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By Michael A. Fletcher | January 25, 1992
Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke yesterday nominated a new Board of School Commissioners, including six brand-new members.Mr. Schmoke nominated Philip H. Farfel, 40, a current board member and an administrator at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, as president of the new board. The nominations will be formally introduced at Monday's City Council meeting."I think the selection of folks is wonderful," said Council President Mary Pat Clarke, who last week introduced a bill NTC calling for a mostly elected school board.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN REPORTER | May 1, 2008
Lucille Gorham remembers a quiet, "nerdy" scientist who became a regular presence in her East Baltimore neighborhood, walking down dangerous streets and alleys as if he didn't know better. "He was very easy to talk to, didn't mind being in the neighborhood," said Gorham, former president of the Middle East Community Organization. "He talked like I talk, didn't talk with a lot of professional language I didn't understand." The scientist was Mark Farfel, the public health researcher who spearheaded a study eight years ago to see if composted sludge spread on inner-city yards could reduce the lead hazard in soil.
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NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN REPORTER | May 1, 2008
Lucille Gorham remembers a quiet, "nerdy" scientist who became a regular presence in her East Baltimore neighborhood, walking down dangerous streets and alleys as if he didn't know better. "He was very easy to talk to, didn't mind being in the neighborhood," said Gorham, former president of the Middle East Community Organization. "He talked like I talk, didn't talk with a lot of professional language I didn't understand." The scientist was Mark Farfel, the public health researcher who spearheaded a study eight years ago to see if composted sludge spread on inner-city yards could reduce the lead hazard in soil.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and David Kohn and Jonathan Bor and David Kohn,Sun reporters | May 1, 2008
While pursuing a public health degree in the 1980s, Mark R. Farfel visited a clinic at the Kennedy Krieger Institute where scores of lead-poisoned boys and girls spilled into the hallways awaiting treatment. There, he reached the central epiphany of his career: Youngsters already harmed by deteriorating lead paint were receiving world-class care. But who was "treating" the inner-city rowhouses that were sickening kids in the first place? "All we were doing was waiting for children to be poisoned," said Farfel, who then spent two decades at Kennedy Krieger and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health studying ways to reduce the hazard posed by lead in and around homes.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1996
More than a year after his term expired, Baltimore City School Board President Phillip H. Farfel has finally stepped down.Although Farfel's two terms on the board technically ended in December 1994, according to school officials, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke made no move to replace him, and Farfel continued to serve an extra 16 months.A spokesman for the mayor said yesterday that there were differences of opinion about the date Farfel's term ended -- the mayor believed it should end in December 1995, because one of Farfel's terms consisted of three years instead of the normal four.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1998
A former Baltimore school board chairman who believes the governor has reneged on a $10 million promise to give some of the city's worst schools a financial boost plans to take his case to the Circuit Court today.Phillip H. Farfel will file a motion in Baltimore Circuit Court asking that the state be required to pay the schools the $10 million annually over the next four years."I have decided to stand up and file this motion and make sure that this money gets to the kids and make sure 35 local communities receive what they were committed to," said Farfel.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and David Kohn and Jonathan Bor and David Kohn,Sun reporters | May 1, 2008
While pursuing a public health degree in the 1980s, Mark R. Farfel visited a clinic at the Kennedy Krieger Institute where scores of lead-poisoned boys and girls spilled into the hallways awaiting treatment. There, he reached the central epiphany of his career: Youngsters already harmed by deteriorating lead paint were receiving world-class care. But who was "treating" the inner-city rowhouses that were sickening kids in the first place? "All we were doing was waiting for children to be poisoned," said Farfel, who then spent two decades at Kennedy Krieger and the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health studying ways to reduce the hazard posed by lead in and around homes.
NEWS
By Mark Bomster and Mark Bomster,Evening Sun Staff | January 17, 1991
It doesn't matter whether they're sick, truant or on suspension: Students can't learn if they're not in school.In Baltimore, where more than 2,000 public school students miss at least 100 days of school each year, "lost instructional time" is a major problem."
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1995
Baltimore's school board president yesterday expressed renewed confidence in school Superintendent Walter G. Amprey, whose resignation was demanded last week by Democratic mayoral candidate Mary Pat Clarke.Phillip H. Farfel issued a one-page statement supportive of Dr. Amprey's nearly four years as head of the city's public schools."His grace, intelligence and continued leadership are exactly what we need to carry our educational programs into the next century," Mr. Farfel's statement said.
