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BUSINESS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,SUN REPORTER | November 8, 2007
In a move to expand its share of business travelers, Southwest Airlines yesterday said it would begin selling a premium fare that guarantees buyers will be among the first to board the plane. The early boarding privilege will also be extended to passengers who fly at least 32 flights a year on the airline. A round trip counts as two flights. "We're simply offering business travelers more reasons to choose Southwest," Chief Executive Officer Gary Kelly said. "It will knock down some hurdles and hopefully gain us a lot more passengers."
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BUSINESS
By BLOOMBERG NEWS | August 23, 2002
DALLAS - Southwest Airlines Co. reduced its highest one-way ticket price 25 percent yesterday to $299, as the profitable discount carrier seeks to widen its advantage over larger U.S. rivals that are trimming service to stem losses. The cut from $399 applies even to tickets bought at the last minute and is aimed at attracting more business passengers, the airline said. Tickets bought just before travel often are purchased by business travelers and carry higher fares. Southwest said its highest fare applies to some seats on 36 percent of its routes and is paid by 1.3 percent of passengers.
NEWS
January 15, 1996
HOW CAN THERE BE mass transit if the masses aren't taking the transit? That was the premise behind the rate and route restructuring plans announced by the Mass Transit Administration.To be sure, the agency has enjoyed a few high-profile successes in recent years: the inauguration of the light rail line that coincided with the opening of Oriole Park and the extension of the Metro system to Johns Hopkins Hospital that has added 3,000 new riders. But by and large, mass transit officials 'N recognize that they have enjoyed only modest increases in ridership while highway traffic counts and the duration of the workday rush hour in the Baltimore-Washington corridor keep ballooning.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF | January 15, 1996
Upset that the Mass Transit Administration will increase bus fares by 8 percent while reducing service, city riders are threatening to boycott, organize marches and file racial discrimination lawsuits in hopes of reversing the changes.At noon today, a grass-roots group plans to protest at the corner of Lexington and Eutaw streets -- an event that organizers say will launch a series of actions that they believe will force MTA officials to back down.Sharon Ceci, spokeswoman for the All People's Congress, which is spearheading today's protest, said the fare increase is unfair to low-income city riders.
NEWS
By Laurie Willis and Laurie Willis,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2000
Reacting to skyrocketing gas prices, the state Public Service Commission has approved a temporary rate increase for Baltimore city and county cab drivers effective Monday. The increase, 35 cents per fare in the city and 30 cents per fare in the county, will remain in effect for 90 days, said Dwight Kines, general manager of Yellow Cab and Checker Cab, who applauded the action. The five-member PSC board unanimously approved the increase last week. It is 5 cents higher in the city because, on average, Baltimore drivers pick up four fewer fares per day, Kines said.
BUSINESS
By Robert Little and Robert Little,Sun Staff | January 24, 1999
Last year was the best ever at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, and yet it seems officials there are almost frantic.They're piecing together as many as five construction projects this year, including renovating a pier, adding baggage belts and finishing a new plane de-icing pad. They're expanding to accommodate one of BWI's largest customers. And they're shopping BWI's year-old international terminal around the globe in search of a new overseas carrier or two.It seems that record-setting years are the norm these days at Maryland's international airport.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,Staff Writer | July 31, 1992
From Crabtown to the Big Apple for $6.95.For about the price of lunch at a fast-food restaurant along the New Jersey Turnpike, travelers can board a Peter Pan Trailways bus at an East Baltimore depot for the 3 1/2 -hour trek to New York.The new discount fare, which a Peter Pan spokesman, Michael Paton, said is designed to introduce the bus company's service to the Baltimore area, is lower than the carrier had originally intended.In a press release faxed from its headquarters in Springfield, Mass.
NEWS
By Robert L. Jackson and Robert L. Jackson,Los Angeles Times | December 22, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Capping a three-year investigation, the Department of Justice filed a civil antitrust suit yesterday charging eight of the nation's largest airlines with using a computer system to fix prices in the $40 billion domestic air passenger business.Two of the airlines, United and USAir, the largest carrier at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, entered into a proposed consent decree to settle the charges, the department said, while the others indicated they would contest the suit.
BUSINESS
By McClatchy-Tribune | May 3, 2007
FORT WORTH, Texas -- So you have to catch a plane in a few hours to get to an unexpected business meeting. The cheapest fare, of course, will be on discount leader Southwest Airlines, which doesn't gouge last-minute passengers like other airlines. Right? Well ... maybe not. A new study from the University of California, Irvine suggests that it might pay to shop around before booking that Southwest ticket.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | February 12, 2011
The advertisement caught my eye: "Let's eat. Fried scrapple and hominy. It's only thirteen cents. " It appeared at the bottom of The Sun's local news page in 1934. If that amount seems low, I found another — 10 cents for country sausage and fried mush. Adjusted for inflation, the scrapple was $2.06 in today's money. The mush (a corn meal dish) would be $1.56 today. These dishes were standard fare at Baltimore's Oriole Cafeteria chain, a business that prospered during the Depression.
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