Advertisement
HomeCollectionsFaris
IN THE NEWS

Faris

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Michael Stroh and Michael Stroh,SUN STAFF | September 16, 2002
Faris Beehler Stuntz, whose Baltimore family founded the country's first umbrella factory, died Tuesday at Johns Hopkins Hospital of complications from arthritis. She was 90 and lived in Highfield House Condominium on North Charles Street. Mrs. Stuntz's great-grandfather, an immigrant from Heidelberg, Germany, established Beehler Umbrellas Inc. in Baltimore in 1828. The company, which closed its doors in 1977, is considered to be the first umbrella manufacturer in the United States. Hand-carved wooden handles and other company relics remain on display in the city's Museum of Industry.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | May 19, 2011
Francis Xavier Faris, former head of the procurement division at Philadelphia's Frankford Arsenal, died Monday of heart failure at Anne Arundel Medical Center in Annapolis. The Severna Park resident was 92. The son of a plumber and a housekeeper, Mr. Faris was born and raised in Philadelphia. He was a 1936 graduate of South Catholic High School. During World War II, he served with an ordnance unit at Aberdeen Proving Ground until being discharged in 1946. He was recalled to active duty during the Korean conflict, where he served as a personnel technician.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 23, 2005
Anna Faris is shamelessly hilarious as a vainglorious pop idol in Just Friends, channeling every blond pop tart who ever flounced her way into the modern pop consciousness (Britney, Christina, Jessica ... you know who you are). Ever-whining, ever-tawdry, her mind (what there is of it) firmly lodged in the gutter, Faris' Samantha James is a comic creation of manic beauty. She struts, she pouts, she preens, she shouts. When she's onscreen, Just Friends is as funny as anything to appear in theaters in 2005.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
Anna Faris is happy making people laugh. Three years ago, the Baltimore native, who moved with her family to Seattle at age 5, was considering a biopic of adult film actress Linda Lovelace. With small parts in two acclaimed dramas under her belt ("Lost In Translation" and "Brokeback Mountain"), Faris was ready to give drama a try. But since then, Lindsay Lohan got attached to the project Faris was considering (she's no longer connected, with Malin Ackerman now the leading contender for the role)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | October 29, 2003
ALEXANDRIA, Va. - An Ohio truck driver was sentenced to 20 years in prison yesterday for providing support to al-Qaida and helping the terrorist network plot a second wave of attacks against the United States. U.S. District Judge Leonie Brinkema made the decision after rejecting an effort by the defendant, 34-year-old Iyman Faris, to withdraw a guilty plea he made earlier this year in an agreement with the government. Writing a book Faris, a U.S. citizen and independent truck driver in Columbus, Ohio, claimed that his confession and guilty plea were based on lies he told government investigators to ingratiate himself with the FBI because he wanted to write a book.
NEWS
By Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan and Cheryl Lu-Lien Tan,SUN STAFF | May 3, 2000
From his home and tavern just off Church Circle in Annapolis, silversmith William Faris quietly observed life in the 18th-century town and dutifully jotted down notes every day. A cloudey drissely dissagreeable day, he inked in a haphazard, spidery script fraught with misspellings. Or, Lent my Pistoles and Holsters to Jesse DuWees, who is going to Baltimore to defend him self as thare is Highway men on the road. Over the last 12 years and eight months of his life -- from Jan. 1, 1792, to Aug. 9, 1804 -- Faris scrawled many everyday observations into a brown, muslin-bound book.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 20, 2003
WASHINGTON - Federal law enforcement officials said yesterday that they had uncovered a plot by al-Qaida operatives, using an Ohio truck driver as a scout, to destroy the Brooklyn Bridge and other targets as recently as March. The truck driver, a 34-year-old naturalized American citizen from Kashmir named Iyman Faris, was secretly apprehended about three months ago and agreed to plead guilty in May in closed proceedings before a federal judge in Virginia to charges that he had provided material support to terrorists.