NEWS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,Sun Staff Writer | June 10, 1994
Backers of a new Waverly area school to be run primarily by teachers and parents stormed out of a Baltimore school board meeting last night when the board refused to tell them how much city money the school would receive.Leaders of the school, which would open next fall with about 100 students in grades four to nine, said board President Phillip H. Farfel had assured them at a meeting Tuesday that they would get a decision on funding last night.The school's supporters said they plan to take the issue to Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke immediately.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,SUN REPORTER | October 14, 2007
Dr. Harold Seymour Farfel, a pediatrician, died yesterday of pancreatic cancer at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson. He was 82. A doctor who prided himself on making house calls, Dr. Farfel continued until his recent illness to attend pediatric rounds at Sinai Hospital, where he was a resident from 1950 to 1952. One of the patients at his practice in Catonsville, which he opened in 1955, was a boy who would grow up to be governor, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., said Dr. Farfel's son, Dr. Mark Farfel of New York City.
NEWS
By Eric Siegel and Eric Siegel,SUN STAFF | October 31, 2002
IN MANY of Baltimore's older and poorer communities, demolition of decrepit buildings is a fact of life. Unfortunately, notifying nearby residents that the buildings are coming down - and giving them advice about what they should do when the wrecking ball hits - is not. Dr. Mark Farfel figures there is not much he can do about the former reality, nor does he necessarily want to. But the associate professor at the Kennedy Krieger Institute and Johns Hopkins...
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1998
A former Baltimore school board chairman who believes the governor has reneged on a $10 million promise to give some of the city's worst schools a financial boost plans to take his case to the Circuit Court today.Phillip H. Farfel will file a motion in Baltimore Circuit Court asking that the state be required to pay the schools the $10 million annually over the next four years."I have decided to stand up and file this motion and make sure that this money gets to the kids and make sure 35 local communities receive what they were committed to," said Farfel.
NEWS
By Marcia Myers and Marcia Myers,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1996
More than a year after his term expired, Baltimore City School Board President Phillip H. Farfel has finally stepped down.Although Farfel's two terms on the board technically ended in December 1994, according to school officials, Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke made no move to replace him, and Farfel continued to serve an extra 16 months.A spokesman for the mayor said yesterday that there were differences of opinion about the date Farfel's term ended -- the mayor believed it should end in December 1995, because one of Farfel's terms consisted of three years instead of the normal four.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1996
Departing from the public stance of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, Baltimore's top school officials yesterday opposed a proposal that would increase Maryland's role in running city schools.The officials spoke out with the knowledge of the mayor, who seems to be trying to placate them as he continues to negotiate a proposal that could eliminate their jobs.Schools Superintendent Walter G. Amprey and school board President Phillip H. Farfel said they met Wednesday night with Mr. Schmoke to urge him to leave the current administration intact.
NEWS
By Melody Simmons and Melody Simmons,Sun Staff Writer | August 23, 1995
Baltimore's school board president yesterday expressed renewed confidence in school Superintendent Walter G. Amprey, whose resignation was demanded last week by Democratic mayoral candidate Mary Pat Clarke.Phillip H. Farfel issued a one-page statement supportive of Dr. Amprey's nearly four years as head of the city's public schools."His grace, intelligence and continued leadership are exactly what we need to carry our educational programs into the next century," Mr. Farfel's statement said.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1995
After prodding from the state school board, Baltimore backed off yesterday from its earlier resistance to a state order to fix three low-achieving schools.Baltimore "is fully committed to the goals" of school reform "and to setting high standards for all the schools," said Phillip H. Farfel, president of Baltimore's school board. But city officials want to improve the schools in their own way and more state money "is a critical need so the children of Baltimore will get an educational opportunity comparable to that in the suburbs," he said.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,SUN STAFF | January 19, 1996
Departing from the public stance of Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke, Baltimore's top school officials yesterday opposed a proposal that would increase Maryland's role in running city schools.The officials spoke out with the knowledge of the mayor, who seems to be trying to placate them as he continues to negotiate a proposal that could eliminate their jobs.Schools Superintendent Walter G. Amprey and school board President Phillip H. Farfel said they met Wednesday night with Mr. Schmoke to urge him to leave the current administration intact.
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,Sun Staff Writer | March 3, 1995
Superintendent Walter G. Amprey asked the Baltimore school board yesterday for a $646.6 million operating budget for next academic year.Dr. Amprey is seeking a spending increase of about $14.7 million, or 2.3 percent, more than was approved for the current budget."
NEWS
By Jean Thompson and Jean Thompson,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1995
After prodding from the state school board, Baltimore backed off yesterday from its earlier resistance to a state order to fix three low-achieving schools.Baltimore "is fully committed to the goals" of school reform "and to setting high standards for all the schools," said Phillip H. Farfel, president of Baltimore's school board. But city officials want to improve the schools in their own way and more state money "is a critical need so the children of Baltimore will get an educational opportunity comparable to that in the suburbs," he said.
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