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Farewell

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2010
The announcement that the Cameron Mackinstosh/Really Useful Theatre Company, Inc. production of Andrew Lloyd Webber's "The Phantom of the Opera" is on its "Pharewell Tour" might be greeted with a grain of salt – judging by the farewell tours of some singers from the real opera world. The prize case is Giulia Grisi, a hugely popular soprano famed for her silvery-toned performances of Italian operas in the 1830s and ‘40s. As her vocal powers began to fade, her enjoyment of applause remained undiminished.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Amy Watts and For The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2014
It's movie night and we're still minus our regular theme song. I'm bitter. There's popcorn throwing and an opening dance number with a couple of Marilyn Monroe references: The iconic dress over the exhaust grate from "The Seven Year Itch" and the pink dress number (copied by Madonna for her "Material Girl" video) from "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. " Then there are baseball players? Because she married Joe DiMaggio? I don't know. These things don't have to make sense. Tom Bergeron introduces Kevin Hart, who gets an escort from a couple of the female pros and a quick dance before going to the judges table.
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EXPLORE
June 6, 2012
Havre de Grace bid adieu to one of its best loved residents this week, as John Eugene "Jack" McLhinney was laid to rest Monday in Mt. Erin Cemetery. Mr. McLhinney died May 29 at age 85. He was the son of a former city mayor, the late Walter McLhinney, and a partner in the family's McLhinney's News Depot. He was active in civic and fraternal organizations, in particular the Susquehanna Hose Company where he was the oldest living member at the time of his death. He served 63 years with the volunteer fire company, finally going inactive in 2011.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | September 25, 2014
NEW YORK - It is scheduled to rain here throughout the day, and there's a 70 percent chance of rain when Thursday night's series finale against the New York Yankees is supposed to begin. That's throwing the locals into a frenzy because of the possibility that Yankees shortstop Derek Jeter's final home game could be rained out. If the game cannot be played Thursday, it likely wouldn't be made up if it's a meaningless game in the standings. The Orioles are still chasing the American League's best record - and home-field advantage throughout the postseason - but they're running out of games to catch up with the Los Angeles Angels.
FEATURES
By Sarah Kickler Kelber and The Baltimore Sun | June 21, 2012
Lesley Brown, who was the first mother to have a child via in vitro fertilization, has died, according to the Telegraph. The birth of her daughter Louise made history in 1978. Lesley died at age 64 after a brief illness. Sad news indeed -- she went through the procedures after nine years of trying to get pregnant on her own, according to MSNBC . As the mother of a 4-year-old son conceived through IVF, I'm so thankful for the bravery of the family and for the pioneering researchers, as well.
SPORTS
By Boston Globe | July 24, 1995
ANDREWS, Scotland -- First, it was Arnold Palmer on Friday morning walking his final 18 holes in a British Open, over the hallowed soil of the Old Course at St. Andrews, where he revived this championship 35 years ago. Yesterday, it was time for Jack Nicklaus to follow suit, as he said a partial farewell to the tournament he's competed in since 1962.He rolled in a 5-foot putt on the 18th hole for a birdie and a 71296 valedictory that included a woeful 10 on the 14th hole in Thursday's opening round.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2012
Friends, family, fans and colleagues said a public farewell to WBAL radio show host Ron Smith Tuesday at Goucher College. And it was as powerful and moving in some respects as the way Smith, who died in December at age 70, lived his final weeks and months after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in October. The manner in which Smith shared his final days with his radio audience until he could no longer go on air, and then the way he said farewell to them in a live broadcast, was remarkable --  both public and yet incredibly intimate.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2012
The Della Rose's Tavern at Canton Crossing has closed. Its last night was last Friday. The closing announcement was made on the tavern's Facebook page. Written by Tony DellaRose, it's one of the best closing notices I've seen, absent of self-pity, just honest. And funny. DellaRose told me that he wrote the notice the same night he broke the news to his staff. "It was from the heart," he said. The Della Rose's on The Avenue in White Marsh remains open. "I'm looking at things from this day forward, DellaRose said.
NEWS
By Susan Reimer | May 9, 2004
TODAY IS MY LAST official Mother's Day. I will be accepting gifts, cards and words of affection for years to come, to be sure. But it will be in honor of what I was, not what I will ever be again. My youngest child will leave for college next fall, and with her will go my daily responsibilities, and my definition. "Mother" will be the salutation on a card. It will not be what I do. The truth is, my list of mothering tasks has been shrinking every year since this last child was weaned and potty trained.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | November 19, 2004
TEN YEARS ago, on the 50th anniversary of D-Day, Augustino "Bud" Paolino finally talked about his bloody war. He was dropped into Normandy aboard a flying coffin the night before the big invasion. He saw brutal action in France. He was wounded in Holland. He was wounded and lay bleeding in the snow at the Battle of the Bulge, with nothing but a bottle of cognac to drink. He was one of the first Americans to claw their way into Germany. But the story that choked him up was his homecoming.
