor's note: Songwriter Carly Simon has written several children's books, including these verses about a magical farm that comes alive with music at midnight. One night in July We woke to hoots and howls -- It sounded nothing like a nightingale Nothing like an owl. We looked out the window And the sea was very calm But the joint was jumping On our Martha's Vineyard farm. Just when you'd expect Every living thing to doze Vegetables and flowers Were putting on their clothes.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2011
Robert and Maxine Walker are hoping for county approval allowing them to hold social events at their Woodbine farm, despite neighbors' opposition at two hearings this month that further delayed a ruling by the county's Board of Appeals. Back in 2009, the Walkers asked the county for permission to open an antiques store and rent out a portion of the property for private events for up to 150 people, but several neighbors fought back over concerns about noise, to increased traffic, possible drunk drivers and worries over a business operating in a agricultural area.
NEWS
By Janene Holzberg and The Baltimore Sun | October 4, 2014
On an unseasonably warm opening weekend, several visitors exited the 7-acre corn maze at Sharp's at Waterford Farm huffing and puffing, and a tad overheated. The 8-foot-tall withered cornstalks that wall in the maze's twisting pathway were the likely culprit, blocking breezes that could have offset the afternoon sun, surmised farm manager Cheryl Nodar. "The people who walk through on our first weekend are always the guinea pigs," she said. "I ask them how it went to be sure it's a good experience, and we're getting great feedback so far. " The corn maze, which debuted in 2002, is an agritourism feature that has helped attract thousands of visitors over the years to the working Glenwood farm, which dates to 1903.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
Prime pieces of farmland like this one on the auction block in northern Baltimore County are few and far between. Ideally situated among the rolling hills of Maryland's horse country, 4101 Butler Road in Glyndon is a 189-acre, horseshoe-shaped estate adjacent to Sagamore Farm, the well-known thoroughbred horse breeding center. A completely renovated, 304-year-old farmhouse, with three bedrooms and three bathrooms, is nestled on the property. The current owners farm out portions of the land for soybean and hay. There is also a one-bedroom cottage on a 1-plus-acre building site.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake says she is throwing her support behind City Councilman William "Pete" Welch's bill calling for a large tax break for urban farmers in Baltimore. In legislation pending in a City Council committee, Welch is seeking a 90 percent break on property taxes for urban farmers who grow and sell at least $5,000 of fruit and vegetables a year. The credits, which must be approved by the city's Cffice of Sustainability, are good for five years, but can be renewed for a total of 10 years, according to the bill.
NEWS
By Matthew Wellington and Robert S. Lawrence | October 1, 2014
Science tells us that the overuse of antibiotics is leading to "super bugs," bacteria that are increasingly difficult if not impossible to kill with antibiotics. The biggest users — and arguably abusers — of antibiotics are large-scale industrial farms. More than 70 percent of antibiotics are used on livestock and poultry, and at many facilities, antibiotics are fed to animals that aren't sick. This enables the animals to grow faster and lets them stay healthy despite cramped, confined quarters where bacteria abound.
FEATURES
By Audrey A. Cockrum, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
The Friends of Great Kids Farm will host their Second Annual Fall Food and Jazz Festival on Oct. 11. The event will serve locally sourced food, wine and beer accompanied by the music of the Dunbar High School Jazz Band. The festival will also feature a culinary competition among City Schools' rising chefs. Celebrity judges will award prizes for the best dish. “Each of the five high school culinary training programs will be preparing a signature dish - featuring produce from the Farm - in partnership with a local restaurant,” said Chrissa Carlson, Friends of Great Kids Farm executive director.
NEWS
September 22, 2014
Last week, Jim Perdue spoke at a Maryland Chamber of Commerce event to complain about the regulatory environment in the state where his company roosts. "The problem is, we have no seat at the table in Maryland," the Perdue Farms chairman said, according to the Baltimore Business Journal. "Even if we have an onerous thing that happens in Virginia or Delaware, we can sit at the table and at least express our opinion. " Wow. Just wow. No doubt there are a lot of corporate CEOs out there who are nodding their heads in agreement at Mr. Perdue's chirping.
NEWS
October 3, 2002
Howard County's farming past was in the spotlight last weekend at Mount Pleasant Farm in Woodstock with the seventh annual Farm Heritage Days sponsored the Howard County Antique Farm Machinery Club.
NEWS
September 28, 2007
TODAY THROUGH SUNDAY Farm Heritage Days Howard County Living Farm Heritage Museum, 12985 Frederick Road, West Friendship, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. each day. $5 admission for ages 12 and older. www.farmheritage.org TOMORROW Healthy Howard Family Walk Howard County Health Department at Clark's Elioak Farm, 10500 Route 108, Ellicott City, 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. 410-730-4049 Fall Festival Days End Farm Horse Rescue, 15856 Frederick Road, Woodbine, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., small admission fee. 301-854-5037, or www.defhr.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman and The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2014
Royal Farms quietly grew over decades into one of Baltimore's most ubiquitous businesses, but last week the convenience store chain took a bigger stage. On Wednesday, the city approved a $1.25 million, five-year agreement for Royal Farms to serve as title sponsor for the Baltimore Arena, to be known starting Nov. 1 as Royal Farms Arena. The move, which comes in the midst of accelerated expansion and after years of careful branding, is a statement of bigger ambitions that simultaneously ties the retailer, headquartered in offices above one of its stores on The Avenue in Hampden, more closely to its local customers, industry watchers said "By having an arena that carries your name, you're saying, 'Not only are we the corner store, but we're the corner store in your community,' " said Jeff Lenard, vice president of strategic industry initiatives for the National Association of Convenience Stores.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Baltimore's spending panel voted unanimously Wednesday to change the Baltimore Arena's name to the Royal Farms Arena in exchange for about $1.2 million over five years. Under the terms of the agreement, the Baltimore-based convenience store chain — which is perhaps best known for its Western fries and fried chicken — would pay $250,000 annually to the city annually for five years. The deal would roughly triple the amount received by the city for the title sponsorship when it was known as 1st Mariner Arena . That agreement, approved in 2002, netted the city $75,000 a year before it expired at the end of 2012.
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