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Fare Wars

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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | April 30, 1995
BWI's coming back to Earth.The bargain fares that transformed Baltimore's once sleepy airport into the nation's fastest growing are nudging upward."Your boom days are over. The bargain days there are gone," said Melisssa Abernathy, a spokeswoman for American Express Travel Related Services in New York.While airfares at BWI remain lower than those at many cities, they are rising at a much faster pace. Between February and March this year, the average one-way fare from Baltimore to six key cities jumped 15 percent, according to a recent American Express survey.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2005
In a stunning day for the beleaguered U.S. aviation industry, Delta Air Lines Inc. and Northwest Airlines Corp. sought protection yesterday from creditors in a New York bankruptcy court, the latest of the major carriers struggling in an era of fare wars and rocketing fuel costs. Delta and Northwest would join UAL Corp., the parent of United Airlines, and Arlington, Va.-based US Airways Group Inc. in reorganization under Chapter 11 of the federal bankruptcy code, putting four of the nation's seven largest carriers into the court system.
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BUSINESS
By From Staff Reports | August 19, 1993
An article in yesterday's Business section about Continental Airlines' new fares incorrectly compared the carrier's new round-trip fare to Cleveland with the fare offered by Southwest Airlines. In fact, Continental's new fare is the same as Southwest's fare.The Sun regrets the error.Continental Airlines has upped the ante in the Baltimore fare wars.The airline yesterday announced round-trip fares of $38 to Cleveland -- $1 less than the fare Southwest Airlines offered Tuesday and $11 less than what USAir offered the same day.Continental also announced a $78 round-trip fare to Chicago's O'Hare International Airport -- the same as Southwest's and $11 less than USAir's fare.
TRAVEL
April 14, 2002
Charles McCool, the Virginia-based author of Winning the Airfare Game (Hawk Ridge Press, $14), offers these suggestions for nabbing a low airfare: Be flexible -- Using alternate airports, carriers and travel dates expands your options. Buy early -- Most discounted fares must be bought well in advance, two to three weeks early for the better fares. The best fares, however, are available during fare wars (which you can recognize by regularly checking prices and watching for reductions).
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | January 24, 1993
Well, travelers, the nation's airlines are in a real financial mess -- and to help clean it up, they want you to start paying your fair fare.After losing $8 billion over the past three years, the carriers are laying off thousands of workers, cutting wages, eliminating flights and replacing jets at many airports with smaller turboprops. And they're trimming some passenger comforts -- no meals on short flights, chicken instead of beef on longer ones.As the economy picks up, the industry's outlook for 1993 is brighter.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | September 15, 2005
In a stunning day for the beleaguered U.S. aviation industry, Delta Air Lines Inc. and Northwest Airlines Corp. sought protection yesterday from creditors in a New York bankruptcy court, the latest of the major carriers struggling in an era of fare wars and rocketing fuel costs. Delta and Northwest would join UAL Corp., the parent of United Airlines, and Arlington, Va.-based US Airways Group Inc. in reorganization under Chapter 11 of the federal bankruptcy code, putting four of the nation's seven largest carriers into the court system.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | March 13, 1994
*TC Not long ago, before the flying public discovered it could get there for practically nothing, USAir thrived. It flew places everyone went, like Boston and the Bahamas, and spots practically no airline did, like Buffalo and Binghamton. It charged what it needed to make a handsome profit.No longer.Discount carriers are crisscrossing USAir's East Coast territory, spelling good news for passengers but wreaking havoc for the airline that has long depended on high fares to cover its high costs.