NEWS
August 12, 2007
On Thursday, August 9, 2007, ALFRED WOODS, Beloved husband of Alice Woods (nee Bondy), loving father of Diane Hall, Robert Woods, Ruth Faris, all of Baltimore and David Woods of Virginia, loving father-in-law of Robert Roche, Patricia Woods, and Stacie Woods, devoted brother of the late Frances Sapphire and Irene Russell, beloved grandfather of Cheryl and Matthew Meyer, Michael Hall, Paul Faris, Harrison, Julia, and Austin Woods. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Rd at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Sunday, August 12 at 9am, interment Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery-Berrymans Lane, Please omit flowers, contributions in his memory may be made to Jewish Family Services, 5750 Park Heights Ave, Baltimore, MD (21215)
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE COLUMNIST | August 11, 2006
WASHINGTON--Critics usually view MTV as the scourge of movies because its influence has spread flashy editing and splashy colors for their own sake and a reckless disregard for lucid and cohesive storytelling. But Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris, who came to MTV in the early 1980s, when they were fresh out of UCLA and the music channel was just getting rolling, represent MTV at its best and brightest. In 1983, they saw the chance to do The Cutting Edge, an interview and documentary-based MTV series, as a grand experimental opportunity, and then moved on to craft videos that explored with sympathy, nuance and imagination the visual components of performance.
SPORTS
By Rick Belz and Rick Belz,SUN STAFF | March 29, 2000
Rainy conditions made for a sloppy game, but Glenelg's players were pleased with a 7-5 boys lacrosse victory over visiting North Carroll yesterday. "North Carroll is a much-improved team with a good goalkeeper," Glenelg coach Rick Kincaid said. Kincaid said Glenelg's slightly superior stickwork and solid defense provided the winning edge. The Gladiators improved their record to 2-0 while North Carroll dropped to 1-1. "At the beginning of the season, we were worried about our defense because we lost so much, but it is playing well," Kincaid said.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,sam.sessa@baltsun.com | June 25, 2009
What a difference a year makes. Last summer, the two-day Virgin Mobile Festival boasted top-tier names like Kanye West, Jack Johnson, Bob Dylan and the Foo Fighters at Pimlico Race Course. Tickets for both days ranged from $175 for general admission to $450 for VIP passes. This year, the festival cuts back to one day, moves to the smaller Merriweather Post Pavilion and books slightly less glamorous headliners Blink-182, Weezer and Public Enemy. But - and this is a big "but" - this year's festival is free.
NEWS
By Sam Adams and Sam Adams,Special to The Los Angeles Times | August 29, 2008
The weeks before Labor Day at movie theaters tend to be a dumping ground for critical duds. But when it opened last week, The House Bunny won surprisingly strong notices for star Anna Faris. Although reviews of the movie were mixed overall, critics singled out Faris' turn as a bubble-headed Playboy bunny, praising her as a worthy heir to such dizzy dames as Carole Lombard and Judy Holliday. For the Baltimore native, playing dumb has been a smart move. Best known for her recurring role in the Scary Movie franchise, Faris has established herself as an expert in the art of blissful ignorance, whether she's playing a vacuous pop star in Just Friends or bringing a rare moment of comic relief to Brokeback Mountain.
FEATURES
By Michael Ordona and Michael Ordona,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 22, 2008
"Being a centerfold is the highest and most prestigious honor there is," uber-blond Shelley earnestly declares. "It says, 'I'm naked in the middle of a magazine. Unfold me!' " Such is the glazed-eyed charm of House Bunny, which is factory made, nothing new and really funny. The familiar plot finds a misfit sorority about to lose its house unless it can suddenly become popular. Enter Shelley, a sweetly vacant exile from the paradise called the Playboy Mansion, who is just spunky and sexy enough to solve everyone's problems.
