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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 11, 1996
Neil Simon's farce "Rumors" asks the question: What if everyone came to a party and the hosts never showed up? The Spotlighters Theatre is answering that question with a production directed by Robert Bayer and featuring actors Stephen Collins and Conni Kenney.Show times at the Spotlighters, 817 St. Paul St., are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays, through Jan. 29. Tickets are $10. Call (410) 752-1225.
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NEWS
April 7, 2007
ROBERT CLARK, 67 `Christmas Story' director Film director Robert Clark, best known for the beloved holiday classic A Christmas Story, was killed with his son in a car wreck Wednesday in Pacific Palisades, Calif., the filmmaker's assistant and police said. Mr. Clark specialized in horror movies and thrillers early in his career, directing such 1970s films as Children Shouldn't Play with Dead Things. His breakout success came with 1981's sex farce Porky's. In 1983, A Christmas Story marked a career high for Mr. Clark.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | October 21, 1994
Louder than a speeding bullet, louder than a powerful locomotive, louder than the end of the world in nuclear warfare, here's "Radioland Murders," which gives new meaning to the word . . . LOUD.Ouch! Ooof! I staggered out, the echoes in my head going off like pinballs in a stainless steel gourd. I dreamed that night of . . . noise!The movie, which I might add is almost completely charmless, chronicles the opening night of a fourth radio network out of Chicago in 1939 and is clotted with performers, producers, dancing cigarette girls, sponsors, gals Friday and a serial murderer.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | July 3, 2000
Farce is deceptive. It's light and frothy, but far from easy to perform. All those slamming doors, fast entrances and exits and dropped trousers have to be timed with great precision. If they're not, well, that's what Michael Frayn's "Noises Off" is all about. "Noises Off" takes the usual challenges of the genre and multiples them exponentially. And at Towson University's Maryland Arts Festival, director John W. Ford and his cast are splendidly up to the task. The situation is this: A British troupe is touring the provinces with a sex farce called "Nothing On."
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | January 13, 1994
Like life and death, comedy and tragedy are inseparably related -- a situation the late British playwright Joe Orton exploited to dramatic and comic effect in "Loot," his 1966 farce about death, detective stories and organized religion.As the inaugural production in the Vagabonds' renovated theater, "Loot" might seem a rather offbeat choice. In fact, the musical revue, "Cole," a more mainstream selection, was to have re-opened the theater in November, but was postponed due to construction delays.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | September 20, 1991
''Livin' Large!'' has great potential for farce. It doesn't realize all that potential, but it does have it's share of laughs.The film is also a little mean-spirited at times. Like so many contemporary film comedies, it reduces women to the level of ''bitches,'' but for every misstep, ''Livin' Large!'' has it's good moments.The movie was directed by Michael Schultz, who has a string of films to his credit including ''Car Wash'' and ''The Last Dragon.'' This is not his strongest film. It's a little too ramshackle, and technically, it doesn't have the polish Schultz's other films have had.However, there are laughs, the biggest of which takes place when Terrence (T.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | January 23, 2003
Ben Jonson's 1609 farce, The Silent Woman, was among the playwright's greatest hits. Both John Dryden and Samuel Taylor Coleridge used the word "perfect" to describe this satire of Jacobean society. But American audiences are largely unfamiliar with the work, which is receiving its first-known professional American production at Washington's Shakespeare Theatre, where it is currently in previews. Under Michael Kahn's direction, Ted van Griethuysen stars as Morose, an aging, noise-phobic bachelor who marries Epicoene (Ricki Robichaux)
NEWS
By Rona Hirsch and Rona Hirsch,Contributing Writer | November 6, 1992
Although the economy isn't something to laugh at, one local theater company believes laughter might be just the ticket for coping with today's economic ills.Using the tried and true tactics of Depression-era movies and theater, the Columbia Community Players is launching its first all-comedy season to lure hard-hit consumers.Ray Cooney's "Run For Your Wife" opens Nov. 13 at Slayton House, followed by "The Musical Comedy Murders of 1940" in February and "No Sex Please, We're British" in May.Bringing to mind the screwball comedies and musical extravaganzas of the 1930s, Players' president Lawrence Bory summed up what he believes today's audiences are looking for: entertainment and escape.
NEWS
By Patrick Hickerson and Patrick Hickerson,Contributing Writer | November 13, 1992
For those who are weary of a steady diet of R-rated movies, Madonna and MTV, Howard Community College's Smith Theatre may offer sanctuary for a few hours with its debut of "The Foreigner," a professional theatrical production.Save two or three obscenities, "The Foreigner" is a contemporary drama -- written less than a decade ago -- without contemporary elements such as sexual innuendo, coarse language and themes from the mean streets. If it weren't for a line about Diana, Princess of Wales, the play would be difficult to anchor in any particular time.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | October 12, 2008
Parental Advisory: The set's turrets and towers are reminiscent of a fairy tale. The theme music will set many members of the audience to humming a beloved nursery rhyme. And the title seems tailor-made to titillate the curiosity of 6-year-olds. But, moms and dads, leave Junior at home. Nothing in the production of The Underpants currently running at the Olney Theatre Center is even remotely childlike. No, this 1911 German sex farce (receiving a modern adaptation by that wild-and-crazy guy, Steve Martin)
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