BUSINESS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
With a gentle breeze blowing and temperatures in the low 80s, it was mild for a June afternoon on the Eastern Shore, but adjacent to the main attraction at the Queen Anne's County 4-H Park, it was hot as blazes. John Draper stood next to a 650-pound frying pan, stirring 140 pieces of chicken in 160 gallons of bubbling soybean oil with a pair of giant tongs. His face was flushed. The hair on his forearms was singed. And as the line of hungry customers grew to 100 people and more on Friday afternoon, he pondered why he'd decided to volunteer at the 65th Delmarva Chicken Festival, which will be the last, as old-time marketing gives way to more modern demands.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | March 8, 2014
COLLEGE PARK - More than six decades after playing its first Atlantic Coast Conference game at Ritchie Coliseum, Maryland will play its last ACC regular season game Sunday at Comcast Center against No. 5 Virginia. The Cavaliers were there for the opening of Cole Field House in 1955 and helped close it in 2002. But the roles of the respective teams will be nearly reversed from that game a dozen years ago. Maryland (16-14, 8-9 ACC) will be looking for a signature win while Virginia (25-5, 16-1)
SPORTS
By Gene Wang, The Washington Post | February 17, 2014
Feb. 17, 2008, is a day Maryland women's basketball coach Brenda Frese will hold dear for the rest of her life, and it has virtually nothing to do with the Terps ' victory over Duke that afternoon. Sure, it was the last time Maryland won at Cameron Indoor Stadium, but that morning, Frese had given birth to twin sons Markus and Tyler Thomas. Frese's players learned the news hours before tip-off, and they parlayed their enthusiasm into a 76-69 triumph that added to the lore of the heated series dating from 1978.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | November 29, 2013
RALEIGH, N.C. - It was neither football nor basketball season, but college athletics was very much in the news. Seven schools were bolting one conference and preparing to form another. The college sports landscape was in the midst of a highly publicized shake-up. It was the spring of 1953. The name of the new league was the Atlantic Coast Conference. Sixty years ago, Maryland was among seven schools to leave the Southern Conference and gamble that the new league would succeed On Saturday, Maryland plays it last football game in the ACC, a conference born from, and shaped by, realignment.
NEWS
By Alexander E. Hooke | August 28, 2013
"Can we say then … that the general economy of power in our societies is becoming a domain of security?" Michel Foucault, 1978 In 1791, the Fourth Amendment - sanctifying what we now call the human right to privacy - became part of the Bill of Rights. Barely had the ink of the signatures dried when it was already threatened by government. Congress immediately planned to take a census of the newly established country's population, only to be met by numerous citizens resisting officials poking their heads onto their property and asking about their children, size of home, how many males and females were over the age of 16. More than two centuries later, the right to privacy continues to be threatened and violated.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | June 12, 2013
While other city high school principals excitedly read off the names of colleges and universities their students will disperse to at the end of the school year, Denise Gordon fanned through a stack of acceptance letters with less enthusiasm. "New Era, Dunbar, Ben Franklin, Carver, Edmondson, Digital, Mervo - a lot of New Era," she read. Gordon, who has spent her eight years as a principal at Southside Academy, which closed its doors for good Wednesday, never thought she'd be sending her students to different high schools, faced with the school system's decision that they'd be better served somewhere else.
NEWS
By PHOTOS BY KIM HAIRSTON and PHOTOS BY KIM HAIRSTON,SUN PHOTOGRAPHER | January 2, 2006
The American Dime Museum on Maryland Avenue opened its doors to visitors for the last time Saturday. A large crowd showed up to say farewell to the mummy, the giant baseball bat and the other attractions.
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,Sun Staff | October 7, 2001
As the lights dimmed at Camden Yards tonight, the career of Orioles third baseman Cal Ripken also went dark. Ripken played in his final game, the 3,001st since leaving Triple-A Rochester for the major leagues in August 1981. He takes with him a warehouse full of records and accolades, and the organization's last link to a Hall of Famer. The connection began with Brooks Robinson and extended past Frank Robinson, Jim Palmer and most likely Eddie Murray. It ended tonight with baseball's Iron Man, the all-time leader for consecutive games played and a virtually certain first-ballot inductee to Cooperstown.
NEWS
Erica L. Green and Erica L. Green | June 7, 2013
Baltimore city schools CEO Andres Alonso tapped his favorite coming-of-age book by Leo Tolstoy to impart some lasting wisdom, and extend a final farewell, to city students as he closes out his last school year. In a letter addressed to city students Friday afternoon , Alonso said, "as I prepare to leave Baltimore City Public Schools after six years as CEO, I think mainly of you. " Alonso explained the love of books and reading he developed as a child, recalling how his father gave him four books as gifts on his first day of school.
NEWS
May 16, 2013
In the weeks following the news that city schools CEO Andres Alonso was leaving, I've come across various pieces of commentary about the legacy the schools chief will leave. As with most resignations, much of the commentary has been expressions of gratitude, and encouraging forecasts of what's next. I thought this piece , written by a city school teacher, was particularly reflective. I've personally watched Iris Kirsch, a high school English teacher, challenge Alonso during public comment at city school board meetings.
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