NEWS
August 12, 2007
On Thursday, August 9, 2007, ALFRED WOODS, Beloved husband of Alice Woods (nee Bondy), loving father of Diane Hall, Robert Woods, Ruth Faris, all of Baltimore and David Woods of Virginia, loving father-in-law of Robert Roche, Patricia Woods, and Stacie Woods, devoted brother of the late Frances Sapphire and Irene Russell, beloved grandfather of Cheryl and Matthew Meyer, Michael Hall, Paul Faris, Harrison, Julia, and Austin Woods. Services at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Rd at Mt. Wilson Lane, on Sunday, August 12 at 9am, interment Baltimore Hebrew Cemetery-Berrymans Lane, Please omit flowers, contributions in his memory may be made to Jewish Family Services, 5750 Park Heights Ave, Baltimore, MD (21215)
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | August 25, 2006
Quirky, sweet-and-sour American comedies often become contemporary classics when they bring wit and humanity to settings too often merely caricatured, like teen beauty pageants in Smile (1974) and a fundamentalist-Christian high school in Saved! (2004). Little Miss Sunshine, the hit indie comedy of the summer, has links to both films. Like them, it's a tangy slice of dark Americana. But its final act unfolds in a setting even riskier for comedy or drama, especially these days: the Little Miss Sunshine contest, a prepubescent beauty pageant.
FEATURES
By MICHAEL SRAGOW and MICHAEL SRAGOW,SUN MOVIE COLUMNIST | August 11, 2006
WASHINGTON--Critics usually view MTV as the scourge of movies because its influence has spread flashy editing and splashy colors for their own sake and a reckless disregard for lucid and cohesive storytelling. But Jonathan Dayton and Valerie Faris, who came to MTV in the early 1980s, when they were fresh out of UCLA and the music channel was just getting rolling, represent MTV at its best and brightest. In 1983, they saw the chance to do The Cutting Edge, an interview and documentary-based MTV series, as a grand experimental opportunity, and then moved on to craft videos that explored with sympathy, nuance and imagination the visual components of performance.
NEWS
By Patrick Ercolano and Patrick Ercolano,Evening Sun Staff | September 24, 1991
As communism crumbles and the Soviet Union shatters, the people of Latvia are savoring political independence for the first time in five decades.Latvians also are rekindling the religious faith extinguished by Moscow in 1940, when the Soviets annexed the Baltic country.To help in that rebirth of faith, Southern Baptists from Maryland and Delaware are undertaking a three-year mission program that would spiritually and materially assist the estimated 4,700 Latvian Baptists.More than 100 local Baptist ministers and lay people are expected to travel to the Latvian capital of Riga to help renovate churches recently released from Soviet control, install computer equipment at the office of the Union of Latvian Baptists, and conduct seminars on Sunday school instruction and pastoral counseling, among other activities.
NEWS
October 16, 1994
Gambrill Mansion to be restoredFREDERICK -- Restoration of the Monocacy National Battlefield's historic Gambrill Mansion will begin early next year with $1.5 million in federal funding, National Park Service officials say.The money is part of a $13.65 billion congressional appropriation for the Interior Department and related agencies that was signed recently by President Clinton.The $1.5 million is the first part of a $5.8 million authorization that will finance the relocation of the park service's Preservation Training Center from Williamsport to the battlefield just south of Frederick, said Tom McGrath, the center's chief.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 14, 2006
Spoofs are, at once, both the easiest to watch and the hardest to perfect of all comedy films. They're easy to watch because they move rapidly, depend on characters and situations we're already familiar with, and have only one purpose: to make the viewer laugh. But they're hard to get just right because what one person finds funny, another will find simply stupid. And if the audience isn't familiar with the source material, most of the jokes will simply fly over their heads. Scary Movie 4 (Dimension Films)
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 9, 2006
ANNA FARIS WOULD like to be taken seriously. Despite the odds, she may get her wish. The wholesomely beautiful actress has parlayed an ability to seem cheerfully obtuse into a blossoming career. Fans of broad humor already know her as the star of the Scary Movie franchise, a series of horror-movie spoofs that in its first three installments has earned nearly $338 million at the U.S. box office. With Friday's scheduled opening of the latest chapter, Scary Movie 4, the Baltimore native will return to the screen once again as the eternally naive, heedlessly happy Cindy Campbell, a literal-minded small-town girl who ends up the butt of some of the most outrageous comedy in the Scary Movies.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.