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SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,candy.thomson@baltsun.com | September 20, 2009
I'll never forget the big old buck with a hairy eyeball that used to stare down at me from above the mantel at my great-uncle Walter's fishing and hunting cabin. Or the eggs fried in 30-weight oil and coffee from the Mister Mud Machine that jump-started every morning. Or the copperhead snakes that used to hide in the outhouse or under the rickety dock that hung out over the Susquehanna River. Good thing the bats kept them from getting too comfortable. Memories. I have them. You have them.
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SPORTS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | August 28, 1997
CHICAGO -- Michael Jordan is back.Was there any doubt?During a brief meeting in Las Vegas late Tuesday involving Jordan, agent David Falk and Bulls chairman Jerry Reinsdorf, Jordan agreed to a new one-year contract.Terms of the deal were not disclosed, but Jordan is believed to have been offered at least $36 million -- a 20-percent raise over last season. The contract is to be signed next week when Jordan returns from Las Vegas, where he is conducting a fantasy basketball camp.Both sides remained relatively quiet about the contract yesterday; their brief statements didn't address whether the coming season would be Jordan's final one with the Bulls.
NEWS
By Jean Marbella and Jean Marbella,Staff Writer | April 25, 1992
The intrepid spies landed at Baltimore-Washington International Airport yesterday afternoon for their top-secret mission, and within minutes their clue-solving skills were put to the test:Where was their luggage?Someone else will have to deal with the prosaic problem of lost bags, however.David Burns and Alison Pratt cannot be distracted from the real mission that brought them from their home in Edinburgh, Scotland, to Baltimore: to enjoy an expenses-paid vacation while pretending to be spies, which was the prize in a British Broadcasting Corp.
SPORTS
By Sports Digest | June 21, 2010
Washington DC Triathlon D.C. Mayor Fenty finishes 16th in inaugural competition Washington Mayor Adrian Fenty highlighted a field of more than 2,000 competitors Sunday in the inaugural Washington DC Triathlon, which featured Sprint and Olympic distance courses that wound through the city's monumental corridors before finishing along Pennsylvania Avenue. Competing in the Elite Olympic category, Fenty finished 16th in with a time of 2 hours, 19 minutes, 14 seconds.
FEATURES
By SYLVIA BADGER | January 12, 1991
It was celebration time at the Knights of Columbus in Perry Hall last week when more than 60 people gathered to roast their good friend George Stover, an award-winning news photographer for WMAR-TV. Stover's friends celebrated his 40th in style -- story-telling style.Susan White Bowden told funny stories about the birthday boy, including the time she had to interview Rock Hudson. She was mooning over Hudson's good looks and Hudson only had eyes for George!Good-natured teasing also came from Jack Bowden, Sandy and Tony Pagnotti, Toba and Andy Barth, Elaine and Jack Dawson and WPOC's evening deejay Diane Lyn.Others at the party were Sheila and Craig Silverstein, she's with WPOC and he's a lumber company exec; Norm Vogel, Channel 13 cameraman; Harold Glaser, attorney; and Channel 2's Mark Vernarelli.
SPORTS
By John Steadman | November 18, 1992
NOTEworthy Day:Changing of the guard continues for the Orioles with the departure of Bob Brown as director of publications (he'll continue to edit the Oriole Gazette with a high degree of professionalism) and Ken Nigro as director of special projects. Nigro will remain in charge of the midwinter fantasy camp and the team's promotional cruises. Had they been placed in the expansion draft, both would have represented first-round choices.* If you're interested, the football referee who made the appropriate but unusual call that extended the Towson State-Northeastern game to one more play, which was decisive, was Robert Lynch of Ridgewood, N.J. . . . No man has done more for sports in Baltimore than Zanvyl Krieger, once an owner of the Colts, Orioles and Clippers and helpful in the building of Towson Golf and Country Club, but more important his philanthropic work at the Krieger-Kennedy Institute transcends the fun and games.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1996
Happy 187th, Mr. Lincoln.* "The American Experience" (9 p.m.-10 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67) -- "The Wright Stuff" is a quiet look at Wilbur and Orville Wright, who took time from their jobs making bicycles to invent the airplane. Not the best or most enthralling "American Experience," it's still interesting stuff. PBS.* "Partners" (9:30 p.m.-10 p.m., WBFF, Channel 45) -- In a sweeps week coup that can't be making NBC happy, Jennifer Aniston of "Friends" shows up as a new girlfriend who asks Bob (Jon Cryer)
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Evening Sun Staff | August 2, 1991
EMMITSBURG -- We are ready for the worst. People who had been through it before said it would be tough. Grueling. We smile, innocently. And after the first session of Wes Unseld's/Gatorade Fantasy Camp, we pooh-pooh, "Piece of cake!"THE ORDEAL: The 35 campers -- 33 men and two women -- ardivided into four teams as Unseld, the Washington Bullets coach, thanks all for signing up, explaining, "I have to thank you, because I don't have any idea why anybody would want to do this."No sooner is the welcoming address over when we are stretching and knocking off two laps around Knott Arena on the Mount St. Mary's campus.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | June 18, 2010
"I'm so happy my husband doesn't know who I am," Carolyn Williams said. No, she's not a misbehaving housewife on some tacky TV show. Williams was attributing her fresh rush of cheer to her participation in the inaugural BSO Academy, which wrapped up an intensive week of activities for adult amateur musicians with a "donor appreciation concert" and party on Saturday at Meyerhoff Symphony Hall. Nearly 50 people from around the region paid up to $1,650 for this new community outreach venture by the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, a camp for grownups who wanted to take their musical interests to a different level.
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