BUSINESS
By Randolph Smith and Randolph Smith,Knight-Ridder News Service | December 17, 1991
Airfares are slowly rising.Round-trips to many domestic cities are $50 to $100 higher than they were a year ago. The cheapest fare to the West Coast, for example, is $378 -- up $40 from the $338 fare that expired Oct. 31.Still, there's good news. The price boosts are relatively moderate, and fare wars are likely to continue through the middle of next year.What's more, winter travel to Europe is cheaper than ever.The airlines can't charge full excursion fares -- $468 to the West Coast -- because discount fare wars have raged since last spring.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | May 3, 1994
More than a million passengers traveled through Baltimore-Washington International Airport in March, setting a record, as an explosion of fare wars has made once-sleepy BWI the nation's fastest-growing airport.Passenger traffic at BWI soared to 1.09 million in March, topping the previous record of 1.02 million in August 1989, shortly after USAir and Piedmont Airlines merged.Maryland Transportation Secretary O. James Lighthizer attributed the gains to a combination of lower fares, more flights and aggressive marketing, especially in the Washington area.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | July 10, 1993
USAir Group Inc. said yesterday that its June traffic was down 10.5 percent, a sharper decline than other big carriers have reported so far.The Arlington, Va.-based airline, the largest carrier at Baltimore-Washington International Airport, said the number of passengers was down largely because last summer's fare wars generated a huge volume of traffic in June 1992.The company said revenue passenger miles, representing the number of miles flown by all paying customers, dropped to 2.99 billion in June, from 3.34 billion last year.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1996
It's fare war season, with airlines touting MegaDeals and SuperSavings.While carriers typically offer a dozen major fare sales a year, summer ones are among the best.This year, with gasoline prices pushing up the cost of driving, more and more travelers are trolling for airfare bargains.With airline sales nearly as common as department store specials, passengers can expect deals to continue to crop up all summer, travel experts say."We're going to see a new fare war every two weeks or less," says Tom Parsons, editor of Best Fares Discount Travel magazine in Arlington, Texas.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | July 26, 1995
On a wing and a prayer.The performance of airline stocks for more than five years provided a turbulent flight for investors, because of fare wars, bankruptcies, recession, labor disputes and over-expansion.But skies have suddenly turned tranquil. After a $510 million loss for the industry last year, $1.5 billion in net earnings are projected for 1995. Next year could bring a record-breaking $2 billion.There are many reasons why. The economy may finally get its soft landing; carriers are flying more people on fewer airplanes; and fuel prices are lower.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1995
In a move that promises once again to drive down fares at BWI, Southwest Airlines yesterday announced its planned foray into the highly popular Florida market early next year.The airline, which sparked intense fare wars with its arrival at BWI two years ago, traditionally has flown East-West routes while avoiding the heavily traveled North-South routes where competition among airlines is fierce.Southwest's presence at BWI has kept fares low to the Midwest and other cities westward. But ticket prices to Florida have risen steadily in the past six months after Continental Airlines scrapped its discount CalLite operation, allowing the airport's other major carrier, USAir, to boost its fares.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | April 30, 1995
BWI's coming back to Earth.The bargain fares that transformed Baltimore's once sleepy airport into the nation's fastest growing are nudging upward."Your boom days are over. The bargain days there are gone," said Melisssa Abernathy, a spokeswoman for American Express Travel Related Services in New York.While airfares at BWI remain lower than those at many cities, they are rising at a much faster pace. Between February and March this year, the average one-way fare from Baltimore to six key cities jumped 15 percent, according to a recent American Express survey.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | May 3, 1994
More than a million passengers traveled through Baltimore-Washington International Airport in March, setting a record, as an explosion of fare wars has made once-sleepy BWI the nation's fastest-growing airport.Passenger traffic at BWI soared to 1.09 million in March, topping the previous record of 1.02 million in August 1989, shortly after USAir and Piedmont Airlines merged.Maryland Transportation Secretary O. James Lighthizer attributed the gains to a combination of lower fares, more flights and aggressive marketing, especially in the Washington area.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | March 13, 1994
*TC Not long ago, before the flying public discovered it could get there for practically nothing, USAir thrived. It flew places everyone went, like Boston and the Bahamas, and spots practically no airline did, like Buffalo and Binghamton. It charged what it needed to make a handsome profit.No longer.Discount carriers are crisscrossing USAir's East Coast territory, spelling good news for passengers but wreaking havoc for the airline that has long depended on high fares to cover its high costs.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | October 23, 1992
NEW YORK -- Three months of brutal airline fare wars have left their mark on USAir Group Inc., which reported yesterday that it lost $55.4 million for the July-to-September third quarter.Although the losses were steep, they were less severe than during the same period last year and in this year's second quarter.Wall Street analysts had expected the Arlington-based company's losses to grow and said that with higher fares and cost-cutting measures now in place, USAir could begin a turnaround to profitability.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | July 26, 1995
On a wing and a prayer.The performance of airline stocks for more than five years provided a turbulent flight for investors, because of fare wars, bankruptcies, recession, labor disputes and over-expansion.But skies have suddenly turned tranquil. After a $510 million loss for the industry last year, $1.5 billion in net earnings are projected for 1995. Next year could bring a record-breaking $2 billion.There are many reasons why. The economy may finally get its soft landing; carriers are flying more people on fewer airplanes; and fuel prices are lower.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Staff Writer | January 2, 1994
Baltimore-Washington International Airport, which became an East Coast megacenter of fare wars last year, expects to handle 1 million more passengers in 1994 and perhaps shed its image as the stepchild of Washington-area airports.Southwest Airlines, which sparked the fare wars with its BWI debut in September, will add one city, probably St. Louis, to its schedule this year. Other airlines, like Continental, are considering new flights and cities as well.If the double-digit percentage gains in passenger traffic experienced in the last three months of 1993 continue, the state-owned BWI will likely exceed 10 million passengers, thus closing the gap on Dulles International Airport in 1994.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | December 26, 1993
Visions of friends and family comfort Benjamin D. Macklowe during the rigors of holiday bus travel.Of course, it helps that he is about to be shown a movie. And the Baltimore resident appreciates the fact that the bus is new and clean.Above all, he likes the price. The private-school French teacher paid just $25.95 for his round-trip fare to New York on Peter Pan, $7.05 less than the Greyhound fare."It was the fare and its relationship to the cost of driving that made me decide to take the bus," said Mr. Macklowe, who is headed to his 23rd-birthday celebration on the Upper East Side.
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