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Fare Increase

NEWS
By Doug Birch | December 29, 1990
The Sun reported incorrectly yesterday that riders on th Baltimore Metro pay only the base fare. In fact, fares are based on distance traveled.The Sun regrets the error.The 350,000 daily riders of Mass Transit Administration buses and the Baltimore Metro would have to pay another 10 cents per trip beginning March 3, under a fare increase proposed yesterday by the MTA.Ronald J. Hartman, the MTA administrator, said an increase in the base fare from $1 to $1.10 was needed to keep revenues in pace with inflation.
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NEWS
March 30, 2010
Maryland suffered some of the biggest employment losses in the nation last month, shedding 13,800 jobs between January and February. Given the state's recession-driven economic woes, the last thing lawmakers should be considering is to make it more difficult for low-income people to get to work. But that's exactly what a major increase in the fares charged by the Maryland Transit Administration would do -- make it that much tougher to match the unemployed with jobs. Just as legislators are rightly reluctant to raise taxes in the midst of a recession, raising fares by a staggering 30 percent or more is a tax that hits the poor hardest and a policy that can only hinder the recovery.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | January 7, 1996
WASHINGTON -- Fortunately, the mills of justice do indeed grind slowly. Many courts come to cockeyed conclusions, so it is best that they not come to them quickly.Consider a case that should have been laughed out of court before battalions of lawyers filed the first cubic foot of briefs, a case that may churn on and on and could come to a remarkable conclusion. If the plaintiffs prevail, America can dispense with elections because judges will determine all social policies.The trouble began in New York when the Metropolitan Transportation Authority decided to raise subway and bus fares 25 cents to $1.50.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | September 9, 1993
BELTSVILLE -- A proposed 19 percent average increase in commuter train fares is too much too soon and will cost the Maryland Rail Commuter system customers, some irate MARC riders warned state officials last night.The fare increase, scheduled to take effect Oct. 1, would raise the cost of a one-way ticket 25 cents and reduce the discount for holders of monthly and weekly passes.Commuters warned representatives of the Mass Transit Administration that service on the MARC system continues to be poor and that a fare increase would reduce ridership.
BUSINESS
April 16, 2002
In the Region InfoVista to move headquarters from Columbia to N.Y. InfoVista SA is moving its U.S. headquarters from Columbia to New York, where it already has located its North American operations, finance and human resources functions, and its Northeastern sales staff. The French software company wouldn't say how many jobs will be lost in Columbia, but officials said some of their technical support and customer service employees will remain at the office on Little Patuxent Parkway.
NEWS
By MICHAEL DRESSER and MICHAEL DRESSER,SUN REPORTER | September 28, 2005
A day after President Bush urged Americans to get out of their cars and use mass transit, Amtrak said yesterday that it will raise fares nationwide to offset increased fuel costs and reinstate hefty increases for commuters in the Northeast corridor. In a concession to the outcry that followed its original decision to raise some commuter fares by hundreds of dollars a month, the railroad said it would implement that increase in two stages - one next month and the other in February. Then, commuters would have to absorb the same increases Amtrak announced Sept.
NEWS
By Stephen Kiehl and Stephen Kiehl,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2003
The state announced yesterday that transit fares in the Baltimore area will increase to $1.60 at the end of the month and several bus lines will be eliminated despite the protests of hundreds of riders and objections of some lawmakers. In a series of sometimes raucous public hearings last month, transit users questioned why they would have to pay a higher fare -- $1.60 instead of the current $1.35 -- for less service. But Transportation Secretary Robert L. Flanagan said those comments did not help balance the budget for the subway, light rail and buses.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2012
A provision of a Senate budget bill that passed Thursday would -- if accepted by the House -- require the Maryland Transit Administration to raise fares on its core services in Baltimore to keep pace with inflation. The clause in the annual budget reconciliation bill would end the transit fare freeze on MTA bus, subway and light rail services that has prevailed for almost a decade. The base one-way fare for those services is $1.60. A provision the Senate inserted into Gov. Martin O'Malley's original bill would require the MTA to adjust fares every other year, starting in the budget year beginning July 1, to account for increases in the Consumer Price Index over the previous two calendar years.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2010
The average fare at Thurgood Marshall Baltimore Washington International Airport increased more than 13 percent percent in the second quarter to $289.25, compared to $254.54 for the same quarter last year. Nationally, average fares were $341, up more than 13 percent from $301 in the second quarter of last year. Fares at BWI were lower than those at other airports in the region. Average fares at Dulles airport in Northern Virginia were $424.05, a 10.7 percent increase from $383.22 last year.
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